Unprofessional School Orientation - page 3

by Dakovich 4,031 Views | 33 Comments

I was accepted to a local Community College RN program, and today was the orientation. Only 10 students were there, apparently we were the early acceptance group as no other students had been notified as of yet. We were all... Read More


  1. 2
    Quote from sharpeimom
    what kind of notebook to buy sounds more like a fourth grader's question rather than a college student's question. that type of question tells your faculty a lot more about the question asker than i think the asker intended. the type of notebook you use is the kind you want to use unless a certain type is specified for some reason -- i.e. handing in a project or your patient notes, careplans etc.

    kathy
    shar pei mom
    i'm sorry, but i disagree. even if the instructor had been asked to clarify a couple of times, it takes but a second. moreover, as a student entering a rn program, i would definitely want to be prepared as best as i can. you're already going to be anxious/nervous as is, so what's wrong with wanting to be prepared as best as you can be?

    i just finished microbiology. yes, i asked my instructor numerous questions on lab procedures. was it because i wasn't paying attention? no. was it because it because the procedure/protocol was a bit unclear? maybe. was it because i prefer to be thorough, prepared, and i want to do something well and not mediocre? yes.

    sometimes, i think people should do some introspection and realize that those 4th grade rudimentary, interpersonal skills are pretty valuable. granted this is about notebooks, and not in a clinical setting...still, on principle, i think it's a good thing the student asked the instructor to recapitulate. there is nothing "4th grade" about asking a question regarding logistics, especially if you're a new student about to enter a profession where a logistical question may save a life.
    Cherry02 and dgolden like this.
  2. 0
    Quote from j450n
    I'm sorry, but I disagree. Even if the instructor had been asked to clarify a couple of times, it takes but a second. Moreover, as a student entering a RN program, I would definitely want to be prepared as best as I can. You're already going to be anxious/nervous as is, so what's wrong with wanting to be prepared as best as you can be?

    I just finished microbiology. Yes, I asked my instructor numerous questions on lab procedures. Was it because I wasn't paying attention? No. Was it because it because the procedure/protocol was a bit unclear? Maybe. Was it because I prefer to be thorough, prepared, and I want to do something well and not mediocre? Yes.

    Sometimes, I think people should do some introspection and realize that those 4th grade rudimentary, interpersonal skills are pretty valuable. Granted this is about notebooks, and not in a clinical setting...still, on principle, I think it's a good thing the student asked the instructor to recapitulate. There is nothing "4th grade" about asking a question regarding logistics, especially if you're a new student about to enter a profession where a logistical question may save a life.
    I agree that I would rather answer 4 dumb questions than have 1 really important question not asked, especially when the consequences of the not asked question are harm or death to another human being. In that case, I'd rather someone think I'm a pain in the butt for getting things re-clarified until I know I understand, than risk a big-time mistake.

    I think what Sharpiemom was alluding to is the person in a lecture hall or classroom setting who wastes everyone else's time asking questions about things that have already been mentioned while they were chit-chatting with friends, are on a list or handout, could be asked of a friend or buddy or are best handled during office hours/before/after class. The way I look at it, in-class time is finite, one student's behavior affects the other's quality of education, and it just shouldn't be squandered on dumb stuff. Good instructors respect everyone's time, and don't let the small issues pull them off track.
  3. 2
    Quote from LisaMSN
    Totally OT but I have to ask why "professional airline pilot" is in RN school. I'm a FNP working full time. My husband is a pilot and he makes 3x what I make! Going from being a pilot to a RN makes no financial sense to me at all............
    Because it is not "all about the money."
    mercuryrawks and Dakovich like this.
  4. 0
    Quote from j450n
    I'm sorry, but I disagree. Even if the instructor had been asked to clarify a couple of times, it takes but a second. Moreover, as a student entering a RN program, I would definitely want to be prepared as best as I can. You're already going to be anxious/nervous as is, so what's wrong with wanting to be prepared as best as you can be?

    I just finished microbiology. Yes, I asked my instructor numerous questions on lab procedures. Was it because I wasn't paying attention? No. Was it because it because the procedure/protocol was a bit unclear? Maybe. Was it because I prefer to be thorough, prepared, and I want to do something well and not mediocre? Yes.

    Sometimes, I think people should do some introspection and realize that those 4th grade rudimentary, interpersonal skills are pretty valuable. Granted this is about notebooks, and not in a clinical setting...still, on principle, I think it's a good thing the student asked the instructor to recapitulate. There is nothing "4th grade" about asking a question regarding logistics, especially if you're a new student about to enter a profession where a logistical question may save a life.

    It takes more then a second to clarify, if we are being honest here, and clarifying once might not be a problem, clarifying more then once on the same thing and having to do so repatidily during class every few minutes adds up and takes a lot of time away from the rest of the course matter. Their are kids in my nursing class that CONSTNATLY ask for clarification on things. Absurd things, for example,

    Teacher says, "you will need to wear your scrubs and entire clinical get up on simulation days. All simulation days are outlines in the syllabus".

    right away (which doesn't bug me as much, in case it was hard to hear. )

    "So we dress just as we would if going to clinical on simulation days and all of those are clearly stated in the syllabus"?

    Instructor= "yes"

    5 mins later, student raises hand, " So in the syllabus it says that their is a simulation day tomorrow, do we wear our scrubs?"

    Instructor= "yes"

    20 mins later, instructor is explaining what will happen during simulation. Student raises hand

    "Do we need to wear our scrubs tomorrow"


    This happened ALL THE TIME, it was very distracting, very annoying, and by the end of class the teacher didn't have time to finish what was planned on the lecture.

    It's absurd and finally by the end of the semester the instructor had enough and told everyone they better right it down because this was going to be the LAST TIME she explained what days we would need to wear our clinical attire outside of clinicals, Students had the nerve to say what a B*^&* she was for saying that.

    This was just ONE example.
  5. 0
    Yeah, I agree with you on that point. It is annoying. In one of my classes this went on but the most unreal part was the student who kept asking questions that were answered repeatedly. She would then turn to the class and make faces and arm gestures like the instructor was an idiot while the instructor was answering her question for the billionth time. grrrr You wonder how students like this make it this far.
  6. 0
    The same young lady who called our algebra instructor an idiot recently turned to me after asking a question and said, archly, "She asks like I'm not supposed to ask that!".

    The odd thing is that there was nothing in the instructor's demeanor or response which could lead one to conclude that she was annoyed by the question or considered it one to which the student should have known the answer (even if it's true that the student should have).

    Astounding the walls we put up, the difficulties we will place in our own paths, the hills we are willing to die on, the attitudes we will take.
  7. 0
    Quote from jo'ee
    Personally, I feel that orientations and the application process is a huge indicator of how the nursing school is run.
    I am currently at community college finishing up my pre reqs. I applied to this community college and several other programs as well. The community college is so unorganized in every aspect. They lose your transcripts, can't get anyone on the phone in the admissions office, they do not return phone calls, lose credits earned and make horrific mistakes in information on transcripts. The other programs were so organized and professional. I decided not to apply to the cc as I see it as an indicator of how their nursing program is run. I work very hard and have no patience for lazy people in administration at the cc. So off to a more organized school and good riddance to the cc.
    As for the attitude of the people at your orientation, "when people show you who they are, believe them the 1st time."
    Good luck to you in your career change.
    That's exactly how my CC is ... so unprofessional to the point you think animals were running the place. There's no clear direct answer from anyone (even heads and directors)... It's outlandish how government money is spent paying these workers to basically do nothing. I really am at the point with my school where I keep counting down the days until I'm done. I mean my biggest issue is advising. Advisers should be there to answer your questions about courses... not at my school. It's a free for all filled with do this do that... ALL misinformation.
  8. 0
    Quote from jo'ee
    Yeah, I agree with you on that point. It is annoying. In one of my classes this went on but the most unreal part was the student who kept asking questions that were answered repeatedly. She would then turn to the class and make faces and arm gestures like the instructor was an idiot while the instructor was answering her question for the billionth time. grrrr You wonder how students like this make it this far.

    One of the students in my class taped lectures and was always walking around school listening to the lectures, you have it right there on the tape recorder, why do you constantly need to ask.

    This is one of my biggest pet peeves in class.

    Like I said, asking immediatly doesn't even bother me as much because you might not catch part of it. But every 20 mins by different students a few times a week??

    Believe it or not, there will still be students that didn't wear their scrubs (to follow) my example, because they didn't know and YES they were in class and YES it was clarified at least 15 times BEFORE that day.

    Another one,

    Teacher says on orientation day (which NO ONE MISSED OR YOU ARE DROPPED) and at least 5 more times that week that MAJORITY as in 99% of our exams will come from our power points.

    YET a minimum of probably 200 hundred times during lecture in first semester it would be asked "will this be on the test".

    If it is on the power points it can be on the test, it's not rocket science and even if it's not on the test you still need to know it. Nursing knowledge covers more then 200 questions over a 15 week period.
  9. 1
    well, just received the news that I was accepted into my program of first choice! I started this thread based on the really bad experience I had during the orientation from my second choice school. First choice was SUNY@Buffalo ABS (accelerated) program, and second choice was a local CC associates in nursing. I hadn't heard from UB and had already been accepted to the CC so I had to go through the steps of enrollment there until I got word from my first choice. Let me say, as can be read in this thread, that the first impressions at the CC program really dissapointed and worried me. I had had pretty high hopes for the CC because it had many Pros versus Cons in my situation, and up until then all my experiences with the general school had been very good. Who knows how things would have progressed if I hadn't gotten accepted to UB and continued with the CC program...that first impression may have been invalidated over time, but what if it was a true representation of the school. I'm not willing to take that chance. I wish it was a harder decision.
    nnicolee likes this.
  10. 1
    Glad to hear that you will be attending the school of your choice. Good luck in your program. Keep us informed how things go for you.
    servewithlove likes this.


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