Nursing Accreditation Info

  1. I know this has been brought up many times, but I am still slightly confused. I was accepted to Northwest Michigan in Traverse city in the ADN program for Spring Semester. The program is accrediated by the nursing boards of michigan and Michigan Nursing League. However I notice that it is not accreditated by nln or ccne. To some I notice that these two agencys are very important in getting a job and trying to further a career. Northwest said the agencies are too expensive and all it matters is that Michigan board of nursing and North Central Association recognizes the school. I plan to pursue a BSN maybe in state or out of state. How much will this be a factor in applying to a BSN program? Thank you

    Matt
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   llg
    You're asking a very good question -- and seem to have a pretty good understanding of the situation. The fact that the State Board has approved the school simply means that its graduates are eligible to take the NCLEX test and become an RN. From a legal perspective, that's all you need to practice as an RN.

    However, the NLN accreditation (CCNE only accredits BSN programs, not ADN.) is a "stamp of approval" from a professional organization that is very important to a lot of people. Some programs that meet the legal "bare minimum" requirements for RN programs don't meet the NLN standards and it might matter when you apply for a BSN program later. Some schools will not accept the credits of a non-accredited program ... or they may accept them, but you may have a little more trouble getting accepted into the school if there is a lot of competition for a limited number of spaces.

    If you are thinking of going on for more education and/or moving out of state, I would recommend attending an NLN or CCNE accredited school if it is at all possible. While it might not matter, depending on the school you choose to attend later, it just might matter. Do you really want to take a chance and gamble with it?

    What exactly is the Michigan Nursing League? Is it a state branch of a larger network of leagues? I would investigate what the Michigan Nursing League before I would assume it was just as accepted as the NLN. Maybe you could call or write to a few BSN programs that might interest you to see what they say.
    Last edit by llg on Nov 21, '07
  4. by   nurz2be
    Quote from Murock
    I know this has been brought up many times, but I am still slightly confused. I was accepted to Northwest Michigan in Traverse city in the ADN program for Spring Semester. The program is accrediated by the nursing boards of michigan and Michigan Nursing League. However I notice that it is not accreditated by nln or ccne. To some I notice that these two agencys are very important in getting a job and trying to further a career. Northwest said the agencies are too expensive and all it matters is that Michigan board of nursing and North Central Association recognizes the school. I plan to pursue a BSN maybe in state or out of state. How much will this be a factor in applying to a BSN program? Thank you

    Matt

    Matt,

    Here are the websites for the accreditation mentioned by the above poster. My college, which is an associates program, is recognized by the NLN so when I am ready to obtain my Bachelors, my credits and degree will be recognized and I won't have a hard time obtaining my further education. It is easy to decide to find a school as long as it will accept you and if you don't plan on furthering that diploma or associates degree at a later time that is ok. If you intend on getting your BSN or MSN, as I do, in the future it is REALLY important to investigate the accreditation of that school. Although there are a lot of students who have had their diploma or associates and not attended a recognized school and were able to further their education. I personally would not, and did not, make the choice based on right now.

    NLN

    CCNE

    Good luck with your decision making process.
  5. by   Murock
    bump just to see if I can get more info
  6. by   graceomalleyRN
    Hi Matt,
    In a nutshell, you will be able to sit for the NCLEX and become an RN going to the school you mention. Some employers, however, will require that your education was completed at a school accredited by either NLN (which accredits Associate's and Bachelor's Programs) or by AACN-CCNE (which accredits all RN's from BSN on up).

    I almost entered a BSN program that was accredited by our state licensing board but not nationally accredited. I chose not to enter that program after speaking to two hospital HR departments and also to the Armed Forces (who also require attendance of a nationally accredited program).

    It may be worthwhile for you to speak to some HR people too, just to get a feel. Ask if they have hired grads from your school and if they foresee any problem continuing to do so. From what I've read on the boards this seems to be more of a problem in large cities where there is more competition for jobs. Good luck to you and let us know what happens.
  7. by   ♪♫ in my ♥
    Unless you have no other choice, don't limit yourself by attending a non-accredited school.

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