Pre-Nursing Worries - Anyone Else Experiencing This? - page 3

by usfgirl 2,827 Views | 27 Comments

Okay, so I am going to try to sum this up in the most efficient way possible... I am on my last semester of pre-reqs and am also in the process of filling out apps to FL schools (BSN programs) for fall 2013. I initially got... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from itsdoc2u
    Taking a Hybrid A&P class... 4 hour lab once a week. Sucks twice as much but classes filled up and I didn't want to wait another year to be able to apply to the nursing program. Ugh! So far I'm bombing!!! I can't afford to fail!!!
    I know what you're saying...definitely cannot afford to fail but felt the pressure to get pre-reqs done ASAP. It's rough! Good luck with your hybrid course though
  2. 0
    Hey if you are stressed about your prereqs know that once you're done with them it is a thing of the past. Something much more stressful than prereqs is your first year as a nurse, those times when you are on the floor and gotta come up with solutions, no more teachers or classmates, just you and your knowledge.

    According to my experience nursing is something that gets progressively harder as you move along culminating with your first year as a nurse as the hardest part, expect your life to be changed by this process and expect to question yourself if nursing was right for u even after u graduate.

    Good luck!
  3. 0
    If you enjoy your volunteer work, like what you see nurses doing, and imagine yourself liking it too, then that is very good in terms of how much you will enjoy actually being a nurse, which I think, is the most important question. Taking pre-reqs on-line is brutal. And if you don't enjoy the pre-reqs, you'll likely hate nursing school. However, find one person who loved nursing school, and I'll alert the press! It's fast paced, overwhelming, and half the instructors have a personal agenda. Some of them will deliberately make your life difficult, guaranteed. That said, it comes to a close eventually, and you're done. I agree with you, I don't like the job prospects. Low pay doesn't sound good either. If I had known the economy would tank early on, I've asked myself that question. Would I have still pursued it? And as with you, I can't think of anything better to do given my interests and temperament. At least in nursing school, you'll find everyone is in the same boat as you, with the same pressures, the same worries. You'll develop a support group of peers at school that you don't have now, on-line. It's no wonder you feel so alone.
  4. 0
    Quote from European
    Hey if you are stressed about your prereqs know that once you're done with them it is a thing of the past. Something much more stressful than prereqs is your first year as a nurse, those times when you are on the floor and gotta come up with solutions, no more teachers or classmates, just you and your knowledge.

    According to my experience nursing is something that gets progressively harder as you move along culminating with your first year as a nurse as the hardest part, expect your life to be changed by this process and expect to question yourself if nursing was right for u even after u graduate.

    Good luck!
    Thanks for your insight. I have heard people say that you couldn't pay them to re-live their first year after nursing school! I'm just a little worried that I am questioning nursing school before I begin nursing school. I appreciate your honest advice very much. I think it's better to know what to expect, rather than wish you had known!
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    Quote from Isthisforreal?
    If you enjoy your volunteer work, like what you see nurses doing, and imagine yourself liking it too, then that is very good in terms of how much you will enjoy actually being a nurse, which I think, is the most important question. Taking pre-reqs on-line is brutal. And if you don't enjoy the pre-reqs, you'll likely hate nursing school. However, find one person who loved nursing school, and I'll alert the press! It's fast paced, overwhelming, and half the instructors have a personal agenda. Some of them will deliberately make your life difficult, guaranteed. That said, it comes to a close eventually, and you're done. I agree with you, I don't like the job prospects. Low pay doesn't sound good either. If I had known the economy would tank early on, I've asked myself that question. Would I have still pursued it? And as with you, I can't think of anything better to do given my interests and temperament. At least in nursing school, you'll find everyone is in the same boat as you, with the same pressures, the same worries. You'll develop a support group of peers at school that you don't have now, on-line. It's no wonder you feel so alone.
    Thank you so much for your response! Let me ask you a silly question then: Is it okay to hate nursing school? Or is the fact that I hate my pre-reqs a deal breaker for me, in your opinion?

    Also, a more pressing question - if you don't mind answering. Knowing what you know now about job prospects, lower wages, and with your current nursing experience, would you have still pursued it?

    While I do have these questions, so much of what you said has brought me some peace. I am so happy to know that, if I go into nursing, I will be with people in the same situation...it's hard to remember that sometimes. I do feel so alone. Your encouragement means so much to me!
  6. 0
    Quote from phoenixnim
    I waver sometimes, because science has never been a strong suite for me. But my end goal isn't nursing, it's nurse-midwifery. Which sometimes helps push through, and other times I get agitated wondering why I need to clog my brain with so much stuff. I could just become a direct-entry midwife, instead of going through all of this schooling, but I feel I could make a greater impact on my community by going for my masters instead.

    Sorry for rambling. But I hear you on dreadful trudge through pre-reqs. Have you taken any career tests? Most schools offer a full career/personality matching test. They can be pretty helpful.
    I so agree with these sentiments. My ultimate goal is to be a mental health nurse practitioner and so much of the science feels slightly irrelevant, like it would be better to be learning just counseling skills, pharm and neurophysiology. Oh, well!
  7. 0
    It is perfectly fine to hate nursing school. It's hard not to hate it. The pre-reqs were grueling, although I did enjoy the pre-req subjects. But, I'm not sure how much I would have enjoyed taking them on-line. Part of what made A&P enjoyable and interesting was the enthusiasm of the instructor. I think you need to pinpoint why you hate your pre-reqs. If you don't have any interest in the subject, then that might be a problem. But having all that information come at you in a two-dimensional way, flat, without added instruction, could really make it seem like a tedious burden, which is never any fun. I would have pursued it just the same knowing what I do now. However, I would have entered into it with a different attitude. That is, just roll with the punches. It sucks, there's a tremendous amount of BS, but, I know I make a difference in people's lives just by helping with a smile and being kind to them, and by having needed skills. You said you're a compassionate person who enjoys the appreciation of patients and accepts negative family members as part of the condition of working around people who are stressed and irritable. That is key, because if you can't handle the work environment, loving pre-reqs and nursing school won't do you any good. You got "A"'s in both A&P. Good for you! You may have hated it, but you mastered it. That's all nursing school is about. It's not enjoyable, for the most part, but there will be good moments, mostly when you perform direct patient care during clinical rotations. And trust me, everyone will have the same complaints, the same worries, the same exhaustion. The economy is poor right now, but things will pick up eventually. As an 85 year old man once said when asked about his secrete to success, he replied, "Being in the right place, at the right time, with the right stuff". You're in the right place, it's not a great time, but that will likely improve. Getting your RN license is the stuff. What helped me through was continuous encouragement - people telling me to hang in there, that I'll be a great nurse, that I'm smart, resourceful, with an incredible will. I think I would have made it without that, but it sure felt good to my soul to hear it from others. You need that support. It is essential that you have encouragement and emotional support through it. It's very tough.
  8. 0
    Quote from Isthisforreal?
    It is perfectly fine to hate nursing school. It's hard not to hate it. The pre-reqs were grueling, although I did enjoy the pre-req subjects. But, I'm not sure how much I would have enjoyed taking them on-line. Part of what made A&P enjoyable and interesting was the enthusiasm of the instructor. I think you need to pinpoint why you hate your pre-reqs. If you don't have any interest in the subject, then that might be a problem. But having all that information come at you in a two-dimensional way, flat, without added instruction, could really make it seem like a tedious burden, which is never any fun. I would have pursued it just the same knowing what I do now. However, I would have entered into it with a different attitude. That is, just roll with the punches. It sucks, there's a tremendous amount of BS, but, I know I make a difference in people's lives just by helping with a smile and being kind to them, and by having needed skills. You said you're a compassionate person who enjoys the appreciation of patients and accepts negative family members as part of the condition of working around people who are stressed and irritable. That is key, because if you can't handle the work environment, loving pre-reqs and nursing school won't do you any good. You got "A"'s in both A&P. Good for you! You may have hated it, but you mastered it. That's all nursing school is about. It's not enjoyable, for the most part, but there will be good moments, mostly when you perform direct patient care during clinical rotations. And trust me, everyone will have the same complaints, the same worries, the same exhaustion. The economy is poor right now, but things will pick up eventually. As an 85 year old man once said when asked about his secrete to success, he replied, "Being in the right place, at the right time, with the right stuff". You're in the right place, it's not a great time, but that will likely improve. Getting your RN license is the stuff. What helped me through was continuous encouragement - people telling me to hang in there, that I'll be a great nurse, that I'm smart, resourceful, with an incredible will. I think I would have made it without that, but it sure felt good to my soul to hear it from others. You need that support. It is essential that you have encouragement and emotional support through it. It's very tough.
    I think you are right about the online course...I used to enjoy school so much, especially because of the interaction with my teachers. I have had many professors whose quirks and personalities fit the subject they were teaching so well, and in turn, I learned more. I just don't get to have that in my online classes. And usually, when I finally get down to doing my readings and homework, I am pretty interested in much of what I am doing, so that's a good thing.

    I can agree with you wholeheartedly as I am quickly finding out how much support really does help you. I don't have an overwhelming amount of support right now, but I am still lucky to have a few people in my life who are always pouring encouragement into me and telling me I'm going to make a great nurse. I even had a patient's family member tell me that! Made my life!!! I will never, ever forget that person. So far, "roll with the punches" is my attitude. I'm not completely sure what I am getting myself into, but I am preparing in the best ways I can. Right now, I am waiting on a few admissions decisions for next fall, and I'm not quitting. I have to know how this turns out.

    Just so you know, conversations like these help me remember - in the midst of my anxiety and piles of homework - why I wanted to be a nurse in the first place.

    And that 85 year old man is awesome - he is so right.


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