LPN to ARN or right to ARN

  1. All right have made a decision to go into nursing as a career change at 30. Have looked at several options and not sure which direction to go in.

    I would love to get a BS RN in 4 years and have someone else pay all my bills while I attend school. won't happen

    I would like to quit my job and go to school full time for 2 years and get my Associate and become an RN. However I have two children and I need money to live.

    I'm considering going to an LPN program which due to the much lower tuition I may be able to stop working and just go to school for the year.

    After the year I could work in the field in some compacity probably PT and apply my LPN toward an advanced placement Associate RN program immediately.

    Does this make sense I'm hearing diffrent things such as:
    my LPN won't matter due to lack of experience with it.

    A lot of programs don't apply credit from an LPN.

    It will still take me over a year to obtain my associate RN.

    I will still need to take a lot of specific General classes to earn the associatem and it will cost almost as much and take almost as long as the original Associate RN program.

    My question is if I can save a lot of $ and get my LPN can I then transfer right into an Associate RN program and graduate the next year, as a result not having wasted time and money.

    would It still only take two years:
    1 to earn my LPN,
    1 for Associate after I have my LPN

    Any thoughts?
    Please Advise
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   PurrRN
    Alot of your questions depend on your location, and the institutions that you have available at your fingertips. I suggest you research ALL of them so that you have the specific answers that pertain to your situation.

    However, I'll give some example that I've found in my general area of the country. Most LPN schools are 9-12 months. My RN class is 4 semesters (not counting the pre-req's) long. Basically two years.

    Each nursing school is going to have specific to them pre-req's that they may or may not accept from other schools (you have to ask each and every time). Whenever I had a question about whether my school would accept other credits, I'd call just to make sure.

    I transfered from NC to MO and all my pre-req's transfered with me (which was lucky). Some people aren't as lucky as I was in that respect.

    If you decide to go LPN first, I'd suggest knowing what the requirements are for you RN program so that you could be working on those at the same time (to facilitate your tranfer quicker to the RN program).

    Good luck in your quest.
  4. by   catzy5
    Quote from anthony5649
    All right have made a decision to go into nursing as a career change at 30. Have looked at several options and not sure which direction to go in.

    I would love to get a BS RN in 4 years and have someone else pay all my bills while I attend school. won't happen

    I would like to quit my job and go to school full time for 2 years and get my Associate and become an RN. However I have two children and I need money to live.

    I'm considering going to an LPN program which due to the much lower tuition I may be able to stop working and just go to school for the year.

    After the year I could work in the field in some compacity probably PT and apply my LPN toward an advanced placement Associate RN program immediately.

    Does this make sense I'm hearing diffrent things such as:
    my LPN won't matter due to lack of experience with it.

    A lot of programs don't apply credit from an LPN.

    It will still take me over a year to obtain my associate RN.

    I will still need to take a lot of specific General classes to earn the associatem and it will cost almost as much and take almost as long as the original Associate RN program.

    My question is if I can save a lot of $ and get my LPN can I then transfer right into an Associate RN program and graduate the next year, as a result not having wasted time and money.

    would It still only take two years:
    1 to earn my LPN,
    1 for Associate after I have my LPN

    Any thoughts?
    Please Advise

    These are questions I thought about and have worked toward as well. At my CC they offer both LPN and ADN I started off working toward my LPN there were less prereqs and the program is 3 semesters and I could bridge after that and do one more year for my RN. As I started working toward these pre reqs I realized it would be only another year of pre reqs and I could be eligible for my RN so seemed to make more sense to go directly to the degree I wanted. In the long run it saves you money and more importantly your time. LPN is a great job but if you don't have time to work and go to school now you probably won't as a brand new LPN either.

    best wishes.
  5. by   katiem
    I was in the same situation, trying to decided between LPN and RN. Ultimately I decided to focus on my goal, which was to become an RN. None of the LPN credits would apply to an RN, so it was like a year wasted to me. It was very tempting to get done in a year with the LPN because I need a career/money, but in the long run it just wasn't the right decision. I can suffer for an extra year because there are more benefits for me.
    I think it is worth it to go the extra year, there are more job opportunites for an RN and better pay...Hope this helps and goodluck!
  6. by   DesertRain
    Could you possibly look into hospitals in your area that do like an "adopt-a-student" program where if you took your acceptance letter to the hospital for the RN program they would cover your tuition expenses as long as you sign a contract to the hospital. That way you would only be paying for your prereq's for the RN program which might be equivalent to the cost of your LPN studies. Or, do some research and see if hospitals might sponsor your studies as an LPN for and LPN-RN bridge, probably with a contract as well but that could be an option. I know of people who have simply done research on grants and have gotten most of their prereqs paid for by other means (remember you don't have to pay back alot of grants and scholarships) and got their actual RN education paid for by signing hospital contracts. In the end they are making good money and it barely cost them them to get their education. Just some thoughts for you. Good luck and remember where there's a will there's a way.
  7. by   MB37
    What about getting a CNA license, then working as many hours as you can while doing prereqs and going for your ADN immediately? Depending on your state, the LPN credits may or may not transfer over. CNA is usually a pretty short course, and many schools require it before you start an RN program. It pays less than LPN, tho I'm not sure how much...are you a single parent, or do you have a second income to help out?

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