There has to be an easier way....

  1. 0 I was currently going to school for IT but that was terribly boring so I went to my second choice, nursing. I was thinking about taking the LPN program at Erie 1 Boces but thought why wouldn't I go straight for my bachelors to become an RN. I have completed a majority of my prerequisites so I mind as well go for the BSN right? What do you guys think about that?
  2. Visit  MissLipsz profile page

    About MissLipsz

    Joined Jul '13; Posts: 13; Likes: 7.

    43 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  LadyFree28 profile page
    2
    Go for the BSN. Find out what other pre-req's you need for a couple of colleges in the are, if you want to, get your associates (decreases the chance to take classes over) and get the BSN.
    AkatieL and Marshall1 like this.
  4. Visit  AnthonySmith profile page
    6
    First you need to stop and think about why you want to be a nurse... Do not do it for the money, Nurses work long hours and are on their feet all day. You will very rarely be sitting at a computer. Going to nursing school is much like a job you have to miss out on all the parties and having a social life is mostly a no no you will have no time, it is even worse going for a BSN.

    Second, you seem a little confused as to what a LVN, RN, and BSN are... You do not get a BSN to become a RN, a RN is also known as ADN and is an associates not a bachelors. You get the BSN mainly to become a manager or head nurse somewhere BSN and ADN are the same classes you just take more administrative and management courses as a BSN.

    and Last not to be rude, but nursing is very competitive at some schools over 1000 people apply and they take 55-80 students, so having great grammar skills is a must( you do not become "an RN" you become "a RN")
  5. Visit  claritasd profile page
    8
    I've seen plenty of worse grammar on here than "an RN." Besides, I personally think "an RN'" "an MS," "an MIT student," etc are grey areas. Also, there are run-on sentences in your post about grammar.


    Whether you go for the LPN or the BSN depends on what you want. If you just want to be a nurse and be done with it, do the LPN. If you want a bachelor's, either because you're thinking about a future MS degree or because you just want to complete the BS, then go for that. If you have the time/means to finish the BSN, it might be a good idea if you think there's even a possibility you might want to go back for advanced MS-level training in the future.

    Good luck making your decision!
    sno87, mayki, Kimbsntobe, and 5 others like this.
  6. Visit  Mchs4735 profile page
    2
    I agree with the lady above....the guy above have a lot grammer errors in his post. And he should not just assume people want to become an RN just for the money. She asked what she should do not your opinion on grammar and what an RN does at work. Im pretty sure she already know what nurses do!
    mayki and Kimbsntobe like this.
  7. Visit  Mchs4735 profile page
    1
    Oh and just for your info people need BSN for jobs these days and not just an ADN. People get BSN to further their education not to be in management position. If you want a management position, you need to get a MSN or go to be a nurse practioner.
    Kimbsntobe likes this.
  8. Visit  loriangel14 profile page
    6
    [Second, you seem a little confused as to what a LVN, RN, and BSN are... You do not get a BSN to become a RN, a RN is also known as ADN and is an associates not a bachelors. You get the BSN mainly to become a manager or head nurse somewhere BSN and ADN are the same classes you just take more administrative and management courses as a BSN.]

    Not exactly. RN is the title.There are two ways to become an RN.Either a 2 year Associates or a 4 year BSN.BSN is not just to become a manager, many places are looking for BSN only when hiring these days.Many are getting a BSN just to get a job.
    mayki, anashenwrath, NurseDirtyBird, and 3 others like this.
  9. Visit  Ebony2013 profile page
    1
    I agree ladies. I work as a medic in the ER and I see a lot of ADN new grads that cannot get a job after school. A lot of hospitals are looking for BSN these days. What ever you choose to do just make sure you do the research. Know the schools pass rate on the NCLEX, know what your area hospitals are looking for ADN or BSN. Really plan to have the time to dedicate to your major because being a nursing student can be the hardest job u have. Good luck
    phoenixnim likes this.
  10. Visit  csmcj profile page
    22
    Quote from clairefromsandiego
    I've seen plenty of worse grammar on here than "an RN." Besides, I personally think "an RN'" "an MS," "an MIT student," etc are grey areas. Also, there are run-on sentences in your post about grammar.
    I'm just gonna go off topic here a bit a dust off my previous non nursing education in linguistics.

    The rule governing the use of "a/an" is "a"-->"an"/__[vowel] which would be spoken as "a" (the default) becomes "an" (the variant) when it occurs before a vowel at the word boundary. It's important to distinguish here that we're talking about phonetic vowels, not graphemic vowels. Therefore, it would be correct to say "a registered nurse" because the "r" in "registered" is both graphemically and phonetically a consonant (the phonetic consonant in this case being a retroflex velar approximant). However, if you're using the initials "RN," it's pronounced similar to "arr en" in spoken English. Since the word boundary in this case is phonetically a vowel (a back unrounded open vowel) even though it is graphemically a consonant, "an" is appropriate to use.

    TL;DR: it's "a registered nurse" and "an RN."

    *stepping off my soapbox*

    Thus endeth the lesson
    MyWorld, Madras, mayki, and 19 others like this.
  11. Visit  MissLipsz profile page
    4
    Quote from csmcj
    I'm just gonna go off topic here a bit a dust off my previous non nursing education in linguistics.

    The rule governing the use of "a/an" is "a"-->"an"/__[vowel] which would be spoken as "a" (the default) becomes "an" (the variant) when it occurs before a vowel at the word boundary. It's important to distinguish here that we're talking about phonetic vowels, not graphemic vowels. Therefore, it would be correct to say "a registered nurse" because the "r" in "registered" is both graphemically and phonetically a consonant (the phonetic consonant in this case being a retroflex velar approximant). However, if you're using the initials "RN," it's pronounced similar to "arr en" in spoken English. Since the word boundary in this case is phonetically a vowel (a back unrounded open vowel) even though it is graphemically a consonant, "an" is appropriate to use.

    TL;DR: it's "a registered nurse" and "an RN."

    *stepping off my soapbox*

    Thus endeth the lesson
    Thanks haha I know my grammar isn't the best but I know the basics
    Atlhonee, 1feistymama, applewhitern, and 1 other like this.
  12. Visit  MissLipsz profile page
    0
    Thank you ladies and gents for your replies. Oh and taking up for me in regards to my bad grammar haha.
  13. Visit  sjalv profile page
    6
    Quote from AnthonySmith
    First you need to stop and think about why you want to be a nurse... Do not do it for the money, Nurses work long hours and are on their feet all day. You will very rarely be sitting at a computer. Going to nursing school is much like a job you have to miss out on all the parties and having a social life is mostly a no no you will have no time, it is even worse going for a BSN.

    Second, you seem a little confused as to what a LVN, RN, and BSN are... You do not get a BSN to become a RN, a RN is also known as ADN and is an associates not a bachelors. You get the BSN mainly to become a manager or head nurse somewhere BSN and ADN are the same classes you just take more administrative and management courses as a BSN.

    and Last not to be rude, but nursing is very competitive at some schools over 1000 people apply and they take 55-80 students, so having great grammar skills is a must( you do not become "an RN" you become "a RN")
    Your lack of punctuation and apparent ignorance on when to capitalize letters leaves you little room to talk. Also, it's "an RN", not "a RN". The letter 'r' is pronounced 'ar', which begins with a vowel sound, so 'an' is the article used here. Also, many floor nurses have their BSNs. Believe it or not, not everyone wants to go into management.
  14. Visit  claritasd profile page
    0
    Hahaha awesome thanks. That's what I thought, but it's been a long time since I took a linguistics class!

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