They want me to be an RN

  1. Greetings,

    I AM CONFUSED AND STARTING TO GET DEPRESSED...

    I am a secretary at a hospital in Atlanta. I've been working here for 2.5yrs now. My goal is to become an OBGYN I am very passionate about women's health. I don't see myself doing anything else for the rest of my life. I was able to shadow an M.D for a day and I witnessed a c-section with tubal ligation. That was the day that REALLY solidified my dream.

    Here is my dilemma, I'm 21 and I'm not getting any younger. I don't have a huge family support - if at all any. I take care of myself by myself. But being a secretary doesn't pay much and I've outgrown the responsibilities. All of the nurses that I work with for the past two years have been telling me that I need to go get my BSN and then take the required classes for Med school while working as a nurse since I want to become a doctor. The past two years co workers that I've started with I've seen them move up. I'm surrounded by great people doing great things. My hospital encourages education I was enrolled in school last year but since my job doesn't pay much and have to work 60+hrs a week to support my needs. I also had a family member that I was helping financially so when I would go to class I would be so drained and wasn't able to dedicate myself to my work they way I would like. So I did terrible basically wasted a whole year of school because I was failing the classes.


    Then I come to work, and I try not to be envious of other people but the coworkers that I started with are all in a nursing program. Some are half way done and some just started but the fact is I'm just mad at myself because for the past two years I could've been done with school and made something of my self by now.


    I'm scared deep down though because at first I didn't want to listen to the nurses that were saying I should be a nurse first. I wanted to take the traditional pre med route because at that time it just didn't make sense to me to become a nurse first. However, the reality is in my life I'm going to have to do something because I can't continue to be a secretary any longer.


    Would it really be beneficial for me to become an RN even though I truly want to become an M.D?
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  2. 17 Comments

  3. by   ~Mi Vida Loca~RN
    Anything can be beneficial if you're willing to see it that way. If going the traditional route is not doable for you I don't see how this is a bad idea. I have met many doctors that were first nurses, and working as a nurse first isn't going to hurt you as a doctor. If anything it might help you to be a better more well rounded doctor. If you are passionate and determined to make a dream work, you'll make it work. Even if you have to take a few detours and take longer to arrive at your destination.
  4. by   nutella
    The short answer is "no" it does not make sense.
    Nursing and medical school are very different and a BSN prepares for nursing.

    You seem to be having a lot of problems plus everything is mixed up.
    Here are things to think about :
    1. Is medical school actually realistic for you or is it just a fixed idea that somehow got stuck?
    2. How do you envision going through pre-med if you are working 60 h /week and how will you finance school?
    3. Are your grades up to par - meaning will your GPA be good enough to be considered for med school?
    4. typically, people who envision med school and are doing pre-med are very driven and do not get side tracked it sounds that the last 2.5 y or so you have focused on day to day - how would you get on track with studies/ private life and so on.
    5. There are many other professions and healthcare jobs that require less education than medical school - perhaps you should consider those as well
  5. by   ~Mi Vida Loca~RN
    I just want to note that some of my favorite doctors started off as nurses. For various reasons they couldn't do it traditionally. You can still be very driven and not be traditional. I was up against roadblock upon roadblock to become a nurse. In all it took me 7 years. (3 years spent on a wait list) I never gave up, I got over every hurdle placed in front of me until I reached my goal. That is the very meaning of being driven. I was 31 when I became a nurse.

    The education between a nurse and doctor is very very different. But if becoming a nurse is more doable for you now and you think you could enjoy it, it's not going to hurt you or prevent you from reaching your goal. Maybe you work on some of the more advanced med school pre reqs while working as a nurse. Maybe you set yourself up in a position that in your 30's you can finally achieve your doctor dream. Nothing wrong with that. I have met many docs that being a doctor was their second career.

    My point is, if this is something you truly want and you feel like you were called to do. don't let anyone talk you into giving up on it. But be realistic about your goals and maybe you can't make it work RIGHT NOW. But that doesn't mean you can't make it work in time.
  6. by   VivaLasViejas
    Although nursing and medicine are complementary, they are very different, and studying for nursing when you really want to be a doctor will almost certainly be a waste of time. You are very, very young yet, and you have a lot of time to figure things out so don't be in such a rush; medical school will be there when you're ready. Wishing you the best in your endeavors.
  7. by   AspiringMD585
    I do appreciate your response. Everything you've mentioned is what I've been told previously by co workers and friends. I do know that they're completely different fields although similar. Hence as to why I prefer to be an M.D...However, you mentioned being realistic about my goal and that's what I'm doing. So for now realistically becoming an RN makes the most sense RIGHT NOW. But I'm never going to lose sight of becoming an OBGYN.
  8. by   Atl-Murse
    Let me the truth speaker. If your grades are terrible. Med school nor nursing will be a reality. If you wasted a whole year and failed terrible your GPA will be in the crapper. Time to buckle down and face reality
  9. by   traumaRUs
    Since you are considering nursing, I've moved this to the prenursing forum
  10. by   BKLYNFRANKIE
    If your performance was terrible during your first year of college, then apply to a different college and never EVER mention the first college on your application. Just take it as a loss. Don't attempt to transfer credits. Leave it behind like a bad boyfriend.

    With regards to medical school, I guess you're trying to think of ways to make more money, right? Nursing may not be the answer. Reality is, you can't work through medical school anyway. You can keep your job and earn your undergrad online if you need flexibility. Second, you have to give up being the family savior. That can't work! You're wasting your energy working extra hours just to give it away. No ma'am! I used to be a recruiter for a medical school. You NEED to have mainly A's in your sciences with an overall GPA greater than 3.5. You won't be ready for that kind of commitment if you're taking care of other people. As far as tuition payment is concerned, max out your employer benefits and then student loan the rest...unfortunately, it's the American way. If you're planning to go to medical school, then you also need to plan on maxing out those loans...again, it's the American way. Good luck!
  11. by   Roasted.Peanuts
    Quote from BKLYNFRANKIE
    If your performance was terrible during your first year of college, then apply to a different college and never EVER mention the first college on your application. Just take it as a loss. Don't attempt to transfer credits. Leave it behind like a bad boyfriend.

    With regards to medical school, I guess you're trying to think of ways to make more money, right? Nursing may not be the answer. Reality is, you can't work through medical school anyway. You can keep your job and earn your undergrad online if you need flexibility. Second, you have to give up being the family savior. That can't work! You're wasting your energy working extra hours just to give it away. No ma'am! I used to be a recruiter for a medical school. You NEED to have mainly A's in your sciences with an overall GPA greater than 3.5. You won't be ready for that kind of commitment if you're taking care of other people. As far as tuition payment is concerned, max out your employer benefits and then student loan the rest...unfortunately, it's the American way. If you're planning to go to medical school, then you also need to plan on maxing out those loans...again, it's the American way. Good luck!
    I'm not sure if you can actually just leave your previous credits out like it never happened. If a school EVER find out it will be bad. There's also ethical issues if you do this.

    Anyway, it looks like you can't be a traditional student, so if going to nursing school seems like the right choice currently, you should go for it.
  12. by   Jess8780
    Hello,

    First of all, once you become a nurse, you won't have to work 60 hours plus since nursing has better pay. You will also get familiarized with different fields in the medical field and you will decide if that's still the route you would like to take. Follow your heart and I wish you the best of luck!
  13. by   MikeyT-c-IV
    Quote from BKLYNFRANKIE
    If your performance was terrible during your first year of college, then apply to a different college and never EVER mention the first college on your application
    In my experience most schools require transcripts from any other institution. It's very unethical and dishonest to not adhere to that requirement. I don't think this is a great way to start an adult life with adult responsibilities.

    I have a friend who started his career as an RN and then later went to medical school. It's definitely something that can be done if you really have that desire and drive to make it happen.

    Speaking personally, I'd go to medical school if that's what I really wanted to do. Why bother messing around? There are plenty of financial aid options and loans available.

    My motto is, "we have nothing but time." Don't waste yours by not doing what you want to do.
  14. by   rob95
    First of all, I just want to say that you are not alone. There are millions of people in their early twenties who sort of lost track of their long term goals so don't be so hard on yourself. I'm 22 and I just got my degree in Business but I'm going back for nursing next year. I felt just like you, like I've been wasting time while everyone else is advancing(prior to my degree). I failed two semesters in a row and I was academically dismissed but I turned my life around shortly after and finally got a degree. The advice your coworkers are giving isn't necessarily bad because nursing is a great career and its very broad in terms of career paths. And it might just be more realistic to go that route vs going the Med school route. You're right, majoring in Pre-medicine would make more logical sense vs going the nursing route because you don't really take the same courses in Nursing so essentially it would be wasting more time. There is absolutely no comparison to Nursing and Medical school, you should ask doctors and do online research and you'll see the obvious in the educational requirements. However, I feel that if you've been struggling academically and you work s lot of hours, you should just consider a career in nursing. There are numerous careers in nursing relating to likely being under the supervision of an OBGYN. Nursing programs are very flexible which could allow you to balance work and attend school. Nothing worth having comes easy so you're determination has to e through the roof but I'd suggest going the nursing route. Whatever you decide, good luck!!!

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They want me to be an RN