How do RN school admissions work? It seems like insanity! - page 2

Can someone explain to me how admissions works at nursing schools? I am confused when so many people tell me there is a "2 year waiting list." They make it out as though it is easier to get into med... Read More

  1. by   ♪♫ in my ♥
    Quote from TxMama
    Unfortunately for many of us, the process of actually getting into a nursing program can be extremely frustrating. For me personally, all of the universities close to me use a waiting list and there is an average 6-8 semester wait. There is one school about an hour and a half to two hours away from me that accepts students based on merit (which I am confident my accomplishments/gpa would result in acceptance), but it is simply too far away with my responsibilities as a wife and mother of four. Sometimes we have to be creative (which I have resorted to) in order to gain enterance ASAP. You can search for LVN programs at local community colleges and then enter a LVN-to-RN career ladder (accelerated program) which typically have a significantly shorter wait. Best luck to you as you explore your options and make an informed decision.
    I've opted for the 90-minute drive to and from clinicals. At least most of our "classroom" work is done online. The drive's gonna suck but it's only 18 months.
  2. by   TxMama
    Quote from ♪♫ in my ♥
    I've opted for the 90-minute drive to and from clinicals. At least most of our "classroom" work is done online. The drive's gonna suck but it's only 18 months.
    Good for you for going looking at the short period of time (in the grand scheme of things) instead of how bad it is going to suck! I really want to get into the university 90-120 minutes from me (merit based admission), but think the odds of making it work for my life is slim-to-none. As of next September I will have one child in daycare, one child in kindergarten (half-day), one child in junior high and one in high-school.... then me in college of course. I simply cannot be hours away from their day-care and schools. My clinical at that university would also be two hours away from home three nights a week. My husband's job-sites vary and take him anywhere from 1 to 3 hours away from home 5-6 days a week as it is. UGH! Enough of my rant... wish it were easier, but I will persevere one way or another! Best wishes to everyone out there and the lengths you have to take to earn your degree and licensure! MIND OVER MATTER!! :spin:
  3. by   fmrnicumom
    TxMama,

    I say good for you for doing what you need to do to make it work for you and your family! I am a mother also, and I know it can be difficult at times to make it all work. If I had the option of doing something and just "suck it up" for 18 months, I would. However, for me, once I'm in my program, it's 3 years. That's why I've put off starting longer than I initially intended. Keep up the good work!

    Tiffany
  4. by   TxMama
    Quote from fmrnicumom
    TxMama,

    I say good for you for doing what you need to do to make it work for you and your family! I am a mother also, and I know it can be difficult at times to make it all work. If I had the option of doing something and just "suck it up" for 18 months, I would. However, for me, once I'm in my program, it's 3 years. That's why I've put off starting longer than I initially intended. Keep up the good work!

    Tiffany
    THANK YOU Tiffany!! It is nice to hear from other busy moms who are giving all they have to maintain a happy family while pursing their goals. The nursing programs I am looking 5-6 semester in length like your program -- major committment for anyone much less a wife/mother. We all have our obstacles to overcome and this just so happens to be ours. When we do acheive our goals we will get the added benefit of our children seeing our accomplishments first hand. I always say, it is not a matter of IF I finish, it is merely a matter of WHEN I finish! You keep up the hard work as well! Thanks again!!
  5. by   ERGirl83
    Quote from jjjoy
    Hmm... a 3.6 GPA that usually includes a year of biology, a year of inorganic chemistry, a year of organic chemistry, a year of physics (with calculus as a pre-req, which means trigonometry and advanced algebra as well), maybe an upper division genetics or biochemistry course, and competing with students who majored in things like microbiology, kinesiology, etc and volunteered with medical services or worked in a research lab for a couple of summers... Yep, that's easier than 3.8 for nursing school...

    I agree that the competition for nursing school has increased exponentially in the last several years. It seems to be due to decreased student spots as well as an increased interest in nursing from those who previously weren't interested (eg, previous pre-meds who want to be NPs or CRNAs). Which makes the crazy process of applying to nursing school, each with their own unique pre-reqs, that much crazier.
    Actually, at my school, I had to take Chemistry, BioChem/Organic Chem (we get to pick one), Physics, Statistics, Pathophysiology, Anatomy, Physiology, on top of general biology (WITH lab), general Chemistry (WITH lab), English, Psych, Nutrition, Developmental Psych, etc.. The only class I don't have to apply to med school is physics, so the pre-reqs aren't any easier.
  6. by   ♪♫ in my ♥
    Could we please not digress from the point of the thread?

    It's not about whether it's more difficult to get into nursing school than it is to get into medical school.
  7. by   jjjoy
    Quote from DollBabyKG
    Actually, at my school, I had to take Chemistry, BioChem/Organic Chem (we get to pick one), Physics, Statistics, Pathophysiology, Anatomy, Physiology, on top of general biology (WITH lab), general Chemistry (WITH lab), English, Psych, Nutrition, Developmental Psych, etc.. The only class I don't have to apply to med school is physics, so the pre-reqs aren't any easier.
    Some nursing schools do require a one term non-lab ochem/biochem course. Most nursing schools do not require a year of organic chemistry with lab, which is required for med school. Physics isn't just one class, it's a year course, with lab. While a bachelor's isn't always required to apply to med school, it's VERY rare for someone to actually be accepted who doesn't have a bachelors. Like nursing schools only require a 2.0 GPA but if there's any competition for the spots and acceptance it merit-based, you know that a 2.0 isn't enough.

    I'm not saying that it's EASY to get into nursing school. It's most definitely not!
    Especially in those places where there's a lot of competition for spaces and you need a great GPA to get in the top of the pile of applicants. I'm just pointing out that it's not EASIER to get into med school.
  8. by   fmrnicumom
    Around here, I am within a 90 minute drive of several different options. One community college basically requires that you have had high school biology and chemistry or have taken them in college, and that you pass a math test. Then you are placed on a waiting list, which last I heard is 3 years long. There are several bachelor's programs which have differing requirements, but do not maintain wait lists. There are a few community colleges which use a point system, and because of the competition, you need to have nearly every point possible in order to be accepted. There are other community colleges which have certain requirements you must meet before you apply and then you are placed on a wait list.

    You will need to contact all prospective schools and meet with advising. This way you can find out all of your options and what it will take to accomplish your goals.

    Good luck to you!

    Tiffany

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