How is BSN training different than ASN?

  1. [font=Comic Sans MS]It looks as though I will not be able to do the ASN due to a financial aid situation (too many credits), so I've decided to apply for the BSN in the State University System. Can anyone tell me how the training is different? One of the things I noticed on the curriculum was that instead of having a Nursing process class worth 8 credits and covers just about everything within the first semester, the BSN has four different classes...pathophysiology, pharmacology, fundamentals, physical exam and assessment, etc.
    [font=Comic Sans MS]
    [font=Comic Sans MS]Thanks in advance,
    [font=Comic Sans MS]Kris
    •  
  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   Tweety
    I think it's more in depth and covers areas such as assessment, public health, transcultural nursing, leadership and research in a lot more detail. I'm sure someone can answer it better, just want to wish you luck.

    I know in my ADN program it was a lot of mulitple choice tests like NCLEX, and the BSN program I'm in now is nothing but papers.
    Good luck to you.
    Last edit by Tweety on Jan 28, '05
  4. by   mom2michael
    Quote from mccnrs2b
    [font=Comic Sans MS]It looks as though I will not be able to do the ASN due to a financial aid situation (too many credits), so I've decided to apply for the BSN in the State University System. Can anyone tell me how the training is different? One of the things I noticed on the curriculum was that instead of having a Nursing process class worth 8 credits and covers just about everything within the first semester, the BSN has four different classes...pathophysiology, pharmacology, fundamentals, physical exam and assessment, etc.
    [font=Comic Sans MS]
    [font=Comic Sans MS]Thanks in advance,
    [font=Comic Sans MS]Kris
    The biggest difference I've noticed from the ADN program vs. the BSN program here.....the BSN program has more required classes that present the material to the student where the ADN program (due to how many hours they can actually require) crams all those class into ADN classes (if that makes any sense).

    We take a class called Interventions (you take a different level each semester) and you are basically taught patho, pharm, fund and assessment in those classes all at one time instead of having seperate classes for each.

    The other big thing is that we do not have a seperate pharm class....part of it is self taught (dosage) and the rest in taught w/in your Intervention and other classes.

    The actual amount of clinical hours are the same for both programs here BUT, you do more community health in the BSN program than you do in the ADN program.
  5. by   twarlik
    I agree with what everyone else has said. Although, in my BSN program we have plenty of multiple choice tests AND papers. Perhaps the program Tweety is referring to is an RN to BSN bridge program.
    In general my impression has been that BSN students usually write more papers and spend more time in public and community health. We also got to do a critical care rotation while the local ADN program does not do that. Every program is different, so I would definitely check with the specific programs and see how they differ.

    Good luck!
  6. by   SBUalum03
    Quote from mccnrs2b
    [font=Comic Sans MS]It looks as though I will not be able to do the ASN due to a financial aid situation (too many credits), so I've decided to apply for the BSN in the State University System. Can anyone tell me how the training is different? One of the things I noticed on the curriculum was that instead of having a Nursing process class worth 8 credits and covers just about everything within the first semester, the BSN has four different classes...pathophysiology, pharmacology, fundamentals, physical exam and assessment, etc.

    [font=Comic Sans MS]Thanks in advance,
    [font=Comic Sans MS]Kris
    I also thinks it depends on what state you plan on getting your degree in. I can only speak on the programs in NYC.
  7. by   UTRN2005
    One of the biggest differences is that a BSN program will include community and public health while most, if not all, ADNs do not have these. BSN will also have management classes. Clinical hours have a minimum set by the state so most programs have fairly equivalent clinical hours now. I think the main question is whether you want to go into public health, management, or continue to a master's, then a BSN will be helpful if not required. YOu can always do a RN to BSN program but since you're still looking at schools if you're interested in one of these areas you may want to go ahead and get the BSN.
  8. by   momofstudent
    Most of these responses are incorrect. I did both so I know. The BSN has a research component because they are also preparing each student for potential graduate study. Associate degrees do not prepare for public and community health. The BSN requires far more classes not related to nursing but they prepare a well rounded graduate by requiring courses in Literature, music, history, philosophy etc.
  9. by   baglady215
    I'm curious what do you mean when you say you have too many credits?

    EDIT: Sorry, I just realized this post is 3 years old.
  10. by   CorazonDeOro
    Quote from baglady215
    I'm curious what do you mean when you say you have too many credits?

    EDIT: Sorry, I just realized this post is 3 years old.
    A lot of community colleges will not give you financial aid if you exceed a certain number of credits without getting a degree at that particular school, which for those of us who have BAs in other field but choose to go the ADN route, is really awful. You have to appeal to the school with a satisfactory progress form (at my school anyway), basically saying that you have a plan and are not just taking a bunch of classes for no reason. Its all very frustrating for those of us who just need a small loan to help with nursing school! gr!!
  11. by   RochesterRN-BSN
    I can only speak to the two places I have been at--I started an ASN at a community college and did half the program-- transferred for a BS in another area as I idn't like it at all-- and after getting that BS in 98 I went back and got a BSN at a university --an accelerated BSN-- I really didn't do well in the ASN program and graduated with honors in the BSN program......what was different? For me there seemed to more of a focus on understanding the WHY in the BSN program and in memorizing in the ASN program-- ie.... a patient has XYZ disease-- in the ASN we memorized a list of what symptoms the patient would have with that disease, the treatment, and patient teaching with it. In the BSN it was more...the patient has disease XYZ...so based on knowing the pathophysiology of that disease, what organs and sytems it effects think about how that would manifest into symptoms...and so on........this is one big thing i noticed and for me and the way I learn that was better for me to learn based on the understanding of the disease process. I never even had pathophysiology in the ASN program--at least in that first of the two years and had to do med/surg clinicals without that knowledge..........maybe it's different there as that was a long time ago and I can't speak to other schools.........
    You can call the local schools and get info on both programs, what classes they take for each and so forth...what clinicals they get to do....etc.
    Hope this helps......good luck.

close