How do you become a volunteer?

  1. 0
    I've been crawling around all the different boards and I can't really find anything specific to this, kind of a basic question but what are the exact steps to, and what are the general daily activities of someone who's a student volunteer at a hospital or other specialized facility?
  2. 8 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    It may depend on the facility. It is best to contact the volunteer services department. I know from a hospital where I had to train a breastfeeding peer counselor that we had to follow a volunteer training, had background checks done, health screening and immunizations and tb skin test done. I am not familiar with the type of work, since we we there with a different purpose than the regular volunteers.
  4. 0
    I went on hospital websites and filled out applications. I was under the impression that they were full, but I have orientation on Saturday.
  5. 0
    Thanks for the advice so far, I actually have an opportunity that I need insight how to proceed, I have this on a general topic thread but will elaborate here...

    I'm looking to start volunteering to get some basic experience and to help with my admission consideration to a program.

    My friend just started working at a skilled nursing and rehab unit as a nutritionist and has started a conversation with the head nurse at the facility on my behalf to try and see if I might be able to work as a volunteer.

    She (head nurse) asked him (friend) what kind of jobs or the direction I'd take if I was to go there and what would be my agenda... I explain I'm still pre-nursing school working on my prerequisites to get into BSN program and that this volunteer experience will help with my admission, but also that I would obviously like to create a possible working relationship for the future.

    She wants to know what duties I would do day-to-day as a volunteer, but also is intrigued as to what specialties I might go into after I graduate. Because I have essentially zero experience with any working nurse situation I'm not exactly sure what specialties I would be getting into for sure (i have ideas but would expect those to evolve the further i get in my education and subsequent furure working experiences) and know only for sure that I need experience volunteering.

    My question is, the head nurse wants to know exactly what I need to do/would be doing in my daily volunteering activities at their office and I'm not quite sure what to tell her, so far I've just said anything nursing or health related. What should I say to this question?

    This is a really good opportunity for volunteer experience but also for making a connection at a great facility to possibly work at after I graduate. Any advice as to the specifics of what I should say would be greatly appreciated!
  6. 0
    SNFs are hard to volunteer at with any activity other than paperwork. You could say you would like to help with the workflow as best as you can, such as alleviating time from nurses/unit coordinator's duties in faxing, copying, and so forth. Possibly delivering meals, and helping with activities too. But stress that if possible, you would also like a job shadowing experience, where you can observe nurses over time to see duties that are approved and ask questions about the profession. The SNF I used to work at traded clerical work for job shadowing for students.
  7. 0
    Don't worry, it's easy! I volunteer at a children's hospital. First, there was a application online. Then, I went and interviewed (which was cheesy easy!,) got a TB skin test, and a background check. I only have to volunteer once a week for about three hours at a time. Once I have the amount of hours needed to put on my resume, I will simply ask for proof on a letterhead from the person in charge of volunteer services.
  8. 0
    I volunteered at a hospital while I was in school. Contact the facility volunteer dept and ask questions. If you do volunteer I suggest choosing a job that will expose you to as many nurses/ managers as possible. I volunteered as a transporter, moving patients all around the hospital. This exposed me to what went on in all the floors and departments. I got to know many nurses, and a couple of nurse managers which ultimately lead to a job offer when I graduated. As far as I know, the first graduates from my class that got work ALL had a previous relationship with the facilities that hired them. In this economy, you need to have that because grades and a nice resume just don't cut it anymore in my opinion.
  9. 0
    Quote from margerator
    Don't worry, it's easy! I volunteer at a children's hospital. First, there was a application online. Then, I went and interviewed (which was cheesy easy!,) got a TB skin test, and a background check. I only have to volunteer once a week for about three hours at a time. Once I have the amount of hours needed to put on my resume, I will simply ask for proof on a letterhead from the person in charge of volunteer services.
    I second this. It's easy, but I will add that it took almost a year to get a spot at the children's hospital I volunteer at. Submit an application then continue to follow up every few weeks. It's not like they're going to get upset that you're hell bent on volunteering there.

    I also had to have two letters of recommendation from teachers or bosses. There was a 3 hour orientation, then a large open book test about the hospital and their policy's.

    Google the name of the hospital and volunteer office. Call them, and the wheels will be in motion.
  10. 0
    I have an appointment to speak with the volunteer coordinator on Monday... I'll do a tb test and they said I'll definitely be able to help with activities.


Top