How long for Rn program with prerequisites included?

  1. 0 I am debating on whether to go for my Rn or LVN but someone told me that it actually takes you more like 3 years to get thru everything. If anyone has any advice, it will be greatly appreciated.:spin:
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  3. Visit  jlhalloween profile page

    About jlhalloween

    Joined Oct '05; Posts: 44.

    11 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  ibmaryann profile page
    0
    It will take me 3 years to get my RN degree. For my school you must have Anatomy and Physiology 1 (1 semester) , Anatomy and Physiology 2 (1 semester) and at least Intermediate Algebra. You can't take A and P 1 and 2 at the same time so it would at least take 2 semesters to finish those and you would need to apply for the next years program. The actual nursing program takes 2 years making it 3 years. I do know of people of took a and p 1 the spring semester and applied for RN and then completed A and P 2 in the summer before they started in the Fall.
    God Bless,
    Mary Ann
  5. Visit  arciedee profile page
    0
    It depends on the program. At the community colleges in my state it is technically a 2-year program, co-reqs included. The reality is that admission is competitive and thus most applicants are completing some or all of the non-clinical courses beforehand to give them a better shot at getting in (though nowhere is this stated as a requirement). The other factor to consider is the amount of time that clinicals will take up. Many people find it easier to have everything out of the way prior to clinicals so that is all they have to focus on once they get to that point. Though there are plenty who have managed to balance clinicals and non-nursing courses simultaneously and have done just fine.

    Check the programs in your area to find out how long typical students take to complete their degree. Good luck to you.
  6. Visit  DaughterofRuth profile page
    0
    At my local community college, on average it takes students 3-4 years to complete the ADN (2 year degree). All prerequisites must be completed prior to admission to the nursing program, and the nursing classes and clinicals take 2 years.
  7. Visit  JaxiaKiley profile page
    0
    It takes a minimum of 3 years around here because you have to have the pre-reqs before you can apply. But, the program is about 75 hours including the pre-reqs.
  8. Visit  jlhalloween profile page
    0
    Thanks for all the good advice:spin:
  9. Visit  JoshuaC profile page
    0
    BSN programs usually run 8 full time semesters (that's 4 years). 1 year for pre-reqs and then 3 years in the nursing school.

    ADN programs usually run 5-6 full time semesters. The ADN program I'm in only required 1 semester of pre-reqs, or, for the pre-reqs they required you could get them in 1 semester, and the program last 2 years. HOWEVER, that's sufice to say you can get all of your required credits in 5 semesters; it might take longer. I'm going into an ADN program with 2 years of college under my belt, so I could go part time from here on out and get by.

    If you go for an RN-BSN, which is the way in which you achieve a BSN degree after you've already become licenced as an RN (majority here are ADN). That varies. For my RN-BSN I'll have to go to school another year and then take a couple summer classes.

    There is tons of diversity among nursing schools, so just research.
  10. Visit  tookewlandy profile page
    0
    At my school you have 2 ways to get in, you can either take a minimum of 12 "allied heath" courses and get in by your GPA. or you can get in by taking NLN exam( thats how i got in). They chose 100 people, i think 70 GPA, 15 LPN transitioning, and 15 NLN scores.

    If you do not take the allied health courses to get in you still have to take them with the Nursing courses if you get in anyway other than GPA of those courses(A&PI & II, Human Growth,Comp,comp2,biochem,micro,psych,soci)

    I have found that alot of schools around the Pittsburgh area are like this, so it makes it pretty easy to get in and not have to wait around here if you get a good enough GPA, or get a high Entrance exam score

    I took the NLN in January and started some pre req, and then took more in Summer that i am finishing now so it will only take me 2.5 years to graduate according to plan. GOOD LUCK ALL


    Andy
  11. Visit  Reno1978 profile page
    0
    I started taking classes in June of 2004 and I ought to graduate in December of 2007 with a BSN...so a bit over 3.5 years once all is said and done. I did take some summer classes, so that shortened the journey quite a bit. Until this past fall, I worked full time and did not take a full load of classes each semester.
  12. Visit  allthingsbright profile page
    0
    Well, this isnt a popoular answer, but the truth is it will probably take you 4-5 years due to the competitive nature of things out there. Thats one year of pre & co reqs or more (you cant get in most places without having it all done), a one to two year wait, and two years of actual nursing classes.

    It will have taken me 5 years for my two year degree.
  13. Visit  hospitalstaph profile page
    0
    By the time I am done it will have taken me 3 1/2 years to get my ADN. The ADN program that I am in is accelerated, so the actual nursing course/clinical portion is 18 months, but I have also finished all pre and co-reqs so I am only taking 8-9 credits a quarter.

    T
  14. Visit  Reno1978 profile page
    0
    Quote from allthingsbright
    Well, this isnt a popoular answer, but the truth is it will probably take you 4-5 years due to the competitive nature of things out there. Thats one year of pre & co reqs or more (you cant get in most places without having it all done), a one to two year wait, and two years of actual nursing classes.

    It will have taken me 5 years for my two year degree.
    I think that really depends on the area. The place I'm going admits 48 students every fall and spring based on GPA and I believe the low end of the GPA scale for the past few semesters has been between 3.2 to 3.5. So basically, as long as you do well in your prereq classes, it isn't so tough to get accepted. I was accepted my first try, no waiting and only applied to one of three schools in my area that have nursing programs. I haven't met anyone around here that has had to wait years to be accepted to a program, but I may not be talking to the right people.


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