To much time wasted on classes that have nothing to do with Nursing!!! - page 2

My personal opinion on taking classes that really do not have anything to do with nursing suck. If they focased on the nursing and passing boards maybe the pass rate for yhe nclex would be better.... Read More

  1. Visit  ddunnrn profile page
    2
    The one thing that always fascinated me about nursing is that I can use everything I've ever learned about science, culture, and just about every other branch of knowledge and philosophy in my practice, sooner or later. Especially in psych nursing, it's important to be able to reach a patient, and the more exposure to different ideas you have, the better you are able to do that. On a personal level, ii also think that a broader exposure to different ideas tends to make one more tolerant and accepting of other cultures and ideas.
    x_factor and llg like this.
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  3. Visit  katrinad profile page
    1
    I think most nurses would do better if they had a seperate pharmacology class and a medical terminology class. Not all this history and english after all we went to high school and graduated so we know how to read and write.
    phoenixnim likes this.
  4. Visit  runsalot profile page
    2
    Quote from katrinad
    I think most nurses would do better if they had a seperate pharmacology class and a medical terminology class. Not all this history and english after all we went to high school and graduated so we know how to read and write.
    I know of some professors that would disagree that college student know how to write. High school teaches you to write at a high school level. Not college.
    MissChloe and katrinad like this.
  5. Visit  Jujubees profile page
    0
    Some high schools will teach you to write better than some college classes, but on the flip side some of the writing I've read from other college students has been just surprising at how bad it was. I can see the relevance in the english classes. I haven't started a nursing program, and I hope that the chemistry I've taken will be relevant too. I've been kind of surprised at how many nursing programs do not require biochemistry. I can't imagine how that class would not be helpful!

    Quote from runsalot
    I know of some professors that would disagree that college student know how to write. High school teaches you to write at a high school level. Not college.
  6. Visit  HeatherMax profile page
    2
    Theater 101 was a waste, not sure why I needed a "fine art".
    phoenixnim and besaangel like this.
  7. Visit  Katieerin profile page
    0
    I loved history but it didn't tell me anything i will find useful in nursing so far. I do agree that writing, and computers , especially the maths and sciences.are beneficial. I think for the level of math we are doing in nursing some schools require too far advanced math for nursing. I've seen different maths with different schools.
  8. Visit  SaleishaRN profile page
    1
    Quote from RNsRWe
    Well, yes you do, actually. The work you did as a medic is not the same as the work you will, one day, be doing as a nurse. Your opening post was storming about how non-nursing classes "suck" and you wondered what they have to do with being a nurse. Achieving a college degree in nursing is of course achieving a college degree first, which is why all those classes are there. If you preferred not to have that degree, there are practical nursing courses available at trade schools that award certificates, not degrees...but the opportunities for employment aren't the same. As for the classes themselves, I assure you they will come in handy if you do become a working RN.
    EXACTLY! And anyone who is going back for a second degree in nursing (either via an associate's program, bachelor's, or - in my case - accelerated bachelor's) will tell you that those extra classes are BECAUSE you're earning a college degree. It's to fulfill your liberal arts requirements... whether you're majoring in history, english, biology, engineering, or nursing. Look up the degree requirements for any 2 or 4-year college, and you'll find this to be true across the board. Those general education classes are there to give students a well-rounded education.

    I have a bachelor's degree in biology, and my husband has one in engineering; we both had to take those so-called "useless" classes.

    ETA: For students going back for a second degree, the general education/liberal arts classes are usually waived because those requirements were met with the first degree. In this case, students jump right into their nursing coures.
    Last edit by SaleishaRN on Mar 30, '13 : Reason: add'l info
    princesax11 likes this.
  9. Visit  katrinad profile page
    0
    Quote from runsalot

    I know of some professors that would disagree that college student know how to write. High school teaches you to write at a high school level. Not college.
    I come from a family of highly educated individuals but you are probably right Not everyone does but nursing I
    Have been in medical field 25 years yes it is need. I have instructor friends that agree
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Mar 30, '13
  10. Visit  katrinad profile page
    0
    I do agree some what ,but you do not need 3-4 college classes of english..you are probably right tho not everyone knows how to write . I come a background of everyone in my family has two college degrees.
    Godd luck with your goals I am 43 and still want to continue taking classes towards my Np.
  11. Visit  MrsStudentNurse profile page
    0
    I was thinking this exact same thing at the beginning of this semester when I began my pre req math class. Then as time went on and the teacher started marking me and others off for what seemed to be minute, unimportant mistakes.

    I realized one day this is making me become a precise, observant student and hopefully nurse one day. It made me realize the classes are for more than the face value but perhaps for how they affect the neurological circuitry in our brains.
  12. Visit  maddiem profile page
    0
    I've actually learned a lot from my gen ed classes...it gives you good critical thinking skills which will be very helpful in nursing school. You have to look at it that way or else you will think its stupid. To get a bachelors degree, there is a standard that is upheld so that everyone has an equal baseline education before they start their major course work. So really the schools can't control that at all. And I think that everyone should take gen ed classes.
  13. Visit  prmenrs profile page
    0
    I'm hoping you are interested in getting an education, not just piece of paper. Gen'l Ed classes teach to think abstractly and process info in an [hopefully] unbiased way. IMO, that is the beginning of "critical thinking skills", which is essential in nursing. Basic and advanced science classes-you really can't get enough of them, I don't think. As you're working equations in Chemistry, learning the Citric-acid cycle for the umpty-zillionth time, don't forget that the same processes are taking place in your own and your pts body--understand them, and you will understand what's going wrong or right w/your patient.

    Be a little more patient-you may be taking care of me someday.
  14. Visit  Saysfaa profile page
    0
    "process info in an [hopefully] unbiased way"

    Seriously? At least you left the "hopefully" part in. This term I have sociology taught by a feminist and human development taught by a prof who recommends everyone try multiple partners before marriage. About par for the course for gen ed classes.


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