Very worried about duties :( - page 2

Hello everybody! My name says it all...I have so many interests that I could be in school forever! However, I need to get going on something to support my big family :) I originally went back... Read More

  1. by   ProfessionalStudent
    Quote from JoshuaC
    Nursing is a calling. If you're not getting into nursing because you want help people then you shouldn't be in nursing, period. Not everyone has what it takes to be a nurse.

    There are literally DOZENS of jobs that you can do by being an RN. Some of them do not even deal with the public. Any job you do, you should do your best at...or it's not worth doing at all. I don't care if you are shining shoes...you should take pride in it. There are many jobs out there that are a "calling": nursing, teaching, preaching, government, artist....do you see my point? If your heart and head are not in something, you shouldn't be doing it...not just nursing. I'm just trying to find out some info about school, like I said before...I must have posted in the wrong place and I am sorry
  2. by   JoshuaC
    Quote from ProfessionalStudent
    There are literally DOZENS of jobs that you can do by being an RN. Some of them do not even deal with the public. Any job you do, you should do your best at...or it's not worth doing at all. I don't care if you are shining shoes...you should take pride in it. There are many jobs out there that are a "calling": nursing, teaching, preaching, government, artist....do you see my point? If your heart and head are not in something, you shouldn't be doing it...not just nursing. I'm just trying to find out some info about school, like I said before...I must have posted in the wrong place and I am sorry
    Any job an RN does is directly involved with healthcare. Even if you were working in administration, it still affects people later down the chain. But most RNs don't go to nursing school not to be involved with the public.

    But everything else you said I agree with. Did you think I didn't? But still it's best to know what you really want to do before you dive into anything for the wrong reasons. I'm sure you'll make the right decision though.
  3. by   Jolie
    Quote from ProfessionalStudent
    Since I really want to be in the health care field, I am hoping this will be a good choice for me My curicullum has no chem. in it at all. There is A&P and micro but I am very adept at biology so I should be set with that. I already took Chem I if it's ever needed down the road...but for the RN program, it's not.

    I eventually want to be an administrator but I feel as though I'd be a better one if I began with learning what I'll be preaching

    Wow! I can't imagine a nursing program that does not require chemistry. It is the basis for so much of what you will learn in biology, microbiology, anatomy, physiology, and pharmacology. I have to say that I would question the quality of a program that does not require it.

    Many of the posters that have responded to your question are experienced nurses who raise valid points about the need to work in an entry-level patient-care RN position before moving on to other work such as administration, case management, etc. That will involve hands-on contact with both well and sick patients. Perhaps it would be a good idea to try to "shadow" a nurse for a few days to get a better idea of what nursing entails before sinking a lot of time and money into schooling.

    Good luck!
  4. by   tookewlandy
    Quote from ProfessionalStudent
    To Tookewlandy, I merely wanted to give a little background about myself. It's not that I feel this is a back up plan or my only choice. I couldnt fully understand the chemistry stuff so I couldnt go on with my pharmacy major. I have a strong desire to be in the health care field. I only wanted to know about some of the duties that they have you do during schooling...but I haven't gotten too much feedback about that yet. I should probably be addressing this to those who have already been through it, I am sorry...I posted in the wrong thread

    Thank you though and good luck to you all!!
    No you did not post in the wrong place at all, i was just trying to tell you that no matter where you want to go, you gotta go through school and probably have to get some kind of experience at where you will have to deal with all the stuff you don't like, you know what i mean. I suggested getting a CNA position while you are in school to help you overcome the gross stuff. And i said nursing wasn't a calling for everyone because someone said you have to be called to do it, or want to do it and if your not you cannot be a good nurse. You did not post int he wrong place and if i made you feel that way im sorry,that was not my intention at all

    Andy
  5. by   SummerGarden
    Hi, I want to be an administrator too. And if I work bedside, it will not be very long in a civilian job (6 mo.-1yr). If I enter the military then I will put in more time bedside because I will also be trained to lead a team as well as become an effective administrator. With that said, I in no way think that either bedside or administrators avoid talking to or interacting with the public. However, I do know a profession where your audience will not be patients.

    You can move into public policy as it relates to health care. You do not need a degree in nursing but it helps to have a health care related degree (psych, social work, humanities.. etc.). You will be talking too and interacting with others including health care professionals (nurses, docs...) but this is only to design and implement policies.

    How do you get into the field? Well, as with any field you need a work background and it helps to have connections too. Volunteering for community organizations as well as working in government social services, political public services, or private and public non-profit organizations can help you gain experience and connections. NO CHEM required!

    I worked in the field for years and still do. I love it, it is my niche! Good luck. :spin:
    Last edit by SummerGarden on Aug 14, '06
  6. by   ProfessionalStudent
    Quote from JoshuaC
    Any job an RN does is directly involved with healthcare. Even if you were working in administration, it still affects people later down the chain. But most RNs don't go to nursing school not to be involved with the public.

    But everything else you said I agree with. Did you think I didn't? But still it's best to know what you really want to do before you dive into anything for the wrong reasons. I'm sure you'll make the right decision though.
    Hi Joshua, oh no...I am counting on working with people I just have no idea what clinicals involve and wondered what duties we will be exposed to while there Also, what the path is to get into the admin. end of it.
  7. by   ProfessionalStudent
    Quote from Jolie
    Wow! I can't imagine a nursing program that does not require chemistry. It is the basis for so much of what you will learn in biology, microbiology, anatomy, physiology, and pharmacology. I have to say that I would question the quality of a program that does not require it.

    Many of the posters that have responded to your question are experienced nurses who raise valid points about the need to work in an entry-level patient-care RN position before moving on to other work such as administration, case management, etc. That will involve hands-on contact with both well and sick patients. Perhaps it would be a good idea to try to "shadow" a nurse for a few days to get a better idea of what nursing entails before sinking a lot of time and money into schooling.

    Good luck!
    Thank you for the post Well, I dont know...there is no chem in the program but a lot of bio's. I did already take chem I in my math/science major. I really just wanted to know what kinds of duties we will be performing in the clinicals, I guess I worded it all wrong .
  8. by   ProfessionalStudent
    Quote from tookewlandy
    No you did not post in the wrong place at all, i was just trying to tell you that no matter where you want to go, you gotta go through school and probably have to get some kind of experience at where you will have to deal with all the stuff you don't like, you know what i mean. I suggested getting a CNA position while you are in school to help you overcome the gross stuff. And i said nursing wasn't a calling for everyone because someone said you have to be called to do it, or want to do it and if your not you cannot be a good nurse. You did not post int he wrong place and if i made you feel that way im sorry,that was not my intention at all

    Andy
    Oh no, thank you for all of your posts I was just wondering about the duties we will be expected to perform during clinicals I honestly have NO IDEA what to expect I think that if I want to help others, I will overcome any "hard things" to deal with. It's all for the greater good
  9. by   ProfessionalStudent
    Thank you for the post I do want to work with the public, I was just stating that theres alot in the field that is not directly with patients

    If anybody knows about the classes and clinical, let me know
  10. by   smilin_gp
    Hmm clinical duties . .

    A short list of what I can think of (sorry, I'm still sleepy)

    Physical assessments: Assessing patients' health status-skin, circulation, respiratory system, nutritional status, GI status, etc. Assess for changes throughout shift.

    Medications: Responsible for giving medications by mouth/injection/IV/rectum as ordered. Also responsible for looking up all new medications, side affects and factors affecting administration

    Hygeine: Some facilities utilize CNA's for this one, but many don't and this time is a great time to assess the patient's skin and general condition

    Wound care: Many different sorts of wounds out there and many different orders for how to treat these.

    Nutrition: Assisting patients with eating if they are at risk for aspiration, or managing tube feeds or IV nutrition

    Pain control: Assessing for signs and symptoms of pain and treating pain with medications, positioning etc.

    Elimination: This is the sticky part for most people. What goes in has to come out, so must assess patients for constipation, urinary retention, nausea etc. Then following MD orders in how to treat said constipation/retention/nausea as indicated.

    In clinical and in nursing, you also have to act as an advocate for patients and families, answering questions if you can or finding appropriate person who can. In clinical, your duties will include a large amount of paperwork regarding specific health conditions, medications and nursing interventions.

    Hope this helps!
  11. by   Daytonite
    i think that before you embark on any nursing curriculum you should do some serious reading about a career in nursing so you know what you are getting in to. here's some places to start.

    http://www.discovernursing.com/
    http://www.nursingsociety.org/career/cmap.html

    http://www.wetfeet.com/content/careers/nursing.aspx - about nursing from webfeet.com

    http://stats.bls.gov/oco/ocos083.htm - about registered nursing from the u.s. department of labor

    http://www.collegeboard.com/student/...ers/45263.html - "ten questions to ask yourself" about nursing and if it might be right for you

    http://www.collegeboard.com/student/...reers/228.html - this is a career worksheet put together by college board.com (the people who write the sat and clep tests!). this is for those of you who aren't quite sure that nursing is for you and something you can do to help you make that decision.

    http://www.collegeboard.com/student/...eers/8585.html - "reality checks for career planning". this is about remaining flexible and exploring your options as you are still working toward making a decision about your career.
  12. by   ProfessionalStudent
    Thank you guys, for your posts and links...Im going to read them now

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