Direct Entry Programs- How hard to get in? - page 57

Thanks for all of your responses to all of my previous posts. As you probably assume, I'm evaluating all of my options including ADN, BSN, and Direct-Entry MSN. The direct entry programs look... Read More

  1. by   Raymond CA
    Oops, I'm sorry about that ...I didn't realize that you're planning to go to their ELMS-FNP program. I am just talking about their new ABSN. I don't have personal knowledge, but it's what I've heard from sources.

    From what I've heard from different friends in different programs, an older program may have its act together better.

    I visited Samuel Merritt and had a good impression of it and the people I met. I also liked the small college atmosphere, as you said. Maybe I spoke out of turn.
  2. by   karmyk
    Dude, it's all good. <3

    (You'll have to forgive me... the places I did my undergrad and high school educations really pushed the whole school pride thing. ;p )

    HOWEVER... you did bring up a good point, and the newness of the ABSN program, especially in San Francisco, is a very good factor to weigh when considering it as an option for a nursing education... I've also heard both good and bad things about the current program, but it's gotta start somewhere... Your point is a good one to follow, though. Hopefully, everything work out for the new students.

    Some of the new Direct-Entry MSN programs scare me because the information on the websites tend to be extremely vague.. But (ending on a positive note ) I guess everyone has to start somewhere. I've seen it done in my military time... and while many rushed programs have had their share of rough beginnings (*coughs*), a couple manage to pull through and come out as winners from the start (with their own few kinks, of course, because no program is ever perfect).
    Last edit by karmyk on Mar 17, '06
  3. by   pachouly
    Quote from future nurse jess
    BYU is Brigham Young University in Utah. They have a huge online course offering. And their online courses arent tied to a semester. You can start them any time and you have a year to finish them. They don't offer lab sciences though. But I figured I would take chem just to brush up - not as a formal prereq. Most classes are between $275 and 400 which is pretty cheap for around here (Boston).
    -Jess
    Jess,

    Were there any issues for you with using online courses for your pre-requisites? While I don't have a family, I work a lot of unpredictable hours and it is difficult to fit in classes. I was looking at BYU's course catalog and thinking of taking statistics and some psych classes there.

    Regards,

    Becky
  4. by   Jess RN
    Quote from pachouly
    Jess,

    Were there any issues for you with using online courses for your pre-requisites? While I don't have a family, I work a lot of unpredictable hours and it is difficult to fit in classes. I was looking at BYU's course catalog and thinking of taking statistics and some psych classes there.

    Regards,

    Becky
    I only ended up taking one prereq online- (micro w/lab through ccconline) but my school (BC) had no problem accepting it. I would check with your schools (where are you applying?) before enrolling, but I bet it will be fine. BYU is an accredited school and I think that's all they care about.

    Good luck!
    Jess
  5. by   pachouly
    Quote from future nurse jess
    I only ended up taking one prereq online- (micro w/lab through ccconline) but my school (BC) had no problem accepting it. I would check with your schools (where are you applying?) before enrolling, but I bet it will be fine. BYU is an accredited school and I think that's all they care about.
    I'll be applying to Boston-area schools: looking at BC, MGH, NEU, Simmons. I'd never heard about Regis until reading these forums so I've got to do some research there. I'm not 100% positive on what field I'd want to do the MS in, so evaluating schools based on the strength of that isn't working so well right now. Leaning towards pediatrics/acute care pediatrics.

    Becky
  6. by   BBQvegan
    I am taking General Psych online through BYU and it's a good class. I really enjoy the material and the instructor's feedback. Double check to make sure there is a testing center near you to take the midterm and final exams. I have to drive 30 miles to my testing center. No biggie. Anyway, the schools don't seem to have a problem with it. I def feel like I am getting a good education. Also, FYI, LSU has some very inexpensive online courses! I think I will take Dev. Psych and/or Sociology this summer through them. Website: http://www.is.lsu.edu/courselist.asp...el=CO&Online=0

    Good luck!
  7. by   Gennaver
    Quote from anc33
    Direct entry programs are not that difficult to get into. Much easier than trying to get into, say, Columbia as a freshman. Reason being, life experience and diversity are greatly valued in these programs. I would venture to say that it may even be easier to get into one of the aforementioned schools over many ADN programs as there are no waiting lists or point systems. You do need a solid academic record. The vast majority of my classmates came from very well respected schools and had A/B averages. I think our acceptance rate was something like 20%, but there were other programs at the school which had higher rates. PM me if you want more info.
    Hi Anc33,

    I think that the "not that difficult to get into" statement might need a qualifyer before it, such as: "if you have managed to put yourself through a four year univeristy while working and earning high enough grades to complete in a high enough gpa, and you take all the pre-reqs and also do sufficiently well on the GRE and the interview and your application packet is attractive". In that case, then yeah, its not that difficult to get into.

    Gen
  8. by   Jess RN
    Quote from Gennaver
    Hi Anc33,

    I think that the "not that difficult to get into" statement might need a qualifyer before it, such as: "if you have managed to put yourself through a four year univeristy while working and earning high enough grades to complete in a high enough gpa, and you take all the pre-reqs and also do sufficiently well on the GRE and the interview and your application packet is attractive". In that case, then yeah, its not that difficult to get into.

    Gen
    LOL I love it! Yeah, I agree that it is probably slightly easier to get into a DE program than to get into Harvard or Princeton as an undergrad... but it's still pretty darn hard! And back me up here- getting in is easier than actually getting through the programs- which are stressful, and tons of work! :spin:

    -Jess
  9. by   Gennaver
    Quote from future nurse jess
    LOL I love it! Yeah, I agree that it is probably slightly easier to get into a DE program than to get into Harvard or Princeton as an undergrad... but it's still pretty darn hard! And back me up here- getting in is easier than actually getting through the programs- which are stressful, and tons of work! :spin:

    -Jess
    Hello Jess,

    So good to read you, and back in the humongo thread of all things.

    Hope all is going well with your program, things are going just fine with mine. Coming up the to close of year one, ALREADY!! Wow, can't hardly believe it.

    This quarter is going so much better for me and I am sooooo glad that personal life issues have settled down.

    Life is tricky. A couple of my classmates have gone through major life changes and I am glad that we can all support each other.

    I highly, highly suggest that during the initial orientation of students in these programs to get everyone's email and start a personal group, like in Yahoo.

    At the group interview that I went to for UIC one of the instructors suggested that and I did it for my group at DePaul. It has been a real life-line of support.

    Gen
  10. by   VandyKalin
    Quote from GoodyNurse
    Thanks for all of your responses to all of my previous posts. As you probably assume, I'm evaluating all of my options including ADN, BSN, and Direct-Entry MSN. The direct entry programs look extremely appealing, but seeing that they are at the best of colleges, I don't know how easy they are to get in.

    Does anyone know what the typical GPA, scores, acceptance rates of these programs are? Anyone have any experience applying?

    I'm in MD, so I'd consider Hopkins, but Columbia, MGHI in Mass, Case Western, Vanderbilt, Pace, and Yale also look appealing.

    Seeing as nursing traditionally isn't an "ivy league" profession, are the credentials required for these programs less than what a typical "ivy" student would need?

    I'd love to hear experiences with any programs.........

    I finished undergrad with a Finance degree in 2004 with a 3.1 gpa... I got all A's on my science pre-reqs though, I think thats more important than the overall GPA... GRE's - I'd say to get above the minimum for the college (usually 1000, if specified) ... I got into Emory, Ohio State, VCU and Vanderbilt's MSN programs for non-RN's, and I'm going to Vanderbilt. I didn't have a perfect undergrad GPA or GRE's, but I think my interviews/essays helped - all the schools I applied to really emphasized the essay component of the application, especially making sure you wanted to do nursing and not practice medicine. Hope this helps! Good Luck.
  11. by   masstudent
    I was wondering what people have done for recommendations from professors when applying to direct-entry programs? I graduated from college back in 1998 and was thinking of asking a professor to rewrite a recommendation he did back then for a different program just having him change the type of program and date. However, I am wondering if the DE programs will wonder why I am using a rec from a professor I haven't seen since '98. I just feel that one, my original degree is from a good school and I did my thesis with this person and two, I really don't have two professors I want to ask from my nursing prereqs. I am having the professor who taught my anatomy and micro classes write a rec but the rest of my classes I have taken online so I am not sure how much an online professor will be able to write. Most programs I am looking at require 3 recs and I have the second rec coming from a nurse that I have done volunteer work under for 5 years.

    Also, I would like to ask the people writing my recommendations to note the school's name in the letter but since I am looking to apply to around 5 school's I don't want to make them list each school's name, program, and address, although I know it really isn't a big deal with computers being able to cut and paste. I know some recommendation provders prefer to just write a generic letter but I found one program that requires that the letter write complete their application. How can you be sure the person hs completed the form and not just submitted a letter if you waive you rights to inspect the letter. I have always waived my right since I was told schools might wonder why you didn't waive your right, if you might have been concerned that your letter writer had written something you didn't want them to now about.

    Does anyone know what the typical number of pgroams DE students apply to? When I was applying to college people were encouraged to have a few reaches, colleges that they had a good chance of getting into, and schools they had a high likelyhood of getting into. Unfortunately, I am not sure of any schools I have a good chance of getting into besides looking at the GRE scores and GPAs noted. I have decided I don't want to apply to any associate degree programs even though there is one near by since it will take me as long to get through that as it will take to get a BSN. Any info/advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks. VTprenursingstudent
  12. by   Jess RN
    I had graduated from undergrad in '96 and I applied to my DE programs in 04. I asked my prof who I took A&P 1 and 2 with for a ref and he did a great job. My other two refs were from the Medical Director of the hospital I volunteered at and from the CEO of the company I last worked at. I applied to three schools and used the generic form of the refs for all schools, I didn't want to ask my refs to do any more work. When all was said and done I sent a gift and a note to my three refs as a thank you- I think they were a huge piece of why I got into the programs I did.

    I think a ref from undergrad days would be ok if, like you said, it is clear that you worked closely with them and that is why they remember you and are able to write a reference these years later. On the other hand, if your undergrad was non-science I would try to ask one of your prereq profs for a reference. My A&P prof did a great job tying in my performance and interest in A&P to the kind of nurse I want to become- I definitely wouldn't have gotten that from my thesis advisor from undergrad, you know? Also, they will have your transcripts- and will know where you went to undergrad and how you did- I wouldn't stress over having a ref from a better-known school. Nurses are very pragmatic- they want to hear all about how what you have done relates to and tells a story about how you want to be a nurse- even academic nurses don't seem to be as impressed by pedigree. We have people in my program who graduated from community colleges as well as the ivy league- and they all are smart, hardworking, unique people who will be awesome nurses. I'm kind of rambling- but do you know what I mean?

    Good luck!

    Jess

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