Nursing not for me?

  1. Hello all, I am new to the boards, but I did register some time ago.
    Anyway, I have run into a dilemma. I am a good student, I have a 4.0GPA, and so on and so forth. Back in january of this year, my brother got into a car accident, and was put into a coma with severe injuries. He went to MUSC, and when I had gone to visit him, it was extremely hard for me, I started getting nauseus and started getting very hot. I ended up passing out for a few seconds once I got back into the waiting room (He was in ICU). I am just wondering if maybe the hospital environment is to much for me, or if it was just because of emotional reasons. The second time I went in there I felt quite hot, but not to the extent of passing out like the previous time. Ever since than I have been fine, but I am just wondering if this would happen later on when I am a nurse.
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   Jessy_RN
    Not sure what to advice. Could it have been that since it was your relative you passed out?

    Try shadowing a nurse or volunteering before you make a decision. Best wishes to you and welcome.
  4. by   stpauligirl
    Quote from NathanDH
    Hello all, I am new to the boards, but I did register some time ago.
    Anyway, I have run into a dilemma. I am a good student, I have a 4.0GPA, and so on and so forth. Back in january of this year, my brother got into a car accident, and was put into a coma with severe injuries. He went to MUSC, and when I had gone to visit him, it was extremely hard for me, I started getting nauseus and started getting very hot. I ended up passing out for a few seconds once I got back into the waiting room (He was in ICU). I am just wondering if maybe the hospital environment is to much for me, or if it was just because of emotional reasons. The second time I went in there I felt quite hot, but not to the extent of passing out like the previous time. Ever since than I have been fine, but I am just wondering if this would happen later on when I am a nurse.
    Isn't it that doctors and nurses shouldn't treat/take care of anyone they have emotional ties to? If you don't personally know the people you will care for it might be different, and you will be better at handling the situation.
    Nursing school, I bet will prepare us for this, so don't give up on becoming a nurse. I hope your brother is doing well.
  5. by   minnielynn
    Quote from NathanDH
    Hello all, I am new to the boards, but I did register some time ago.
    Anyway, I have run into a dilemma. I am a good student, I have a 4.0GPA, and so on and so forth. Back in january of this year, my brother got into a car accident, and was put into a coma with severe injuries. He went to MUSC, and when I had gone to visit him, it was extremely hard for me, I started getting nauseus and started getting very hot. I ended up passing out for a few seconds once I got back into the waiting room (He was in ICU). I am just wondering if maybe the hospital environment is to much for me, or if it was just because of emotional reasons. The second time I went in there I felt quite hot, but not to the extent of passing out like the previous time. Ever since than I have been fine, but I am just wondering if this would happen later on when I am a nurse.
    My brother was hit by a car a few years ago and I remember going in to see him , I will never forget how I got, my airway felt stuck, I couldn't breath and when I finally did breath all I could do was scream. It was horrible, but I think that happened because that was my brother. I work at a hospital now, and I see things, but its different, when its your loved one. I still have sympathy for the patient , ofcourse, but I won't sob uncontrollably like I did for my brother. Thank God he pulled through, he is fine now. I hope your brother pulls through as well. Good luck, take care.


    Lynn
  6. by   Fun2, RN, BSN
    Years ago my grandmother fell in a dept. store and pulled my grandfather down with her.

    They both had gashes on their foreheads, in which required both of them to be transported by ambulance to the ER. In the ER, I watched my grandmother get sutured up without a problem, but started feeling a little warm when the Dr. began to suture my grandfather's head up. I had to go out of the room, and get a damp paper towel to wipe my forehead. After I calmed down, I went back in and was fine watching the rest of the "surgery". lol

    I've never felt that way with anything else as a medical assistant, and I have seen plenty of blood/cuts/gashes/abrasions, etc.

    I really think it is because of the fear you feel b/c it's your loved one.


    I also hope your brother is ok, and that you do not give up.
    Last edit by Fun2, RN, BSN on Dec 7, '05
  7. by   Nutmeg5575
    I agree with everyone else. I have heard and read over and over that it is very different when you know/love/are friends with the person who is injured. Try volunteering some at a hospital before you make any drastic decisions.
  8. by   tencat
    I can deal with everyone else's crises (Puking, cuts, etc.) but I'm USELESS with my own child. My husband thinks it's pretty funny that I'm the one who is going to be a nurse, yet I always call him for help with puke incidents, be they kid or cat! Ah, well....I guess I'm saying that how you react to family and how you react when it is a job with those you are not really close to can be two different things.
  9. by   Annabelle57
    i think you will be an excellent nurse, nathandh. great nurses are also compassionate nurses... and of course it would be difficult to see your brother like this. likewise, the memory of his accident and what it was like to see him in the hospital probably was a hard memory to shake, so it's also understandable that subsequent visits would be a little difficult as well, although not as bad as the first. i know 110% that i am called to be an rn... and yet, i think i would completely pass out or go into hysterics if my patient was, say, my brother, my mom, or my husband. i could never do it. however, i've shadowed several nurses - the most recent in a level iii nicu - and i absolutely loved it. in fact, i felt frustrated that i didn't have the skills to jump in and help while i was there! so, i think it's an emotional connection that made being in a hospital so difficult.

    the earlier poster who suggested a job shadow - try that. there are lots of areas of nursing, so don't feel you have to do, say, trauma icu if that would be too much for you. also, being an rn doesn't necessarily relegate you to a hospital - there are so many other places that need nurses!

    i hope this helps... and we're always here if you have other questions or doubts.
  10. by   danu3
    Quote from NathanDH
    Hello all, I am new to the boards, but I did register some time ago.
    Anyway, I have run into a dilemma. I am a good student, I have a 4.0GPA, and so on and so forth. Back in january of this year, my brother got into a car accident, and was put into a coma with severe injuries. He went to MUSC, and when I had gone to visit him, it was extremely hard for me, I started getting nauseus and started getting very hot. I ended up passing out for a few seconds once I got back into the waiting room (He was in ICU). I am just wondering if maybe the hospital environment is to much for me, or if it was just because of emotional reasons. The second time I went in there I felt quite hot, but not to the extent of passing out like the previous time. Ever since than I have been fine, but I am just wondering if this would happen later on when I am a nurse.
    I think all the other posts are right, it probably has something to do with fact that it is someone you love.

    This reminded of one of my uncle who is a surgeon. The story goes that the first time he went into the surgery room, he fainted. Actually he fainted like 2 or 3 times.

    If my uncle can become a surgeon after fainting multiple times, you can become a nurse.

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