What type of gross things do registered nurses have to do? - page 3

by Neisha_

15,546 Views | 106 Comments

I'm going to get straight to the point. Is it true that nurses have to change "poopy" diapers/patients and or deal with dead bodies? I would love to get into nursing, but those are my deal breakers. PLEASE HELP. All... Read More


  1. 1
    I have seen and touched things that I never thought I would. No joke! I also thought that I wouldn't be able to handle some of the "less desirable" things that I knew nurses have to deal with. But frankly not much bothers me anymore. So you may be able to get past it just as I have. Best wishes!
    Glycerine82 likes this.
  2. 0
    Thank you!
  3. 1
    Quote from Neisha_
    Yes, I am very mature for my age, there are just some things that my stomach can not bear. Therefore, I am looking into some Ultrasound Technician Programs around my town.

    Thanks for your response!
    My daughter thought about going into nursing until I told her that it's not just passing meds and that she would have to deal with other things that aren't so pleasant. She opted to go into radiology instead. That might be a good choice for you as well.
    Neisha_ likes this.
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    Omg, your comments are so helpful. I appreciate it, and is it easy to find a job in radiology after graduation?
  5. 0
    Physical therapy assistants sound just as plausible
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    I was doing research a while back and I read that radiology/ultra sound tech jobs are hard to come by, so I would research it first!

    Don't waste time seeking an easy way but also take the time to gain life experience!
    poppycat and Neisha_ like this.
  7. 4
    Quote from Geslina
    Unfortunately, yes. It's a given. CNA's call out, or need help, or sometimes there is just no one else there to do it. Some nights I wipe more butts than others, and some nights I don't wipe any butts at all....but one never knows. And then you have colostomy patients....to be honest, the only thing that REALLY grosses me out these days is trach care, suctioning, anything respiratory.
    I'm the same way. I can deal with c. diff poo, vomit, colostomy drainage.....but when it comes to peoples respiratory secretions....YUCKA!!! Don't know what it is...but yucka!!!!
    Brian_G, nurseladybug12, SNB1014, and 1 other like this.
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    Luckily, my mum is an rn and I am fully aware of the not so pleasant things a nurse must encounter. Does it bother me? Not at all. Not much bothers me except bad eye infections ( I am a nut and have a difficult time putting eyedrops in my own eyes:/) so I'll get over it eventually. The only thing to ever bother my mother was having to pull a tapeworm from someone's rectum. Haha! Some people have the stomach for these sort of things and others do not. Of course there will be a few things that bother us all, that is human nature but nurses know that. You gotta get over it. If you thinking changing diapers and cleaning up feces is disgusting and a deal breaker I'd consider another career.
    Neisha_ likes this.
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    Yes you will have to care for dead bodies. That includes cleaning them up and making them presentable for family

    Yes you will have to deal with vomit. This includes spitting in your face as well form combative patients.

    Yes you will have to deal with poop. This includes patients with infectious diarrhea such as Clostridium Deficil.

    Yes you will have to deal with blood. This includes patients pulling out their IV lines or women hemorrhaging from their vagina after giving birth.

    Yes you will have to deal with every possible bodily fluid known to science. This includes getting some bodily fluid on you, accidents happen.

    Yes you will go home some days and wished you had a shower out doors. This is because of how disgusting you feel after bodily fluids form an infectious combative patient can randomly get on you.

    Need I say more?
    Brian_G, Neisha_, poppycat, and 1 other like this.
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    There is an easy way out... do not become an RN.

    I recommend getting your bachelor's degree in science like kinesiology/ microbiology/ etc. Then apply for PA school. Then spend your working years doing "Gentlemen's" work in an office. It means you show up in business casual attire, sit down with patients, listen to their problems, write a prescription, write consults, referrals, etc. If there is an emergency just call 911.

    No dead bodies, no poop wiping, no vomit.

    These words are from my best friend who started out as an RN and transitioned over to PA. He did it for the more relaxed pace and better on your back.
    Neisha_ likes this.


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