Too poor to become a nurse? - page 2

Hi, I am really bound and determined to go thru with this college thing- because if i dont do it now, i think i will always regret it.... BUT here's the problem- we don't really have the money... Read More

  1. by   WannaBeNrse
    Hi,

    thank you all for your advise. sometimes it just seems all so overwhelming, and when we're barely able to make ends meet as it is, i sometimes think i must be crazy and dellusional for wanting to go to college.
    i am currently doing a distance ed program in medical assisting (that one was really cheap- 800$ for the entire program and its accredited), so that will be my "back up" in case the nursing thing takes longer than expected. also, i am signed up for the CNA next month, since its a prereq anyway. i am hoping that this way, i will be able to find a decent part time job while in school.

    i dont qualify for a whole lot of scholarships, because i am not a US citizen (im a permanent resident and i believe i do qualify for pellgrant)
    what scares me most is how to organize it all- being there for the kids, work part time and go to school, and of course, pay for it all..... it seems so far out of reach. but i know that if i dont do sth now, i will regret it down the road, and the older i get the harder it will be to motivate myself to go back to school...

    thanks for all the advise!
  2. by   *Blessed2BaNRS*
    Hey there WannaBeNrse,

    Everyone on here has given excellant advise, so I am not going to duplicate what they have said, except to go for it. I am in school after graduating HS 20 years ago, and I too quit my job to focus on school. I am the mother of 4 kids, ages 7-13, so they are in constant need of clothing, shoes, etc. Since I quit, we have been hurting financially, and I have taken out school loans to get me through my first 3 semesters. To top it off, my husband is also in school full time and he too took out student loans to get through school. He just started in the fall and will go for 3 more semesters, at least, and I have applied to and hopefully will get accepted into the ADN program in the fall, so I am looking at 2 more years. We will be in debt up to our eyeballs with both of us having student loans, but is it worth it? You betcha! I am tired of scraping the bottom of the barrel each month, and seeing my kids do without when they deserve so much more. So I am going for it, regardless of what I will owe when I get out. I plan on working once I start clinicals, and my hospital will pay for part of my schooling, while paying me an income to help out with the family bills. So all is not hopeless. Nursing isn't the highest paying job out there, but it is a very good pay for someone that doesn't have it!!!

    Good luck~
    Laura
  3. by   DesertRain
    Hey Wannabenurse, a friend of mine is also a permanent resident and qualified for financial aid and for first college class scholarship (her first class was completely paid for by the school I believe) I am not sure what your situation is but she is Canadian and married to an American and just got her green card a few months ago and immediately qualified to have a whole bunch of her tuition paid so don't rule out loans completely. Another thing to take into account is you probably will really only have to pay for your first couple years of prereq's. I don't know how the demand of nurses is in your area (although the entire country is in demand) but out here where I live, if you can maintain a 3.0 average, once you get an acceptance letter from your school that validates that you are in fact a nursing student in the nursing program, you can take that letter to practically any hospital and they have "adopt-a-student" programs where they will pay for your tuition (BSN and even ADN) including books and what not in it's entirety. What's the catch? I don't even consider it a catch, it's like a win/win situation because all they do is make you sign a 2 year contract stating that you will work for them as soon as you graduate--which in turn guarantees you employment but puts experience under your belt should you want to work somewhere else. Most specialty areas require at least 1 year of experience elsewhere anyway...so like I said, win/win. If you think you might be moving somewhere else than they would just require you to pay back the tuition they sponsored you for. But, if you are already graduated and moving, you will then have the money to pay for it. Check websites of local hospitals and see if they have the program or call their HR department. That way you can keep your worrying down to a minimum and get started. Also because you will be a CNA soon, you can try to work at a hospital so you can get your foot in the door. Let them get to know you. A lot of people forget that hospitals love to pay for tuition if it means they get you back and better than ever-ie. as an RN! It's hard but if there's a will, there's a way. Don't give up hope!
    Last edit by DesertRain on Jan 29, '07
  4. by   Galore
    My advice is to just do it now! When I was getting my first degree, I started to question my decision to get a business degree in my junior/senior year, but growing up money had always been a concern and I was already freaked about the student loans I'd taken out, so I didn't want to stay in school longer and just wanted to graduate so I could earn $$. Two years later after affirming that yes, I'm really not cut out for business, I'm going back to school and it would have been easier to just take on a little more debt the first time around.

    My point is, there will always be excuses or concerns standing in the way, but for example in my case, the potential pay as a nurse is so much better that I will come out even in the first year even if I make bare minimum pay. It's wise to be cautious but there is so much help out there, take advantage of it!
  5. by   WannaBeNrse
    @ desertrain- i have heard of that program where you get all your college expenses paid in exchange for 2 years of work in a hospital that has a nursing shortage, unfortunately, this particular program is only open to US citizens. but i am trying to find a job that offers tuition reimbursement. i work "on call" for several group homes for troubled kids and for people with developmental disabilities (this is actually what i want to do as a nurse, too) and my jobs dont offer any assitance, but i know alot of these direct support jobs do, so i keep looking.

    I also married an american, i am from Germany. i've been here two years now, so at least i only have to pay in-state tuition, but here in Minnesota, thats still high enough.

    But everyone who responded to my post is probably right- it will be worth it in the end. my kids are really little, they're 1 & 3 right now, so when i am done they'll still be young (probably about 6 & 8 if things go somewhat like i plan). i figure they dont get really expensive until they're teenagers, so i got some time yet ;-)

    Thanks again to everyone for the pick-me up - i really needed it. and also thanks for the poem you posted the other day, desert rain :-)
  6. by   DesertRain
    You're welcome! And I'm glad you are making a good move forward for yourself. A lot of times you programs may say that they are for Americans only because they don't want someone from another country to take the money and run back home. With my friend she has qualified for so much just for presenting her paperwork stating that she was applying for permanent residency. I know it's different state to state but I bet if you do some research you will find some help! Good luck, I know you can do it!
  7. by   rnmomtobe2010
    I understand completely. I was married to a dead beat and I messed up big time with financial aid. I have to succesfully complete 33 semester hours before aid will consider letting me do an appeal. God can do ANYTHING but FAIL!!! I have 2 beautiful kids and a wonderful husband who is supporting me and by the way paying for my tuition:chuckle I love him dearly. Your children are all the more reason to go for it. I thought my dreams were over. I was so wrong. I am excited about starting school this summer.
  8. by   xt1
    Here's a crazy Idea:

    Think about it not as getting in debt but as investing your money for a greater return in the future. Its like putting money into a savings account and getting paid interest but with education you get a bigger percentage.
  9. by   nycstudent
    if you become a nurse through a hospital program they may pay for the education and give you a job when you get out. Some hospitals are so hard up that they'll even give you a stipend. Check out hospital nursing websites, talk to someone in their Human resources depts. They will steer you in the right direction.
  10. by   babsnchrist
    Finanacial aid from FAFSA would be your best bet. Have you looked at community colleges? They will put you in a two year program to be certified then you take your licensing exam. I have used a bank loan, and a couple other loans. Try to avoid those if possible. Also, are there CNA jobs in your area that will train and pay you? Look into those as well.
  11. by   ChargeNurseAmy74
    Quote from babsnchrist
    Finanacial aid from FAFSA would be your best bet. Have you looked at community colleges? They will put you in a two year program to be certified then you take your licensing exam. I have used a bank loan, and a couple other loans. Try to avoid those if possible. Also, are there CNA jobs in your area that will train and pay you? Look into those as well.


    I agree with Babsnchrist...FAFSA is your best bet! Its simple to do also..it well worth the time & effort!!
  12. by   DUECSON
    Someone mentioned FAFSA, go to fafsa.ed.gov for the official website. You shold have your tax information with you because they will need this information. Your filed taxes are better. I believe there is a lot of scholarships that can help you also. Check to see if there is a foundation at your school for those who need financial assistance. Some schools have a foundation that little people know about. You can do it, don't allow obstacles to get in your way, because trust me things will happen, but presevere through it all. I started LPN school when my youngest was 4 weeks old. I was already hormonal, I was blessed to find a teacher that told me to fight the good fight of faith. Wow, that day I had planned on dropping out because I didn't have the money or materials that I need. The instructor made a couple of call and needless to say the dean of Instructor walked me to the book store with his own personal chheckbook. I lie not. He told me if I needed help for the rest of my program to apply for a scholarship that he was apart of the board. I got financial help every semester. Yes, I had pell, but my pell wasn't enough.
  13. by   WDWpixieRN
    Quote from WannaBeNrse
    But everyone who responded to my post is probably right- it will be worth it in the end. my kids are really little, they're 1 & 3 right now, so when i am done they'll still be young (probably about 6 & 8 if things go somewhat like i plan). i figure they dont get really expensive until they're teenagers, so i got some time yet
    Having waited until my kids were older to go back to school the first time, let me say this is a very valid point....there really is NEVER a time when your kids won't need your time -- high school was almost as demanding as the elementary years time-wise what with chauffeuring, sports, other activities, etc....and believe me, the financial demands are unbelievable compared to what I remember of my high school days!! Do this while they're young if you've got the support and understanding of your husband. The two of you won't regret it!!

close