New graduates with no clinical skills.

  1. 0
    I am a pre-nursing student and I am currently taking Intro to Nursing. One of my assignments was to interview an RN. One of the questions I had to ask was what advice you would give to students or new graduate nurses. I spoke to a nurse at a local hospital and she said she would tell all students to get out there and get as much clinical experience/skills as possible - to not just sit back, but to get out there and find something that needed to be done and do it to practice the skills and get the experience. She has noticed that new grads do not have the skills they are supposed to have, even on simple things like starting an IV. I thought that was great adivce. She said that it seems like new grads "have no idea what they are doing". I wonder if this is normal accross the board. Could it be that people are going into nursing just for the paycheck and aren't really interested in learning? What is your opinion? Do you agree or disgree? What would be your advice?
  2. 28 Comments so far...

  3. 5
    Quote from kelani01
    I am a pre-nursing student and I am currently taking Intro to Nursing. One of my assignments was to interview an RN. One of the questions I had to ask was what advice you would give to students or new graduate nurses. I spoke to a nurse at a local hospital and she said she would tell all students to get out there and get as much clinical experience/skills as possible - to not just sit back, but to get out there and find something that needed to be done and do it to practice the skills and get the experience. She has noticed that new grads do not have the skills they are supposed to have, even on simple things like starting an IV. I thought that was great adivce. She said that it seems like new grads "have no idea what they are doing". I wonder if this is normal accross the board. Could it be that people are going into nursing just for the paycheck and aren't really interested in learning? What is your opinion? Do you agree or disgree? What would be your advice?
    I don't think it has anything to do with not being interested in learning. Yes, you learn skills in nursing school but you don't get a chance to practice them enough to the point that when you start as a new grad you are completely comfortable doing those skills. I know nurses who never started IVs until they became nurses. They learned how to start IVs on dummies in nursing school, but while you are in clinical the only way the students got to start a real IV was if their patient just happened to need one at that time, and in a lot of cases the chances of your patient just happening to need an IV put in while you are there is slim. They can't let you start an IV on patients just for the learning experience if the patient doesn't need an IV. Same with foleys.

    As a new grad you aren't going to be comfortable with all your skills right away. My advice would be for nursing students to look for nurse interns positions while they are in school. At the hospital I work at many of our nurse interns have said the only chance they've had to really practice a lot of their skills on real people was while working at the hospital.
  4. 0
    Thank you soxgirl2008 for your advice, I honelsty had not thought of the fact that we'll be practicing on dummies. I'm sure it is very different. I will certainly keep your advice in mind.
  5. 1
    Mind you I am a pre nursing student....starting pre reqs in spring actually......anyhow what you said about some people going into nursing for money could be true, but I cant help but wonder (keep in mind this is just from listening to friends of mine experiences) but it seems to be a HUGE trend that clinicals have become an issue of job shopping.......seems there are more times than not when nurses that the students are assigned to during clinicals are to busy to teach or allow the students to have hands on experience because her/his pt load is to heavy......so the student leaves after a whole day of just following the nurse around but has not got to actually do anything......kinda hard to learn skills when you cannot do them......I have heard of these nurses telling the students they like it better when an experienced LPN comes in for clinicals because she can at least help and not sit back and watch......well as a student without this training or someone willing to take the time to give the hands on I'm affraid thats all a student can do.......this seems to also be a trend in sims lab.....instructor says it takes to long to allow each student to practice on the dummy so you explain the steps to the provcedure in the lab instead......wonder if the schools meant for this to be done this way when they set these expensive labs up?

    I am crossing my fingers I can get as much hands on as possible when I start clinicals. You know on the show Grey's Anat.....how all the intern dr's come in droolig for procedures ect lol thats how a nursing student should be while training......we have to pay for this education and they charge us as much as possible so I want to suck as much from them back in return by ensuring that I walk away a capable nurse with a basic knowledge and an attitude that there is room to grow and improve.......whew lol sorry babling now
    vintagemother likes this.
  6. 0
    Exactly!
  7. 5
    Really?? Of COURSE new grads don't have skills... They're new! That's what orientation and the first year is for. You graduate with just enough info to be able to start to learn the specific skill set needed for a first job. Of course new grads arent great at IVs, foleys, doing fundal checks, hanging iv bags etc. Those take practice, the amount of practice which only a job could provide. I don't expect any of the students I precept for leadership to know any of that stuff. I just expect a willingness to be on their feet, talk to patients, practice and learn. That nurse should be ashamed and think back for five seconds on his or her first year on the job and remember how many skills they had to learn after school. Grr...
  8. 2
    Quote from RNmo
    Really?? Of COURSE new grads don't have skills... They're new! That's what orientation and the first year is for. You graduate with just enough info to be able to start to learn the specific skill set needed for a first job. Of course new grads arent great at IVs, foleys, doing fundal checks, hanging iv bags etc. Those take practice, the amount of practice which only a job could provide. I don't expect any of the students I precept for leadership to know any of that stuff. I just expect a willingness to be on their feet, talk to patients, practice and learn. That nurse should be ashamed and think back for five seconds on his or her first year on the job and remember how many skills they had to learn after school. Grr...
    ^THIS...
  9. 3
    Quote from RNmo
    Really?? Of COURSE new grads don't have skills... They're new! That's what orientation and the first year is for. You graduate with just enough info to be able to start to learn the specific skill set needed for a first job. Of course new grads arent great at IVs, foleys, doing fundal checks, hanging iv bags etc. Those take practice, the amount of practice which only a job could provide. I don't expect any of the students I precept for leadership to know any of that stuff. I just expect a willingness to be on their feet, talk to patients, practice and learn. That nurse should be ashamed and think back for five seconds on his or her first year on the job and remember how many skills they had to learn after school. Grr...
    I don't believe in this at all. Orientation should not be where nurses learn their basic skills. Orientation should be where new nurses become oriented to their setting and develop unit specific skills, not basic ones. Yes, it takes time for nurses to develop the skills they need to be competent on the floor, but their first job isn't where they should be acquiring these skills. New grads being ill-prepared for independence on the floor is a large part of why employers don't like hiring new grads. It's not the fault of new grads. These things should be learned in school, not on the job. Clinicals are inadequate as they are. I'm a big proponent of nursing residencies and apprenticeships and only hope that those will be the wave of the future in nursing education.
    angikat, MoshRN, and hope3456 like this.
  10. 8
    Quote from SquishyLVN

    I don't believe in this at all. Orientation should not be where nurses learn their basic skills. Orientation should be where new nurses become oriented to their setting and develop unit specific skills, not basic ones. Yes, it takes time for nurses to develop the skills they need to be competent on the floor, but their first job isn't where they should be acquiring these skills. New grads being ill-prepared for independence on the floor is a large part of why employers don't like hiring new grads. It's not the fault of new grads. These things should be learned in school, not on the job. Clinicals are inadequate as they are. I'm a big proponent of nursing residencies and apprenticeships and only hope that those will be the wave of the future in nursing education.
    As long as this ^^^ is an attitude existing in the healthcare setting, new grads will continue going home crying and burnt out and leave the profession. You can learn the steps for skills in school, like for skill checkoffs, but mastery is in repetition and adequate repetition is available only at a job. That's not debatable.
  11. 2
    In my entire time in nursing school, I was never once at a hospital where I was allowed to start an IV. The hospitals in this area simply don't allow it because of the risks, so I would love to know where the experience is supposed to come from?


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