How many hours do you study per day? - page 2

Or, what's the most you've done? I study 3 hours a day for my Health Science class (A&P & Micro), and at least 30 minutes for Chemistry. Last week I had a Chemistry test, so I studied extra,... Read More

  1. by   Multicollinearity
    Quote from Sapper41
    I have never hard studied 4-5 hours like it seems alot of other people do.


    Sapper, I'm curious. For a class like A&P, are you saying you never studied for several hours at a time?
  2. by   Multicollinearity
    Quote from EJM
    For those who don't have to read your book and still get an A I have a question out of curiosity. What if your tests had questions that weren't in your notes, but out of the book? Not reading your book I think could be dangerous as there are many important concepts and important things you may need to know later on. It isn't all about the grade.
    Good point to bring up. I've heard from a few students that they don't read the textbook. This boggles my mind. I read through all of the case studies, and I feel like reading the textbook takes my knowledge level from rote memorization - to critical thinking at a professional level. It's probably safe to say taht I 'suck the marrow' from my course work.
  3. by   Multicollinearity
    Also, for the students who say they never read their textbook - that they only study their notes - I have a question. Many of my classes have exam questions from our reading assignments, that we never cover in lecture. Do you just miss all those questions? I am curious. Do some schools just not test on material not covered in lecture?
  4. by   Ekklesia
    Quote from EJM
    For those who don't have to read your book and still get an A I have a question out of curiosity. What if your tests had questions that weren't in your notes, but out of the book? Not reading your book I think could be dangerous as there are many important concepts and important things you may need to know later on. It isn't all about the grade.
    Our A&P tests were always straight off of the notes, so we never had to read. However, the prof followed the chapters in the book and we could always reference it for more detailed info if we had to (which I did--a bunch).

    This history course I'm taking is straight out of the book and class notes seem to be worthless so far (and a waste of time), so I have to read the book and try and second guess what might be on the test.

    My statistics prof mostly uses notes, and lets us use our books for tests!
  5. by   blueyesue
    Quote from multicollinarity
    Also, for the students who say they never read their textbook - that they only study their notes - I have a question. Many of my classes have exam questions from our reading assignments, that we never cover in lecture. Do you just miss all those questions? I am curious. Do some schools just not test on material not covered in lecture?
    Good questions. Textbooks are one the most valuable resources we have. In it contains all the information we should know as we become nurses. I would prefer a nurse who has studied his/her books and recieved a C than someone who only looked at their notes and got an A. I apologize if this offends anyone. I think it is so important to know what is in between the covers of your textbooks. Why are they written then. Plus that's a lot of money to waste just to look at the cover.
    Last edit by blueyesue on Feb 10, '07
  6. by   catzy5
    Quote from TexasAngel
    I must admit, I spend about 2-3 hours a day at least. Microbiology requires a bit more than most of the others I must admit, but I must say, I am happiest when I am studying.
    It makes my leisure time a real treat. Today, I only put in about an hour, and that was after I swore I wouldnt pick up a book.
    I love school.


    hehehehehe you sound just like me! I swear not much time goes by that I am not planning, studying or just making use of my time in a studious manner. It pays off thought I worked my tail off we had our first exam today in AP 2 average grade was 62 I got a 90. I was actually a bit bummed it wasn't a higher A but I guess when everyone around me was doing so bad I should be happy, I know where my mistakes were and I can chage them this next time around. First exams are always the hardest getting the feel etc...
  7. by   catzy5
    Quote from multicollinarity
    Good point to bring up. I've heard from a few students that they don't read the textbook. This boggles my mind. I read through all of the case studies, and I feel like reading the textbook takes my knowledge level from rote memorization - to critical thinking at a professional level. It's probably safe to say taht I 'suck the marrow' from my course work.


    I read the book for both my classes I basicly try to teach myself the lesson before even going to class. This way when lecture happens I can pay attention taking notes on points I missed or didn't get. I also use the websites with my books, I take practice tests and watch video animations. especially for AP2 and micro there are alot of things I don't "get" the first time around I sometimes need to read re read and then read again.

    works for me
  8. by   blueyesue
    Quote from catzy5
    I read the book for both my classes I basicly try to teach myself the lesson before even going to class. This way when lecture happens I can pay attention taking notes on points I missed or didn't get. I also use the websites with my books, I take practice tests and watch video animations. especially for AP2 and micro there are alot of things I don't "get" the first time around I sometimes need to read re read and then read again.

    works for me
    That's exactly what I do. I utilize websites, animations, read ahead etc. I guess that's the way it gets burned into my brain. I am a visual learner, and I need to be able to "picture" it.
  9. by   krenee
    [QUOTE][I study about 1hr some days of the week, other days I don't even study at all. 2 days before an exam I will read my notes 2-3 times before I go to bed, The day before I read them 1-2 times outloud before I go to be, then the day before I might just skim the notes. I have never hard studied 4-5 hours like it seems alot of other people do. /QUOTE]

    Wow - so say anatomy - you have to learn all the bones, along with the names of all the bumps, crevices, and holes (LOL, not the technical names, I know!) - do you have a photographic memory or something? Or say, all the muscles with their insertions, origins, and actions? I just don't see how anyone can learn this easily . . . I have to go over, and over, and over it, and still I won't remember them all. I'm doing very well in school, but it ain't coming easy for me!

    Kelly
  10. by   nurseangel47
    I sooo sympathize, empathize and otherwise feel ya'lls pain! I remember not being a good student at all in high school...just wanting to party my life and the teenage blues away! Then, all of a sudden fast forward to a quickie marriage with pending bun in the oven while walking down aisle at young age of 20 ..... all of a sudden I'm serious about my future, my baby's future, my life, etc. I went to nursing school with two little ones to care for and it seemed as though I studied literally every waking moment. I probably overstudied but didn't know how to study so tried to absorb everything! I wish now I could go back and relish the time I did not spend with my little ones. I'd wait and go to college when they entered kindergarten. Oh well...can't go back in time. My point? Try to find someone to teach you to properly study to save time and energy. I burned my candle at both ends for three long years to gain an ADN that takes most people only two years to complete. I frequently ponder how my and my kids' lives would've been different and better if I hadn't had my nose in the books for so long!
    I took a course at the community college I attended in how to plan and use my time wisely and it helped some. BUt I recall highlighting so much and trying to read so many of the required text that I'd literally study all night and fall asleep with the reams of reading material in bed every night.
    Good luck in your studies, dear nursing students. We need you so badly in the trenches. Try not to wear yourselves out with studying and being perfect. I was an average student. I like to consider myself an above average nurse. Your gpa means little when it comes time to care for folks.
  11. by   Multicollinearity
    Quote from nurseangel47
    My point? Try to find someone to teach you to properly study to save time and energy. I burned my candle at both ends for three long years to gain an ADN that takes most people only two years to complete.

    Try not to wear yourselves out with studying and being perfect. I was an average student. I like to consider myself an above average nurse. Your gpa means little when it comes time to care for folks.
    Nurseangel,

    I don't know of any ADN programs that can be done in two years anymore. All of the ADN programs in my part of the country require at least one full year of pre-reqs before one can begin the two year nursing program.

    I also agree that GPA means little to patients - but that's not why most of us are working so hard for our GPA's. Besides wanting to be good students and learn the material, competition for admission to nursing programs is fierce. Only 1 out of 6 applicants are accepted to the programs I am applying to. There are 6 applicants for every seat. So because of this, you better believe I'm trying to maintain that perfect GPA.
  12. by   Annaiya
    Quote from multicollinarity
    Also, for the students who say they never read their textbook - that they only study their notes - I have a question. Many of my classes have exam questions from our reading assignments, that we never cover in lecture. Do you just miss all those questions? I am curious. Do some schools just not test on material not covered in lecture?
    For my A&P class the information in the book was different from what he had in his lectures, and I got really confused when I tried to read the book. (It used different terms and didn't cover the same material.) He only tested on what was in the lecture, so after the first couple of weeks I never opened my book again. His lectures were really thorough, so I don't feel like I missed anything. (There would usually be around 450 powerpoint slides for one week worth of content.)

    Otherwise, I think it is valuable to know what parts in the text are beneficial to read. Someone mentioned case studies and I agree often the case studies bring the content together so you can check that you understand everything. Often text books throw in extra stuff that either isn't necessary or isn't important. Knowing what to read and what to study is really helpful. You aren't going to remember everything from the class 2 years after taking it, so focus on really learning the important parts.
  13. by   Annaiya
    Quote from EJM
    Good questions. Textbooks are one the most valuable resources we have. In it contains all the information we should know as we become nurses. I would prefer a nurse who has studied his/her books and recieved a C than someone who only looked at their notes and got an A. I apologize if this offends anyone. I think it is so important to know what is in between the covers of your textbooks. Why are they written then. Plus that's a lot of money to waste just to look at the cover.
    Reading the text book doesn't mean you understand the information. It isn't possible to get an A withouth learning anything. You can however, get a C by just having lucky guesses on the exam. I really don't think there is any bright line rule for how to learn the content in a course. It depends on how the course is taught, the quality of the text book (and I've had some very poorly written text books), and how the student learns. It is interesting to hear how other people study and how long they spend, but if you're getting good grades with your study methods don't feel like you have to change.

    My best study tip (which I've seen on here before) is make flash cards when you have to memeorize a lot of informaiton. (Question on front of card, answer on back.) Take them with you where ever you go during the day and flip through them once in a while. It is amazing how quickly you will remember everything on the cards.

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