LPN or Paramedic to RN

  1. 0
    Hey everyone!

    I am currently an EMT-B here in Arizona and I'm having trouble deciding on which is a better route to take. I can become a Paramedic in 10 months and take a Paramedic to RN bridge program for my associates OR I can take classes to become an LPN and do the bridge program into Nursing that way. The kicker though, is that I need to be able to provide for myself while in school and most ambulance companies will work around you school schedule if you're obtaining your Paramedic but not an LPN cert. Would it be better to stick with getting my paramedic and working as an EMT-B or should I quit my job and try finding a PCT/CNA job while in LPN school? Hope that makes sense...

    PS. I would go directly into a nursing program but the waiting list here where I am is 2 years and I'm moving in the next year or two...so I planned on doing a bridge program after I have moved to save some time and money.

    Thanks again for all your help!
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  3. 10 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    My only question is, how easy is it to find EMT to RN programs? Will there be a program where you are moving to?
  5. 0
    Well I've talked to many schools and most accept Paramedics into 2nd year RN programs and/or Bridge programs with LPN's. In the Nursing world apparently, a Medic is the same level as an LPN. So both work out to where I'm moving (Atlanta, GA)
  6. 0
    No American RN school accepts Paramedics as second year RN students. Anyone who tells you otherwise is either lying or you need to check thoroughly into their accreditation and reputation because they lack at least one and almost certainly both. The most you will find is 6-9 credits granted, less than half a semester.

    If you actually want to be an RN, what you should do is work as an ER tech and attend a RN program. Don't mess with the bridge drama. New LPN jobs are even harder to come by than than the rare new grad RN job. Working as a tech will be better money than ambulance, probably better than paramedic on an ambulance, and not much less than a LPN. ER tech (or other PCT jobs) will work with your RN school schedule and give you a huge advantage when it comes time to get hired.

    Don't waitlist, find a merit based entry RN program (any BSN program and more and more ADN programs are merit based). Plus, BSN will give you a hirability advantage and future advancement opportunity.
  7. 1
    Quote from SummitAP
    No American RN school accepts Paramedics as second year RN students. Anyone who tells you otherwise is either lying or you need to check thoroughly into their accreditation and reputation because they lack at least one and almost certainly both. The most you will find is 6-9 credits granted, less than half a semester.

    If you actually want to be an RN, what you should do is work as an ER tech and attend a RN program. Don't mess with the bridge drama. New LPN jobs are even harder to come by than than the rare new grad RN job. Working as a tech will be better money than ambulance, probably better than paramedic on an ambulance, and not much less than a LPN. ER tech (or other PCT jobs) will work with your RN school schedule and give you a huge advantage when it comes time to get hired.

    Don't waitlist, find a merit based entry RN program (any BSN program and more and more ADN programs are merit based). Plus, BSN will give you a hirability advantage and future advancement opportunity.
    Your incorrect Darton C.C in Albany Ga does. As maker of fact when I went to take my entrance (HESI A2) exam there were like 20 EMT's taking their test too for the (Healthcare professional to RN program)
    dreher101 likes this.
  8. 0
    Well, I am shocked to see you are correct and the program is even NLN acreddited (for the moment). However there are some major caveats, the biggest being that starting right now, it will take 4 years minimum to complete their RN program.

    1. The old requirement was working at least one year as an LPN or paramedic, the new requirement per the state law that was just passed is a minimum of 2 years full time work experience as an LPN/Paramedic prior to entering the program (experience must be within the last 5 years). There's some further stipulations where you must have worked to have the experience count (acute care). Therefor, the program is slower than going straight to RN school because you must take a 1 year program, work 2 years, then enter the 1 year program. That is 4 years to earning an ADN/RN!!!

    2. It is an accelerated program so there will be little time to work.

    3. Their NCLEX pass rate is 85% (1yr and 5yr avg) which is below the national average (will lead to NLN accredidation loss).
  9. 0
    Quote from SummitAP
    Well, I am shocked to see you are correct and the program is even NLN acreddited (for the moment). However there are some major caveats, the biggest being that starting right now, it will take 4 years minimum to complete their RN program.

    1. The old requirement was working at least one year as an LPN or paramedic, the new requirement per the state law that was just passed is a minimum of 2 years full time work experience as an LPN/Paramedic prior to entering the program (experience must be within the last 5 years). There's some further stipulations where you must have worked to have the experience count (acute care). Therefor, the program is slower than going straight to RN school because you must take a 1 year program, work 2 years, then enter the 1 year program. That is 4 years to earning an ADN/RN!!!

    2. It is an accelerated program so there will be little time to work.

    3. Their NCLEX pass rate is 85% (1yr and 5yr avg) which is below the national average (will lead to NLN accredidation loss).
    Wow.. "Im shocked" and "for the moment".....who are you????? This is a place for support and encouragement. I think that is what the orginal poster wants....not negativty

    And I'm sure if she or he choose to do this program, they would be in that 85% that would pass there NCLEX.

    To the orginal poster, I wish you the best with whatever choice you make and I'm sure you'll be just fine with passing you NCLEX.
    Last edit by keepmovingrn on Jul 24, '11
  10. 0
    Quote from keepmovinglpn
    Wow.. "Im shocked" and "for the moment".....who are you????? This is a place for support and encouragement. I think that is what the orginal poster wants....not negativty

    And I'm sure if she or he choose to do this program, they would be in that 85% that would pass there NCLEX
    I'm shocked because most paramedic to RN bridge programs that are legit only give credit for a few classes resulting in little or no time savings. Those that have offered any significant time savings have been sketchy, for profit, unaccredited programs that haven't stuck around for very long.

    So I AM shocked to see one that is an accredited, non-profit. They must have been doing something right, although the new GA legislation mandating more experience for applicants of such programs appears aimed directly at this program. I have no idea what Georgia politics are behind it.

    As to the test scores, I am not judging the OP, but I am talking about the program's outcomes. I am saying it is below the national average because being above the national average is what is required to gain and keep NLN accredidation.

    None of this is a judgement against the OP, just observations about the history of these sorts of programs. I have researched this a fair amount because I once considered the same path as the OP, but found it to be more trouble than it is worth so I skipped it and went the BSN route. I'm merely trying to save the OP some trouble so their eagerness is not rewarded with disappointment, so feel free to untwist your panties.
    Last edit by SummitRN on Jul 24, '11
  11. 0
    You are INCORRECT..our community college runs a VERY successful medic to rn program where the medics join the 2nd year RN's. It is only a year long program. It is only offered at 3 of the campuses statewide right now but is is very successful with high grad rates! If you ever move to Indiana, check out Ivy Tech Community College. I am getting ready to start their Medic/RN program which is where I obtained my Paramedic Science degree.
  12. 0
    and there is no min. time you have to have had to be a paramedic and of course you have to complete some more co-reqs and pre-reqs than you did for paramedic. but not many.. I have friends already practicing as RN's that came out of the same program and of course it is accredited.


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