LPN OR BSN

  1. Im a 18 year old who graduated from high school with a CNA. I was supposed to take liberal arts in a community college so I can go and get my BSN. But something happen with my fasfa so Im not going to college until the spring semester. All this time I been working as an CNA. I was wondering if I can go and get my LPN.Their is a prep course for the placement test in January. But Im going back to school around in January. I really need some advice if its worth me going back to BOCES and get my LPN and then go to an LPN To BSN School or go straight to liberal arts and then go get my BSN.
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   Rose_Queen
    It all depends on your goal. If your ultimate goal is RN and you can afford to wait- it's only one semester. Most likely the LPN program would be longer than a single semester, so you'd actually be delaying yourself even more.
  4. by   Zelda30
    My goal is to be an RN.But if I take the liberal arts it will take me two years. So I really dont know
  5. by   KelRN215
    Quote from Zelda30
    My goal is to be an RN.But if I take the liberal arts it will take me two years. So I really dont know
    Is there a reason you are going the liberal arts route first? You can enter a BSN program directly out of high school. That's what I did.
  6. by   Zelda30
    The reason why I did liberal arts first is because majority of school in NY want to have their liberal arts first. And I was thinking if I become a LPN I can go to a bridge program. But I really dont know if this is a smart move
  7. by   KelRN215
    Quote from Zelda30
    The reason why I did liberal arts first is because majority of school in NY want to have their liberal arts first. And I was thinking if I become a LPN I can go to a bridge program. But I really dont know if this is a smart move
    Have you looked into traditional 4 year BSN programs? This is normal undergrad college. You don't need any college courses before enrolling. The program covers all liberal arts classes that you need, all pre-reqs and all nursing classes. There's no question that this is your best option if you are a recent high school grad, IMO. There are many of these programs in NY. The route you're thinking of taking is going to take you much longer.
  8. by   KiwiKatt
    I don't recommend becoming an LPN. It sets you back time wise and a lot of these classes will need to be retaken basically. You'll have to do all your clinicals all over again. If RN is your goal, you shoild get the pre-rews done and then transfer or just go strsight into a university to get your BSN. You don't need a degree prior to starting your BSN program.
  9. by   Zelda30
    Let's just say if I do the LPN program and go to a LPN TO BSN Program. Will that work?
  10. by   Rose_Queen
    Quote from Zelda30
    Let's just say if I do the LPN program and go to a LPN TO BSN Program. Will that work?
    It is one of several pathways. Only you can decide if that will work for you.
  11. by   BSNbeDONE
    Quote from Zelda30
    Let's just say if I do the LPN program and go to a LPN TO BSN Program. Will that work?
    Seems to me that you are set on becoming an LPN regardless of the advice you receive here. If you want a liberal arts degree, get it. If you want to become an LPN, do so. If you want to become an RN, become an RN. The bottom line is that if your goal is to become an RN with a BSN, you will be wasting a lot of time (and money) if you choose to pursue anything else first.

    The only thing required prior to beginning your studies towards the BSN is a completed application on file with the school and an acceptance letter from that school...period.

    A liberal arts degree won't score you any brownie points in nursing school. In fact, the nursing program will probably extract only those credits from that degree that would satisfy specific prereqs, and toss the rest.

    If you have the option, which it appears that you do, I would suggest the direct-entry BSN program. If it's a matter of needing income as soon as possible, then yes, get the LPN. But understand that there are some programs that allow RN students to sit for the LPN NCLEX at a certain point in the ASN and/or BSN program. So, I still wouldn't waste any time pursuing an independent practical nursing program if I indeed had other options.
  12. by   KelRN215
    Quote from Zelda30
    Let's just say if I do the LPN program and go to a LPN TO BSN Program. Will that work?
    You seem stuck on becoming an LPN for some reason. If that's what you want to do, do it but becoming an LPN is an unnecessary stop on the road to a BSN. The route you are talking about taking is going to take much longer than if you just entered a traditional 4 year BSN program.

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