How long does it take to complete a pre-nursing program?

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    Hey People! I just got admitted into a pre-nursing program and was told I needed to do some pre-requisites courses for me to be considered a nursing student. How hectic are the courses? I was told the program is for 2 years, Is it possible for me to use less than that to complete it. I feel really scared and discouraged.
  2. 11 Comments so far...

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    It depends on the program, they might have you on a schedule in which you enter as an official nursing student. You could take more classes per quarter and take classes over the summer to speed up the time.

    In general, a BS degree takes 4 years to complete. If you are going for a BSN, 2 of those years are generally nursing and 2 of those years are other requirements such as general ed and pre-reqs.

    It'd probably be best to talk to a counselor about taking more classes and taking classes over the summer to speed up your time.
    mplovex likes this.
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    Thank you! It's a 2 yr college, but I was told I needed to complete another 2 yr pre-req before admission into the nursing prog.
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    Quote from EstherAyo
    Hey People! I just got admitted into a pre-nursing program and was told I needed to do some pre-requisites courses for me to be considered a nursing student. How hectic are the courses? I was told the program is for 2 years, Is it possible for me to use less than that to complete it. I feel really scared and discouraged.
    I think two years is the average. Why is that scary and discouraging? You have a lot to learn! It won't be done quickly!
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    @stephalump I am thinking of transferring to Wesleyan College after the two yrs pre-reqs but I don't know if I will be able to fit in and how many years more it will take me to complete the nursing program.
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    The college I go to requires about 26 credits of general education and nursing pre-reqs. So, going full time you could finish it in an academic year and maybe a summer. The nursing program is five semesters long. (This is an ADN program) So that is adding up to about 4 years all together, not counting any wait to get a seat. If you have any pre-reqs to the pre-reqs (as in needing to take remedial math or English courses) that would, of course, add on to the time. Most of the 26 credits must be done with a certain grade before entering the nursing program. There are a couple of classes you can take once in the program, but I think a lot of people like to get them out of the way so they can concentrate only on their clinicals and nursing courses.

    I don't know what your school requires, but if you are doing a pre-nursing program, full time, maybe you can finish in less than 2 years, but some classes are sequential, such as A&P I and II, so there is only so fast you can go.
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    You can do it in 1-1.5 years if you take classes in the summer and winter sessions in addition to fall and spring. I could have easily done it in 1 year at my community college.
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    I work at a community college. Start to finish to earn and Associates in Nursing it usually takes 3-4 years going full-time.
    kgregg likes this.
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    DONT be discouraged...at community colleges they require you do pre-reqs... takes a lil longer but Ive been told its not so badd! Im older Im older (43) I wont g that route only because TIME is of the essence... will probably end up going to a Specialize school... where most LPN programs are done full time in about 14 mos...
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    I go to a community college/tech school. I started pre-reqs Fall 2011 (with 12 credit hours). I went Spring 2012 (7 credit hours), will go Summer 2012 (7 credit hours), and will finish my pre-reqs Fall 2012 (7 credit hours). I'll apply and take my entrance exam January-ish 2013, and hopefully start the program Fall 2013 for two years.

    I could have finished my pre-reqs more quickly, but I was told to take my sciences by themselves, if possible. So...spring, summer and fall each have a science and one other class (so I'm a part-time student instead of full-time) -- A&P I, then A&P II, and finally Microbiology.

    I know of people who took A&P I (and its lab) with a full-time schedule. Personally, I'm older and very glad I scaled back. A&P I required a lot of studying on my part. It wasn't hectic, it wasn't difficult, it was just a lot.

    BTW -- It may seem a little scary at first, but once you're into it, it'll be just another thing. That first step is always the hardest one.

    HTH!


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