Help me Please!

  1. 0
    Okay so I'm applying to college soon, I have an 80 average and a 1500 sat score. I live in new york and I want to apply for a good BSN or RN-BSN Program in the state. I have a few questions.
    1)What is the difference between RN-BSN and BSN, which is the faster route to getting a BSN? pros and cons of both?
    2) What are some good schools(in new york) I have a good chance of getting into that have BSN or RN-BSN programs?
    3) I'm going to attempt to apply for some of the good schools like stony,hunter and binghamton but I need something to fall back on incase I don't get accepted. What would be a good school to fall back on that has a BSN or RN-BSN Program?

    This is pretty urgent and I appreciate all the help i can get. It would help me out a bunch if you numbered your responses to each question and didnt make it 1 big paragrah. Thank you so much for the responses in advance
    Last edit by HSstudentHELP on Oct 2, '09

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  2. 3 Comments...

  3. 1
    You can't apply for a RN to BSN program, those require you to have a RN first. With a BSN program you will be able to go ahead and get your RN as well. A lot of people chose first to go for their RN so they can work while finishing up the BSN. If you wanted to do this, schools like Kingsbourgh and Queensbourgh open up to you.

    As for what are good schools, it all depends on where in NY you want to go and what your willing to spend.

    LIU, CSI, Stonybrook, Pace, NYU, Columbia, College of New Rochelle etc are just a few off the top of my head that have programs. Your going to have to get into a school first and get through the pre-reqs before you can get into a program.

    I can tell you for a fact that an 80 isn't going to cut it for the Hunter program, I heard you need over a 3.5, but that's college GPA so if you wind up in Hunter just work hard on your pre-reqs.

    Good luck!
    athena55 likes this.
  4. 0
    1) An RN-BSN program is for people who attended a community college nursing program and got their ADN, took the NCLEX and got their RN. They're associate's degree nurses. In general, it's much harder to find work as an ADN nurse since so many BSN nurses are surfacing and a BSN is obviously preferred over an ADN. If you do manage to get a job as an ADN nurse, you're pay will be significantly lower, hence the RN-BSN program. This way, once they have their associate's degree RN license, they can do the RN-BSN bridge in about a year and get their BSN. I know there are a lot of these bridge programs available online, which is a pro. Also a pro would be the fact that it's typically cheaper and much easier to get into an ADN program vs. a BSN program. However, a con would be that it would take longer to get your BSN RN if you chose this route (about 3-3 1/2 years vs. 2 years, assuming you're a transfer student who has already completed prerequisites). If you're not a transfer student, add an extra 2 years to those times.

    2) I don't live in NY, so I can't help with this one. Google BSN programs in New York and you'll get a ton of schools (I assume...) and then look into each one's program description.

    3) Sorry, it doesn't look like I'll be much help here either considering I don't know New York or their schools. It's a good idea to have fall-back schools though. I know here in CA, people apply to basically EVERY school in the state that offers a BSN program because the competition is extremely fierce. If you don't have a 3.7+ GPA in the prerequisite courses, you're going to have a tough time getting in.


    I would recommend, seeing as how it LOOKS like you're coming straight out of High School, to go to a community college and take care of the prerequisites you need for a nursing program. This will save you THOUSANDS of dollars. Once you have all the prerequisites done (Micro, Anatomy, Physiology, etc.), you can apply to nursing schools and will be able to get your BSN and be eligible to take the NCLEX for your RN.
  5. 0
    Quote from bluechick112
    1) an rn-bsn program is for people who attended a community college nursing program and got their adn, took the nclex and got their rn. They're associate's degree nurses. In general, it's much harder to find work as an adn nurse since so many bsn nurses are surfacing and a bsn is obviously preferred over an adn. If you do manage to get a job as an adn nurse, you're pay will be significantly lower, hence the rn-bsn program. This way, once they have their associate's degree rn license, they can do the rn-bsn bridge in about a year and get their bsn. I know there are a lot of these bridge programs available online, which is a pro. Also a pro would be the fact that it's typically cheaper and much easier to get into an adn program vs. A bsn program. However, a con would be that it would take longer to get your bsn rn if you chose this route (about 3-3 1/2 years vs. 2 years, assuming you're a transfer student who has already completed prerequisites). If you're not a transfer student, add an extra 2 years to those times.

    2) i don't live in ny, so i can't help with this one. Google bsn programs in new york and you'll get a ton of schools (i assume...) and then look into each one's program description.

    3) sorry, it doesn't look like i'll be much help here either considering i don't know new york or their schools. It's a good idea to have fall-back schools though. I know here in ca, people apply to basically every school in the state that offers a bsn program because the competition is extremely fierce. If you don't have a 3.7+ gpa in the prerequisite courses, you're going to have a tough time getting in.




    i would recommend, seeing as how it looks like you're coming straight out of high school, to go to a community college and take care of the prerequisites you need for a nursing program. This will save you thousands of dollars. Once you have all the prerequisites done (micro, anatomy, physiology, etc.), you can apply to nursing schools and will be able to get your bsn and be eligible to take the nclex for your rn.

    THE 3.7 GPA FOR PRE REQS DOES NOT APPLY TO EVERY COLLEGE IN NEW YORK

    AN adn nurse IN NEW YORK does not get paid significantly less than a bsn, AS A MATTER OF FACT I DON'T KNOW ANYWHERE WHERE THERE IS A SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCE IN PAY. it is not harder for an adn to find work opposed to a bsn graduate. NEW GRADUATES HAVE BEEN HAVING A HARDER TIME FINDING JOBS


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