Help me please :(

  1. 0
    hey , Im a senoir in highschool and soon to be graduating. Im very interested in becoming a cnra and was worndering what was the best route to take. I was thinking 2 yr RN program at community college and then my BSN , while gettng my ICU experience since I would allready be a nurse . Someone help me please !
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  3. 11 Comments so far...

  4. 3
    Personal opinion - because you are in high school, I'd go straight into a BSN program. And focus on school, not dating, not marriage, not kids. I ended up going back to school at 38, becoming an RN with an AA degree at 40, getting my BSN at 52.

    Life can intervene and make it hard to finish school if you dilly dally around.

    I give this same advice to all young high school students - one good friend's son followed my advice, is working in an ICU right now after getting his BSN and married a nurse practitioner.

    Of course, listen to others who come on here to tell you their story.
    mzmae, Michaela, RN, and loriangel14 like this.
  5. 0
    Because life can intervene, I would suggest doing pre-reqs, then the RN program... That way you can start getting experience, having a steady income & be more independent in 2 years as opposed I 4.volunteer lots & take any hands-on experience you can get. If you choose to complete a BSN after your ADN, it won't take any more time or money than it would if you went straight through. I know you're convinced, at this point, that this is the career path you want, but studies show college students change their majors an average of 3-4 times before deciding on one.... And it would really suck to finish a 4 year program only to figure out nursing may not be the place for you... A much as i LOVE it, nursing is nothing like what I expected before nursing school & even less of what I expected it to be after nursing school.

    Good luck!!
  6. 1
    Since you are still in high school, a BSN would be a good ideal to go for. Yea it's longer than the ADN programs, but you will be graduating with your Bachelor's. Whatever path you choose, I wish you the very best of luck!
    Last edit by fc89 on Dec 5, '12
    loriangel14 likes this.
  7. 0
    Aim for a BSN program now. That will position you best to optain a working position in a high-acuity ICU. Then work for 2 or more years.

    By the time that you are reading for CRNA school, it will likely be at the doctoral level (DNP or DNAP). You will need at least a BSN degree before entering a doctoral program.
  8. 0
    Hello,


    Go straight to BSN!!!!!!! Don't you waste time, do it now. Its never too late but if you have the opportunity to start now, do so. Later on you'll find that dating, maybe children, many other distractions. Concentrate on your studies now.

    I am 26 and about to be done with my Pre-reqs. I feel like i graduated High School yesterday, but in reality i know i couldve gotten started earlier.


    Words from Experience,


    Good Luck to you
  9. 0
    BSN! Everyone is right! Life will happen and this is indeed the best time. No husband, no kids, enjoy college life while you can and go straight for the BSN. Besides, most hospitals do like BSN candidates best and a lot of ASN are going back for their BSN! The pay difference is not all that much but the education you will receive straight out of HS will be of an invaluable price to your life and no one can take that away. Good luck!
  10. 0
    Go directly into a 4-year BSN program. You will thank yourself in the future.
  11. 0
    I have to agree with Spidey's Mom and the others. Go straight into BSN.
  12. 0
    I agree with everyone else, if you have the opportunity, I'd do your pre-reqs at a less expensive community college and then transfer directly to a BSN program. That way it's 4 years and you're done and able to continue on in school after some experience to become a CRNA. Total=6 years of school plus experience.
    If you go the AA route you'll have to spend a year or so getting your pre-reqs done, 2 years in the AA program, then another year or two getting your BSN and then ANOTHER 2 years for your CRNA license 7-8 years of school + experience That's Also, while everyone would love to be a CRNA, you may find you like another field in nursing and may want to just become an NP in that field.


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