Need help..don't know if i should continue nursing

  1. 1
    I am doing my pre-reqs for nursing in a ASN program at a county college. I have done research on rn, pa, and cls. I am in school full time with a 4.0 gpa and I work as a certified clinical medical assistant. Therefore, i don't have the time to volunteer and shadow any RNs or PAs. I know first hand how drs can treat their help and how some patients are nasty but i never worked in the hospital before. I love science and medicine but i find myself having a low tolerance for dealing with a**holes at work. Whether its from the drs or patients. I like to help others but i tend to be brutally honest and take no bs. I believe everyone has a job to do and should work together for the best interest of the patient. I believe in doing my job and i take it very seriously. However, I am not an emotinal person and very introverted when it comes to small talk. I don't know if i should continue with becoming an rn or change into becoming a PA or clinical lab. scienctist. I do not like stress (from dealing with bs) and want to come home from work in peace. I want to make good money doing what i love in medicine. I just need to know what it is truly like to be a rn. beyond the so-called explanation of it being a calling or helping people. what is the real deal? is it a fight to keep your lincensure everyday? is it alot of bs? I just don't know what career path to take. I am 27 years old with no children and know i am starting a career late so my dream of becoming a doctor & going to medical school would be out for me. So RN, PA or CLS (i really don't like their low pay though). any advice would be greatly appreciated b/c i am honestly stuck
    WorkingStudent2011 likes this.

    Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights: Student Edition newsletter.

  2. 1
    Many PA schools require you to do shadow hours so you may need to do that if you go that way. Also, most PA schools are full time only while some community college RN programs are part time. You may also have more pre-reqs to be a PA and it may cost more. The PA programs I looked at cost $120k while a community college RN program is much, much cheaper.

    Personally, I want to be a NP. It is a bit longer for me to achieve that than if I wanted to be a PA. Becoming an RN is my first step towards becoming a NP. I really do want to be involved in primary care and a NP would fit into that.

    I will also say that you will always have unpleasant people to deal with. If you don't have an interest in patient care, then I'd tell you to go for CLS.
    sweetpumpernickel likes this.
  3. 1
    If you don't like dealing with bs then don't be a nurse or a PA. People aren't at their best when they are sick/injured or otherwise need medical care, and their families tend to be worked up and stressed as well. Small talk does count when building patient rapport or trying to make the patient more comfortable. It sounds like you would have a hard time faking a good bedside manner. And if you don't like stress, I don't know how in the heck you'd be a nurse or PA. Its stressful but its rewarding if you genuinely care about helping people. It sounds like your interests lie in the scientific side of it.
    sweetpumpernickel likes this.
  4. 0
    yes, i think nursing may not be for me. I don't mind helping people & sometimes like it but i don't feel it would be personally rewarding for me.
  5. 1
    Honestly I think you should re-evaluate your options. Being a nurse will require a lot of dealing with people who are not at their best place in life. This tends to make people cranky and at times difficult and you need to expect that as a nurse. Small talk, patient comfort and trying to make a tough situation better will be part of your job.

    I would definitely recommend that you do some job shadowing before committing to a nursing program to make sure you know what you are in for after a completed program.
    sweetpumpernickel likes this.
  6. 2
    You and I sound like we have the same situation but flip-flopped! I went to school for MLT (luckily went for the associates and not the bachelors) and when I did my clinicals everyone I worked with was very much like you! MLTs (Or CLTs) MTs and cytotechnologists. It was not for me. I got really bad reviews on all my rotations and was basically depressed, worst in my class in my clinicals. Until my phlebotomy rotation. I got the best reviews in my class. Stellar grade! And my supervisor and advisor both sat down with me and told me flat out I needed to switch to nursing. From everything you said (and thats all I have to go on) it sounds to me like you need to switch to lab work! And yes for the degree levels the pay isnt as good but having done both programs I will say this. An associates nursing degree is harder than a bachelors lab degree and the pay is about the same for them. (not saying either is better or worse degree or judging its just a fact nursing degrees are really hard so if you got a lab degree I dont think you would feel unfairly paid in the end) and you can get other graduate degrees or certificates later that would also increase your pay. My SIL works as a MLT and loves her job, if you are suited for it Im sure you wouldnt be sorry. (sorry if this is a bit scrambled Im juggling a couple kids and this reply)
  7. 1
    Quote from HaeleyN
    You and I sound like we have the same situation but flip-flopped! I went to school for MLT (luckily went for the associates and not the bachelors) and when I did my clinicals everyone I worked with was very much like you! MLTs (Or CLTs) MTs and cytotechnologists. It was not for me. I got really bad reviews on all my rotations and was basically depressed, worst in my class in my clinicals. Until my phlebotomy rotation. I got the best reviews in my class. Stellar grade! And my supervisor and advisor both sat down with me and told me flat out I needed to switch to nursing. From everything you said (and thats all I have to go on) it sounds to me like you need to switch to lab work! And yes for the degree levels the pay isnt as good but having done both programs I will say this. An associates nursing degree is harder than a bachelors lab degree and the pay is about the same for them. (not saying either is better or worse degree or judging its just a fact nursing degrees are really hard so if you got a lab degree I dont think you would feel unfairly paid in the end) and you can get other graduate degrees or certificates later that would also increase your pay. My SIL works as a MLT and loves her job, if you are suited for it Im sure you wouldnt be sorry. (sorry if this is a bit scrambled Im juggling a couple kids and this reply)
    Wow, thanks for replying! it is so encouraging to hear this coming form a mLt. it does sound like we are in flip sides. I actually had MT as a back up plan to nursing. Good Luck and i wish you all the best in your nursing career!
    HaeleyN likes this.
  8. 1
    In my opinion, you need to do some soul searching. I know we don’t work for charity, but if you want(ed) to become an MD or a PA not just for the Title or the Pay then you would have worked towards that direction because it’s your passion. Your only 27 and there are individuals in this site who are in their 60’s living their dreams. Make whatever it is that you want to do happen; and not base it on age or anything else.
    WorkingStudent2011 likes this.
  9. 0
    MT is super interesting to study, I just found the work itself very isolating and I did very well working with patients. If you enjoy being able to concentrate on your tasks and also know that what you are doing counts in making peoples health better lab work is a great balance. Good luck and keep me posted on your decision Im very interested to hear about it!


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top