Fastest way to Nursing after my BS in Biology

  1. hey.

    I was wondering if anyone could suggest any possible routes I could take to earning my BSN/Masters in Nursing quickly.

    I already have a bachelors of Science in Biology, but i guess i've decided to do nursing.

    Does anyone know of any schools in Los Angeles that I could look into that requires the least number of years or months to complete a nursing degree?


    thanks!
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  2. 22 Comments

  3. by   sunnyjohn
    A direct entry MSN program would probably be the shortest route to a nursing Masters degree.

    An accelerated BSN program would get you through and into practice in 12-18 months.
  4. by   kgrands
    I'm finishing up my pre-reqs to start an Accelerated Nursing (hopefully June 2006). Most of the programs require certain courses before you can enter (ex. A&P I and II, Stats, Microbio, Chem (possibly Orgo too), General Psych, etc.) It varies by program.

    Here's a list of Accelerated Nursing Programs in the US.
    http://www.aacn.nche.edu/Education/pdf/APLIST.PDF

    And here's some links if you want more information about doing an accelerated program.
    http://www.aacn.nche.edu/Education/n.../nep_index.htm

    Good luck!

    katie
  5. by   2bnurse_it
    am i suppose to earn a BSN before i do the masters?

    in that case, would a school that has BSN and MSN be better?

    thanks!
  6. by   smile123
    Quote from nurse_it
    am i suppose to earn a BSN before i do the masters?

    in that case, would a school that has BSN and MSN be better?

    thanks!

    There are two different ways to get an MSN. Since you have a BS in another field, the accel'd programs are the best way to go. The first way is you get the BSN first (some programs like Johns Hopkins offer an accel'd BSN in 13.5 months) and then you spend 2 more years to get your MSN to go into advanced practice. It can offer you more flexibilty should you decide to stop after the BSN and work a year before going back for the MSN. You can defer entry for the MSN portion for a year or 2 years if you like.

    The 2nd is you apply for the direct entry MSN program. You spend 3 years: the first year or 18 months is spent taking all the classes to take the NCLEX national nursing exam; this will give you the RN and ability to work as a RN. Then the 2nd and 3rd year you will work on the MSN portion. However, if you decide to stop after the 1st year, you have no BSN, no ADN, nada, just a RN degree. This will be difficult should you decide to get a MSN later; they may ask you to make up more classes to get a BSN. So for the latter program, you need to stay in all three years.

    Both end up being the same amount of time. It's all a matter of personal preference, how much money and time you have on your hands. Hope that helps.

    Smile123
  7. by   2bnurse_it
    thanks so much. that was really informative.

    So if both paths take the same amount of time, I guess I prefer earning a BSN and MSN, vs jumping straight into an RN to MSN. (considering there's more opportunities with a BSN?)

    thanks!

    anyone in socal know which schools have the accelerated BSN and MSN program?
  8. by   selaz
    Hi there,

    I also have a B.S. in Biology and have decided on nursing. I have been out of college for 8 years now (been working in Marketing for Animal Health Products company)...decided on applying to accelerated BSN program. If there was a direct entry MSN program in AZ, I would do it...Most programs are pretty competetive, so I have decided on applying to ADN programs as well as AZ State's BSN program. Good luck to you. Do you have all of your prereq's?
    Last edit by selaz on Oct 3, '05
  9. by   selaz
    here is a list of ca schools:

    azusa pacific university

    http://www.apu.edu/nursing

    azusa , ca
    enrollment: 3,500
    school type: private
    accredited: yes
    online program: no
    degrees: bs/bsn, accelerated bsn, rn-to-bsn, msn, rn-to-msn, phd (doctoral)

    find scholarships to match this program



    california state university - long beach

    http://www.csulb.edu/depts/nursing/

    long beach , ca
    enrollment: 25,200
    school type: public
    accredited: yes
    online program: no
    degrees: bs/bsn, accelerated bsn, rn-to-bsn, msn, nurse practitioner

    find scholarships to match this program



    loma linda university

    http://www.llu.edu/llu/nursing/

    loma linda , ca
    enrollment: 970
    school type: private
    accredited: yes
    online program: no
    degrees: bs/bsn, accelerated bsn, rn-to-bsn, msn, rn-to-msn, nurse practitioner, phd (doctoral)

    find scholarships to match this program



    mount saint mary's college

    http://www.msmc.la.edu/pages/964.asp

    los angeles , ca
    enrollment: 1,200
    school type: private
    accredited: yes
    online program: no
    degrees: associate, bs/bsn, accelerated bsn, rn-to-bsn, msn

    find scholarships to match this program



    samuel merritt college

    http://www.samuelmerritt.edu/

    oakland , ca
    enrollment: 280
    school type: private
    accredited: yes
    online program: yes
    degrees: bs/bsn, accelerated bsn, msn, nurse anesthetist, nurse practitioner

    find scholarships to match this program



    san francisco state university

    http://www.nursing.sfsu.edu/

    san francisco , ca
    enrollment: 26,800
    school type: public
    accredited: no
    online program: no
    degrees: bs/bsn, lpn, accelerated bsn, rn-to-bsn, msn, nurse practitioner

    find scholarships to match this program



    san jose state university

    http://www2.sjsu.edu/nursing/

    san jose , ca
    enrollment: 28,900
    school type: public
    accredited: yes
    online program: no
    degrees: bs/bsn, accelerated bsn, rn-to-bsn, msn, nurse practitioner




    Quote from nurse_it
    thanks so much. that was really informative.

    so if both paths take the same amount of time, i guess i prefer earning a bsn and msn, vs jumping straight into an rn to msn. (considering there's more opportunities with a bsn?)

    thanks!

    anyone in socal know which schools have the accelerated bsn and msn program?
  10. by   Jessy_RN
    Seems like you lave lots of options. Best wishes to you in whatever you decide to do.
  11. by   2bnurse_it
    okay. so someone just told me that with a BSN, it's harder to do RN because i would be considered "over qualified" ..


    is that right?
  12. by   kgrands
    That's not true. A BSN is an RN degree - you sit for the same boards and perform the same work as someone who has an ADN. The only difference that can be seen between the two have to do with promotion opportunities.

    There has been recent talk about requiring a BSN for all nursing positions - a highly controversial issue. You can find a lot of discussion threads on this board concerning this issue.
  13. by   sunnyjohn
    BSN=RN

    ADN= RN

    Both are RNs. You certainly will not be "overqualified" as a new grad BSN.
  14. by   monnelise
    Quote from nurse_it
    okay. so someone just told me that with a BSN, it's harder to do RN because i would be considered "over qualified" ..


    is that right?
    I've been dealing with your same issues of which pathway is best after you already have a Bachelors.
    Where I used to live up in chico the main hospital primarily recruited the BSN graduates from Chico State even though we also had an ADN program at the local community college. It seemed there was more incentive for students to attain their BSN.
    Where I live now we have a community college which supplies our hospital with their recent ADN graduates. In fact, one nurse complained to me that the majority of their nurses were ADNs. So you can see how it might depend a little bit on where you're living.
    Just go all the way. Especially if you want to teach or specialize. For heaven's sake, there is a nurse shortage and we need good nurses.
    good luck

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