Need Advice

  1. 0
    Hi! I'm new to all nurses, not sure if I'm posting this in the right area. I need some advice about what path to nursing school I should be taking. I am a 24, I have a non-nursing BA, I work part-time in retail and I'm a PRN CNA. I'm going to start LPN school in the fall & it's going to last 3.5 semesters (1 1/2 yrs). I know I'm definitely getting my LPN because I need to start working to pay off student loans. I guess my question is After I get my LPN, should I get a ADN or should I go for a BSN? Thanks for any advice
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  3. 11 Comments so far...

  4. 2
    Since you already have a bachelor degree, I would have skipped the LPN and go directly to a ABSN program which would take 15-18 months. Since you are going the LPN route, the next step would be BSN. Most hospitals are requiring BSN within 5 yrs of hire. Might as well get it over now instead of going back to school a few years after your ADN.
    Nurse2BeInGA and loriangel14 like this.
  5. 0
    My friend had a non-nursing BS degree when she enrolled in an LPN program. Why did she choose the LPN program over an accelerated BSN program? Her grade point average was a 2.5, which was not competitive enough to get admitted into most accelerated BSN programs, and she was not willing to retake courses to boost her GPA.

    To keep a long story short, she worked as an LPN for a few years before completing an RN (ADN) bridge program.
  6. 0
    Hey guys, thanks for your advice. @ Don 1984, I would have love to go for a ABSN, but my GPA isn't going to make the cut. @ The Commuter, it would be cheaper & shorter to do the LPN-ADN route but after getting a ADN, the thing that worries me is actually getting a job & having to go back to get a BSN. I would like to get my BSN through an LPN-BSN program but where I'm at (I'm in South Carolina) there are no LPN-BSN programs, only LPN-ADN. I've even looked at Indiana State Univ. online program, but SC doesn't approved their program. If I go for the BSN, I would have to attend an traditional BSN program in SC. I do have a question for anyone, if I attend an out of state LPN-BSN program, would it be easier to go to a compact state & get a BSN since SC is a compact license state. I've been looking at programs in NC. Anyone know of any LPN-BSN programs for any South Carolinian? Sorry for the long post. Any advice?
  7. 0
    Well does the college you are getting your LPN have a bridge course? If they do I would go there, because most of the time it's like automatic acceptance. I will be starting the ADN program this fall 2013 then I will look into my options later
  8. 0
    Hey! @ MommaTy, my school definitely has a LPN-ADN program & I could easily do that program. It's just me deciding if I'm getting an ADN or BSN & after that I'm done with school.
  9. 0
    do it one step at a time. Get the LPN first, then ADN, then do BSN. Its easier in terms of classes during the semester, and it means you can work full time as an RN while getting your BSN and support yourself.
  10. 0
    Quote from Don1984
    Since you already have a bachelor degree, I would have skipped the LPN and go directly to a ABSN program which would take 15-18 months. Since you are going the LPN route, the next step would be BSN. Most hospitals are requiring BSN within 5 yrs of hire. Might as well get it over now instead of going back to school a few years after your ADN.
    Have you thought about taking A&P I, A&P II, and Microbiology (and any other classes your school requires for the ADN), checking your GPA, and then applying for the ADN? Some schools also have the accelerated non-prior nursing BSN degrees. I would certainly look into something like that before I went all the way back to a LPN if nursing is what you want to invest the rest of your life in.

    I have a BSEd and a MPH, and I am going for a ASN. I want the clinical skills as a RN before pursuing a BSN. That is the reason I did not go for the accelerated program.
  11. 0
    Quote from chas89
    Hey guys, thanks for your advice. @ Don 1984, I would have love to go for a ABSN, but my GPA isn't going to make the cut. @ The Commuter, it would be cheaper & shorter to do the LPN-ADN route but after getting a ADN, the thing that worries me is actually getting a job & having to go back to get a BSN. I would like to get my BSN through an LPN-BSN program but where I'm at (I'm in South Carolina) there are no LPN-BSN programs, only LPN-ADN. I've even looked at Indiana State Univ. online program, but SC doesn't approved their program. If I go for the BSN, I would have to attend an traditional BSN program in SC. I do have a question for anyone, if I attend an out of state LPN-BSN program, would it be easier to go to a compact state & get a BSN since SC is a compact license state. I've been looking at programs in NC. Anyone know of any LPN-BSN programs for any South Carolinian? Sorry for the long post. Any advice?
    Armstrong Atlantic State University in Savannah, GA, has a LPN/LVN to BSN. I don't know anything about the program other than knowing they have one.
    Advanced Track (LPN to BSN) - Nursing Armstrong Atlantic Savannah Georgia
  12. 0
    Quote from chas89
    Hey guys, thanks for your advice. @ Don 1984, I would have love to go for a ABSN, but my GPA isn't going to make the cut. @ The Commuter, it would be cheaper & shorter to do the LPN-ADN route but after getting a ADN, the thing that worries me is actually getting a job & having to go back to get a BSN. I would like to get my BSN through an LPN-BSN program but where I'm at (I'm in South Carolina) there are no LPN-BSN programs, only LPN-ADN. I've even looked at Indiana State Univ. online program, but SC doesn't approved their program. If I go for the BSN, I would have to attend an traditional BSN program in SC. I do have a question for anyone, if I attend an out of state LPN-BSN program, would it be easier to go to a compact state & get a BSN since SC is a compact license state. I've been looking at programs in NC. Anyone know of any LPN-BSN programs for any South Carolinian? Sorry for the long post. Any advice?
    Why not go for the traditional BSN? It won't take you 4 years, since you already have a bachelors. Have you looked into it, to see how long it would take you? If its 2.5 years, then that's only a year more than the LPN, and you'd have your RN at that point. You have to look at the market in your area, will you be employable as an LPN? Also, consider the cost of the LPN program. They are usually not cheap. And if you're going to want/need to go back, that's more $$$.


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