What type of gross things do registered nurses have to do? - page 4

by Neisha_ 16,044 Views | 106 Comments

I'm going to get straight to the point. Is it true that nurses have to change "poopy" diapers/patients and or deal with dead bodies? I would love to get into nursing, but those are my deal breakers. PLEASE HELP. All... Read More


  1. 7
    I don't understand what the big deal with poop is. Everybody poops. There's even a book for preschool aged children about it. If you've ever babysat or if you plan on having children in the future, you'd change those diapers, right? So why is it such a deal breaker with nursing? Dealing with poop is a very small part of what we do.
    Brian_G, sharpeimom, phoenixnim, and 4 others like this.
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    Quote from kalevra
    There is an easy way out... do not become an RN.

    I recommend getting your bachelor's degree in science like kinesiology/ microbiology/ etc. Then apply for PA school. Then spend your working years doing "Gentlemen's" work in an office. It means you show up in business casual attire, sit down with patients, listen to their problems, write a prescription, write consults, referrals, etc. If there is an emergency just call 911.

    No dead bodies, no poop wiping, no vomit.

    These words are from my best friend who started out as an RN and transitioned over to PA. He did it for the more relaxed pace and better on your back.
    That's all well and good when you're DONE with PA school and want to go into GP. However, you'll have to deal with cadaver lab in PA school. And you'll have intensive clinicals in the ER. There's no way around the vomit, blood & death.
    Brian_G and Akewataru like this.
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    Yes but if you would of told me that nursing involved that I'd of looked the other way. With that being said now that I'm doing it as a CNA I don't even think about it. When it's in context of a real person that is ill and helpless it changes everything. At least it does for me.
    Brian_G, Glycerine82, poppycat, and 4 others like this.
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    Quote from SopranoKris
    That's all well and good when you're DONE with PA school and want to go into GP. However, you'll have to deal with cadaver lab in PA school. And you'll have intensive clinicals in the ER. There's no way around the vomit, blood & death.
    PA school will fly by like sand through an hour glass.

    We have all seen those RN students just getting by with minimal "gross-stuff" exposure. They passed boards and are working RNs. Some get into a very relaxed position like case management, admin, education etc. It isn't uncommon for someone to find a "clean" job.

    Its the 20,30,40 years of poop that most people want to avoid.
  5. 1
    Quote from Neisha_
    I'm going to get straight to the point.
    Is it true that nurses have to change "poopy" diapers/patients and or deal with dead bodies?

    I would love to get into nursing, but those are my deal breakers.

    PLEASE HELP.

    Depending on what type of nursing, and what type of unit you work on, that will happen a lot... Or a little.

    Someone once wrote that wiping patient butts as as much to do with the practice of nursing, as changing diapers has to do with being a parent.

    Overall, It's part of it, not most of it.
    Sassenach likes this.
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    Did we REALLY just devote an entire thread to "do nurses have to deal with gross stuff?" LOL
    Michaela, RN, rubato, poppycat, and 4 others like this.
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    Quote from MrChicagoRN
    Depending on what type of nursing, and what type of unit you work on, that will happen a lot... Or a little.

    Someone once wrote that wiping patient butts as as much to do with the practice of nursing, as changing diapers has to do with being a parent.

    Overall, It's part of it, not most of it.
    Med Surge setting in a hospital located deep in the hood. Trust me, there is a lot of butt wiping in my world.

    The best part about nursing are the little niches. Theres a position to fill everyones needs. You just have to find it,
  8. 1
    Really....you get over it. It's amazing that one day the smell won't bother you and you'll be able to finish doing something with bodily fluids, wash your hands, and eat your lunch!

    Last night I had to help put an NG tube (tube that goes into someone's nose down to their belly) because they were vomiting poop. Yes that really happens. Tonight she feels so much better. It's totally worth it with patients like that!

    Get a job as a CNA or PCA and try it out. That's what I did. 3 months tops, I swore. That was 12 years ago. I've been a nurse for 8 years now. You never know.
    loriangel14 likes this.
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    Quote from nursestacy123
    Did we REALLY just devote an entire thread to "do nurses have to deal with gross stuff?" LOL
    Yes, and we will again. Some threads are regular repeaters. The time interval isn't predictable like Haley's Comet though.
  10. 16
    Often the poo is more attractive to deal with than the person it came out of.
    Glycerine82, Halcyonn, nurseladybug12, and 13 others like this.


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