Nursing shortage! Nursing program waiting lists!

  1. I am working on completion of my pre reqs for the ADN program at my local CC. I am a little concerned over the fact that upon my app. I will be placed into a random selection pool. One-third of the class will be alternates from the previous year .Two-thirds will be new apps. I knew what I was walking into, however I just don't understand why. There is a nursing shortage and such high demand for nurses. Why don't we have more programs to educate those who are ready, willing and able. I live in CA. Are other states in the same boat? I'm a mom of three . 33 years old. I work PT and attend classes. Just curious about what others have to say about this issue.
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  2. 52 Comments

  3. by   Maggie in NC
    The lack of nursing educators has limited the number of applicants. There are very few incentives for nurses to get an MBA and go teach for less than they can make working. That's been a HUGE contributing factor to the shortage.
  4. by   Faeriewand
    Quote from melpip3
    I am working on completion of my pre reqs for the ADN program at my local CC. I am a little concerned over the fact that upon my app. I will be placed into a random selection pool. One-third of the class will be alternates from the previous year .Two-thirds will be new apps. I knew what I was walking into, however I just don't understand why. There is a nursing shortage and such high demand for nurses. Why don't we have more programs to educate those who are ready, willing and able. I live in CA. Are other states in the same boat? I'm a mom of three . 33 years old. I work PT and attend classes. Just curious about what others have to say about this issue.
    I'm in San Diego and the wait list here is 2 years for the community colleges. You can get in but you have to wait. SDSU is tough to get into also even tho they have no wait list because they run by points. The higher the grades the more points. Plus way more pre-reqs and you have to do something extra like volunteer in a hospital setting or be a girl scout leader or something for more points to be able to make it in because it is so competitive. Guess its' pretty much the same all across the country.

    FW
  5. by   KrisRNwannabe
    when i got on the waitlist I was number 500. this would be a 4 year wait. I have now heard it crept up over 800 before lots of people dropped off. since there are only 3 schools in my county i now drive 60 miles one way. i just happen to get into this school before the waitlist started now they are 2-3 year wait. it is very unfortunate that schools have a hard time finding instructors.
  6. by   foxfire65
    Quote from KrisRNwannabe
    when i got on the waitlist I was number 500. this would be a 4 year wait. I have now heard it crept up over 800 before lots of people dropped off. since there are only 3 schools in my county i now drive 60 miles one way. i just happen to get into this school before the waitlist started now they are 2-3 year wait. it is very unfortunate that schools have a hard time finding instructors.
    Was wondering what county you were in? I am in Wayne Co., Michigan. It is similar here, except the cc I am in supposedly admits 240 students per year, but it is on a lottery also and they say you must have A's and B's in pre reqs to get in. Although I have heard they allow some C students in. I am thinking of transferring to another cc or university.
  7. by   melpip3
    Quote from foxfire65
    Was wondering what county you were in? I am in Wayne Co., Michigan. It is similar here, except the cc I am in supposedly admits 240 students per year, but it is on a lottery also and they say you must have A's and B's in pre reqs to get in. Although I have heard they allow some C students in. I am thinking of transferring to another cc or university.


    I'm in Sacramento, Co. Calif.
  8. by   smckenzi
    in michigan where i live the cc closest is the only one with a nursing program for at least 90 miles so needless to say there is a long waiting list...about 3 years and 1 1/2 years to get into the pre-nursing program and once you are in that you have to maintain a 3.0 gpa and preferably straight a's in all pre-reqs. :angryfire
  9. by   SusanJean
    Another option besides the cc is considering the private schools. While they require a great deal of tuition, most offer substantial scholarships for high GPA's in addition to other financial options.

    Often there are no waiting lists.

    A friend of mine was looking at a 3 yr wait at a jr. college -- and finally figured that she would be loosing money going that route (a substantial amount) vs the private college where she could get immediate acceptance. (She was working as a paramedic.) While the initial tuition was prohibitive, they offered her a scholarship for her high GPA, and she took loans for the rest. She will complete her degree before she would have started at the cc.

    I applied to a different private college that immediately knocked 4000 off the tuition for GPA -

    So the "sticker shock" is not so bad - all the rest is managable, many loans are forgivable in nursing.

    I know this is not an option for everyone, but I think it is worth considering for many. Do not dismiss it without going in, discussing w/ the nursing admissions and financial aid office. You never know what they have available.
    SJ
  10. by   llg
    Quote from SusanJean
    Another option besides the cc is considering the private schools. While they require a great deal of tuition, most offer substantial scholarships for high GPA's in addition to other financial options.
    ...

    I know this is not an option for everyone, but I think it is worth considering for many. Do not dismiss it without going in, discussing w/ the nursing admissions and financial aid office. You never know what they have available.
    SJ
    Very sensible advice. Sometimes, the "more expensive" private school is actually cheaper in the long run because of the financial assistance available and because of the ability to graduate faster and get out in the workforce sooner. You can use the money you earn in those "extra earning years" to pay back any student loans.

    The trick is: to be disciplined enough to not spend those first paychecks on rewards for yourself for graduation. I've seen lots of people spend lots of money on "fun stuff" in that first year or two after school and end up with big debts 5 years later. They say, "I deserve this" for all the hard work they did in school -- but they forget about the burden of the long-term debt. They would be better off continuing to live like a "poor struggling student" for another year or two and pay off the debt.

    llg
  11. by   RMA2RN
    Quote from llg
    Very sensible advice. Sometimes, the "more expensive" private school is actually cheaper in the long run because of the financial assistance available and because of the ability to graduate faster and get out in the workforce sooner. You can use the money you earn in those "extra earning years" to pay back any student loans.

    The trick is: to be disciplined enough to not spend those first paychecks on rewards for yourself for graduation. I've seen lots of people spend lots of money on "fun stuff" in that first year or two after school and end up with big debts 5 years later. They say, "I deserve this" for all the hard work they did in school -- but they forget about the burden of the long-term debt. They would be better off continuing to live like a "poor struggling student" for another year or two and pay off the debt.

    llg
  12. by   LesaRNdreams
    I attend a CC too and the main problem is instructors. There isn't enough of them. Why would they want to teach making maybe 30K a year when they can work in the hospital and make double or more? That is the problem. Many of the instructors at my CC work full time during the day then teach part time at night. They couldn't get by otherwise just as a teacher. ---We are suppose to have 120 day slots and 60 evening slots, but if they do not have enough teachers they cut down the spots. I am awaiting readmittance into N2 clinicals. I was told readmittance is on seat availablity basis and whom ever has the highest GPA will get the spot. It was suggested that I apply to other local CC's, but the ones closest to me only take 20 students because they only have 2 instructors, also, their college requires courses that mine does not. I have also looked into my local hospitals as they have fulltime programs, the cost is outrageous! Good luck, don't give up!
  13. by   RMA2RN
    Quote from llg
    Very sensible advice. Sometimes, the "more expensive" private school is actually cheaper in the long run because of the financial assistance available and because of the ability to graduate faster and get out in the workforce sooner. You can use the money you earn in those "extra earning years" to pay back any student loans.

    The trick is: to be disciplined enough to not spend those first paychecks on rewards for yourself for graduation. I've seen lots of people spend lots of money on "fun stuff" in that first year or two after school and end up with big debts 5 years later. They say, "I deserve this" for all the hard work they did in school -- but they forget about the burden of the long-term debt. They would be better off continuing to live like a "poor struggling student" for another year or two and pay off the debt.

    llg

    That was a very good point you made, why not pay off your debt first instead of adding to it as soon as you graduate from nursing school.
  14. by   Achoo!
    I amin Wisconsin, and our wait is 2-4 years at the technical colleges.

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