Direct entry and graduate entry programs II - page 19

Hello all, Its been mentioned before about ending our thread and starting a new one. Think it was tried a few months ago. Maybe it is time now, seeing as the thread is 72 pages long. That is... Read More

  1. by   Jess RN
    Hey current nursing students at Columbia and Johns Hopkins- what kind of shoes did you get and do you like them? I think this was covered a while back- but I couldn't find the page. have to buy shoes and all they have to be is white and I was wondering which way to go- clogs or lace up sneakers.

    Thanks,

    Jess
  2. by   elizabells
    Quote from future nurse jess
    Hey current nursing students at Columbia and Johns Hopkins- what kind of shoes did you get and do you like them? I think this was covered a while back- but I couldn't find the page. have to buy shoes and all they have to be is white and I was wondering which way to go- clogs or lace up sneakers.

    Thanks,

    Jess

    mmmm, my danskos are so gooood. I have a lot of foot problems because I used to dance (ballet), and this is the first time I've been on my feet for 8+ hours and didn't want to die. They're about $110, so not cheap, but they're comfy, and people who have them have told me they last forever. You really do need to TRY shoes ON though. I know people who have worn Danskos and hate them passionately, and I'm in the pro-camp, which is just as large. It just depends on your feet. You can get clogs or closed-back, they're exactly the same except for the back. The thing is, the back part isn't supposed to "fit" as such. So the shoe still comes up and down in the back like a clog, it's just a dress code thing. I chose the clogs because the back drove me crazy in the store.
  3. by   smile123
    Quote from future nurse jess
    Hey current nursing students at Columbia and Johns Hopkins- what kind of shoes did you get and do you like them? I think this was covered a while back- but I couldn't find the page. have to buy shoes and all they have to be is white and I was wondering which way to go- clogs or lace up sneakers.

    Thanks,

    Jess
    Dansko's are my choice! I have the Dansko professional oiled clog in Blueberry (navy blue) with the covered heel; it is supposed to ride up on the back of the clog. They are very comfortable to wear around for clinicals. The school had another shoe as well at accepted student's day, but it was plastic and didn't breathe. Dansko's are worn by a lot of RN's and MDs, so I figure they must know what they are doing!

    You spend a lot of your day standing, so it's worth the investment for your feet! I bought mine for $100, but you can get them off Ebay for $65 to $75 brand new. I would suggest that you try on the exact size and model of the shoe you want and then order online. The styles fit differently sometimes. Since they are custom made, even the same size and style can fit just a little bit differently. So I would encourage you to buy from a vendor who has an easy return/exchange policy. Wear them indoors on carpet for a few hours and see if they are right for you.

    One concern: I'm not sure what sort of marks you would get on a white clog. I got the dark ones (we had a choice of white or blue) because I didn't want to show the dirt marks. But if you spray Scotchguard on them, they should be water resistant and do well.

    However, if you feel more comfortable and are price sensitive, then go for the tennis shoes. I rationalized the $100 price tag like this: I felt I would be using these Dansko's for years (they just don't wear out and have a great foundation platform!) vs. tennis shoes that I would need to change out after 9 months or so. Hope that helps!

    Smile123
  4. by   Jess RN
    Great! Thanks guys, I'll start with Danskos and go from there. The plastic/rubber type clogs actually appealed to me because I figured they would be really easy to clean. But I'd not thought about the lack of ventilation. Hmmm. I think the idea of soft fabric type lace ups really gross me out- because of the difficulty in cleaning. I want shoes that can at least be wiped clean and polished, you know? Sneakers get grimy so soon after you start wearing them. I also have really flat feet though, so sometimes it's hard for me to find shoes that are comfy. I'll definitely shop around and try on rather than buy online like I was thinking of doing- that makes a lot of sense.

    Thanks again!

    -Jess
  5. by   smile123
    Quote from future nurse jess
    Great! Thanks guys, I'll start with Danskos and go from there. The plastic/rubber type clogs actually appealed to me because I figured they would be really easy to clean. But I'd not thought about the lack of ventilation. Hmmm. I think the idea of soft fabric type lace ups really gross me out- because of the difficulty in cleaning. I want shoes that can at least be wiped clean and polished, you know? Sneakers get grimy so soon after you start wearing them. I also have really flat feet though, so sometimes it's hard for me to find shoes that are comfy. I'll definitely shop around and try on rather than buy online like I was thinking of doing- that makes a lot of sense.

    Thanks again!

    -Jess
    Hi Jess,
    Yeah, ventilation is a key issue. You want to be able to get rid of the odors and not feel sweaty in your shoes.
    You can order online IF the vendor has a good exchange/return policy. I would just go to a Dansko place, try it on and then order online. Of course, you need to keep the shipping charges in mind... Dansko are definitely good for wiping away stains (just imagine what we have to walk through on hospital floors (poop, vomit, blood, and other unknowns!). I would keep your clinical shoes separate from your house shoes, just so you don't introduce new bacteria into your nice home!

    Back to studying,

    Cheers!

    Smile123
  6. by   smile123
    Quote from breebunny
    Hi all. This is my first post here. I am getting ready to do applications for Summer 2006. I work full time and am taking the prerequisites at night. I am starting to study for the GRE now whenever I have time. I am trying to narrow down where I apply-- it sounds like many of you are from the East Coast. I live in Seattle and my first choice is Seattle University (so much easier not having to uproot my husband from his job and our families are here!) the problem is it is a tiny program-- they only admit 15-20 people a year! And there is a lot of competition. I'm also applying to Pacific Lutheran University (South of Seattle)-- but same problem-- tiny! I'm thinking of applying to the following schools:
    UCSF (not that anyone seems to get in there!)
    Boston College
    Virginia Commonwealth University
    Yale
    Vanderbilt
    Western University of Health Sciences (Pomona, CA)
    because their programs are bigger.
    Can you guys give me an idea of the competitiveness of any of these? I would apply to Columbia too but I'm taking my prerequisites on a quarter system and Spring quarter next year goes until June, but Columbia starts in May! oops. The main reason I'm applying to the above schools is I will have completed all the prerequisites in time to apply for next year-- many schools require a lot of chemistry which I don't have time to take.

    Can those of you who have gotten into schools (any schools, not just these) tell me a little about your GPA, GRE scores and volunteer experience?

    Between working and taking prerequisites and my 2 hour+ per day commute I don't have much time for volunteering. I've job shadowed at a clinic with an NP a few times, but that's about it. My undergrad GPA was only a 3.2, but that's because I majored in Philosophy which is not easy!! Any thoughts or tips would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks!
    Bree
    Hi Bree,
    Sorry for the delay! These accelerated classes at Hopkins have us going to class from 7:30 am or 8am to 5:30pm at night M - Th. Then we have to studying and do homework for the next day. On Fridays we have clinical and visit our patient (we are assigned to one to work with for the next 6 weeks). It's definitely accelerated! But I like it,

    UCSF is the most competitive in my opinion. I have known 2 people that have gotten in (both of them applied a 2nd time to get in) and one person who got in after being on the waitlist for her specific focus area in the MEPN program.

    I don't know about the others you listed.

    I applied to UCSF(MEPN), U of Washington (MEPN) , U of San Diego (MEPN), Seattle U (MEPN), and Hopkins (MEPN). I also applied to San Franicsco State U (accelerated 2 year BSN), DeAnza (CC for 2 yr ADN), as backup plans. (I didin't want to wait a year and not be in a nursing school!). I would encourage you to apply for BSN and ADN programs too! You just want to get that RN degree. You can always go back to school and work fulltime; some hospitals will pay for part or all of your tuition for further education once you have your RN.

    I applied to Hopkins as a last minute thing; I really wanted to stay on the West Coast, preferably in the SF Bay Area, so I wouldn't have to move. But Hopkins had an accelerated BSN program (13.5 months) and they were extremely flexible; you could apply to direct entry, defer for a year before going on for the masters, work full time or part time after the BSN, take full time or a part time load, etc. Plus, they don't require chemistry, so you could apply there too!

    I got into all of them except UCSF (700 people for 75 slots, of which there are only 5 or 6 slots for the specific focus area - I was going for FNP which is one of the most popular!), Seattle U (likes people who have worked with the homeless and underserved populations) and DeAnza CC (lottery only - trhey had 180 people for 24 slots). Who knows why you get into one school and not another?

    Stats: GRE: 760/800 Quant, 600/800 Verbal, 5/6 essay
    I spent 10 days studying for it, using a couple of books and CDs from the library, and the GRE CD you get in the mail once you sign up for the course.

    GPA: 3.3 U/G in Chemistry, masters in business admin (some schools give you more points with higher level degrees) What is your pre-req GPA? That will be very important; hopefully it's at least a 3.5 to be competitive. They usually do 2 types of GPA's: your U/G and your pre-req GPA.

    Volunteer: Lots! Children's hospital, Ronald McDonald house, Emergency Dept., Planned Parenthood Any volunteer experience in a health care setting is a plus. Even if you can only shadow someone, do a one time volunteer gig, or work on a project. I would definitely get some experience! It puts you in a better compeitive light for most schools. Then you can talk about your experiences in your essay.

    Your essay is very important because you can draw out the intangibles that are not apparent from stats. Why do you want to get into nursing? What are your goals? Why do you feel you are a great candidate for XYZ school? What types of experiences have guided you in this direction? What sort of adversities have you overcome? (working fulltime, raising a family, taking X # of credits in the eveing, etc.). What do you see yourself doing in the next 2 to 3 years after you graduate? In the next 10? They will want to know... The better you can articulate your ideas on your essay, the better you sound during the subsequent interview.

    The big thing is match the school's philosophy and programs with your background. Some schools emphasize the volunteer/direct health care experience. Others just want to know if you can do the work by focusing on the academic record. You need to look at the school's website and do some research.

    Good luck!

    Smile123
  7. by   soontobenp
    Hello all,

    My apologies if this has been posted already...I am a new member, and haven't had a chance to sift through all 72 pages of the thread yet. I am interested in applying for Master's Entry programs and becoming a Family Nurse Practitioner. I have a number of questions, and any suggestions or thoughts would be much appreciated.

    ~ I completed my BA in Environmental Studies, but did not have a GPA (we received narrative evaluations) and my undergrad school does not calculate GPAs. Has anyone been in a similar situation?
    ~ I have found only a few Master's entry programs--UCSF, Columbia, UNH, McGill. Are there others?
    ~ I work two full-time jobs, so have little time for volunteering. However, one of my jobs is in a mostly low-income medical clinic. Will my lack of volunteerism adversely affect my applications?
    ~ Does anyone have any experience with international nursing? I would like to go into this (to work with organizations like Doctors Without Borders, or similar) field, and am wondering if Family NP is too general for this type of work.
    ~ Also, I am thinking of applying to McGill, and am wondering if anyone knows of their program, and whether persons receiving their NP in Canada may practice in the US; and, if not, what might the licensure process be like?

    Whew. Thanks for reading all of this! I look forward to any help you may be able to offer. Thanks again.
  8. by   Peachy720
    Quote from smile123
    Your essay is very important because you can draw out the intangibles that are not apparent from stats. Why do you want to get into nursing? What are your goals? Why do you feel you are a great candidate for XYZ school? What types of experiences have guided you in this direction? What sort of adversities have you overcome? (working fulltime, raising a family, taking X # of credits in the eveing, etc.). What do you see yourself doing in the next 2 to 3 years after you graduate? In the next 10? They will want to know... The better you can articulate your ideas on your essay, the better you sound during the subsequent interview.

    The big thing is match the school's philosophy and programs with your background. Some schools emphasize the volunteer/direct health care experience. Others just want to know if you can do the work by focusing on the academic record. You need to look at the school's website and do some research.

    Good luck!

    Smile123
    Hey Smile!!

    Would you say that JHU emphasizes the first (volunteer/health care)? That's the vibe I get. [edit: also, if you don't mind me asking--if you do, please tell me to stop being nosy! --why did you decide to decline U of Wash?]

    I finally got to start volunteering in the hospital. I was able to get one of my first choices--the ICU! I was supposed to be just running back and forth to lab, placing orders, and whatever else they gave me, but on my first day, I got to find out how to bodybag someone (after taking out the foley, IV, and electrodes)..but since then, I've gone back to the ho-hum...but I still enjoy it immensely! Once I'm done with summer semester and the horrors of A&P I, lab, and Psych, plus working on weekends, I'd like to volunteer at the local hospice as well.

    I've enjoyed reading everything--I wanted to email you the day before your orientation, but things were a bit crazy. Very excited for you and hope all is well.

    Likewise to Eliza and all the other girlies...:Melody:

    Genn, very happy for you!! :hatparty:

    Take care,
    Tanya
    Last edit by Peachy720 on Jun 18, '05
  9. by   smile123
    Quote from soontobenp
    Hello all,

    My apologies if this has been posted already...I am a new member, and haven't had a chance to sift through all 72 pages of the thread yet. I am interested in applying for Master's Entry programs and becoming a Family Nurse Practitioner. I have a number of questions, and any suggestions or thoughts would be much appreciated.

    ~ I completed my BA in Environmental Studies, but did not have a GPA (we received narrative evaluations) and my undergrad school does not calculate GPAs. Has anyone been in a similar situation?
    ~ I have found only a few Master's entry programs--UCSF, Columbia, UNH, McGill. Are there others?
    ~ I work two full-time jobs, so have little time for volunteering. However, one of my jobs is in a mostly low-income medical clinic. Will my lack of volunteerism adversely affect my applications?
    ~ Does anyone have any experience with international nursing? I would like to go into this (to work with organizations like Doctors Without Borders, or similar) field, and am wondering if Family NP is too general for this type of work.
    ~ Also, I am thinking of applying to McGill, and am wondering if anyone knows of their program, and whether persons receiving their NP in Canada may practice in the US; and, if not, what might the licensure process be like?

    Whew. Thanks for reading all of this! I look forward to any help you may be able to offer. Thanks again.
    Dear Soontobenp,

    There is a search option on the forums. A lot has already been written about the topics you mentioned. You can also just google key phrases and you'll get more info. (I just did this on Google to answer several of the questions you posed.)

    1. You do need some sort of GPA so schools can quickly assess your application. I would advise you to talk to your school counselor and see how they could translate your evals into grade equivalents.

    2. MEPN programs:

    http://career.berkeley.edu/Health/NursApp.stm (has comments about some of the schools)

    http://www.allnursingschools.com/faq...es-nursing.php (lists more schools than the first list, but it is not an exhaustive list; for example, the U of Washington is not listed, but it started last year.) Go to the school's individual website for more info.

    3. You can either volunteer or work in a health care setting. It's good to get some other volunteer experience. You do have a plus working in a low-income medical clinic. Be sure to mention it in your essay.

    4. Yes, you can go into Doctors without Borders. They take medical personnel (drs and nurses, etc). See their website:
    http://www.doctorswithoutborders-usa...teer/index.cfm

    5. If you get a RN degree in Canada or outside the US, you still need to pass the US RN NCLEX licensure exams. Here's info about Canadian RNs working in the US: http://www.aldatech.com/CanadianNurses.htm

    There are some places that do not require the NCLEX (US exam) for Canadian RNs, but you need to check with the special hospital or heath care facility. For example, here's the one for UNC (Chapel Hill, NC):
    http://www.med.unc.edu/nursing/mainp...#documentation

    6. Look at these links under NP to ask specifically about NP licensure:
    http://www.advancedpracticejobs.com/...ePractitioners
    I don't know about NP transfers. You could ask McGill about their graduates and whether they practice in the US.

    Again, it would be good if you took the time to read some of the posts; use the search tool on the website. Several of us spent quite a bit of time already replying to several of these questions. Good luck!

    Smile123
  10. by   elizabells
    soontobenp:

    did you go to UCSanta Cruz? I did, and got into Columbia but not UCSF or UPenn. I did not have a GPA.
  11. by   Mission
    Quote from soontobenp
    ~ I work two full-time jobs, so have little time for volunteering. However, one of my jobs is in a mostly low-income medical clinic. Will my lack of volunteerism adversely affect my applications?
    ~ Does anyone have any experience with international nursing? I would like to go into this (to work with organizations like Doctors Without Borders, or similar) field, and am wondering if Family NP is too general for this type of work.
    Hi,

    I'm currently a student at Columbia. I did not have any volunteer information on my application since I've been working at clinical and/or managed care organizations for the last 5 years. I don't think it will matter if you have relevant work experience.

    You can get some information on international nursing from the "Volunteer and Disaster Relief Nursing" forum. I'm also interested in doing international nursing and doing FNP. Most organizations are desparate enough they rarely specify a specialty (check idealist.org for examples). I think it mostly depends what you want to do, Doctors without Borders, from my understanding, does not really focus on recruiting primary care providers since their focus is on emergency aid. However, there are many organizations whose emphasis is on offering primary care-in which case an FNP is ideal. I think you can find positions in international nursing in any specialty.

    Good luck!
  12. by   Gennaver
    Quote from Peachy720
    Hey Smile!!

    Would you say that JHU emphasizes the first (volunteer/health care)? That's the vibe I get. [edit: also, if you don't mind me asking--if you do, please tell me to stop being nosy! --why did you decide to decline U of Wash?]

    I finally got to start volunteering in the hospital. I was able to get one of my first choices--the ICU! I was supposed to be just running back and forth to lab, placing orders, and whatever else they gave me, but on my first day, I got to find out how to bodybag someone (after taking out the foley, IV, and electrodes)..but since then, I've gone back to the ho-hum...but I still enjoy it immensely! Once I'm done with summer semester and the horrors of A&P I, lab, and Psych, plus working on weekends, I'd like to volunteer at the local hospice as well.

    I've enjoyed reading everything--I wanted to email you the day before your orientation, but things were a bit crazy. Very excited for you and hope all is well.

    Likewise to Eliza and all the other girlies...:Melody:

    Genn, very happy for you!! :hatparty:

    Take care,
    Tanya
    Hi,
    Thank you!! Very nice to read you Peachy/Tanya.

    Good luck with the summer full of A&P and Psych too.
    Gen
  13. by   Gennaver
    Quote from soontobenp
    Hello all,

    ~ I completed my BA in Environmental Studies, but did not have a GPA (we received narrative evaluations) and my undergrad school does not calculate GPAs. Has anyone been in a similar situation?
    I have only heard of this and do not know how grad school consider this. Might be a very good idea to call them and see.

    Quote from soontobenp
    ~ I have found only a few Master's entry programs--UCSF, Columbia, UNH, McGill. Are there others?
    Oh yes, there are more, will see if this has been answered already too, (because I don't know right offhand where to find them!)

    Quote from soontobenp
    ~ I work two full-time jobs, so have little time for volunteering. However, one of my jobs is in a mostly low-income medical clinic. Will my lack of volunteerism adversely affect my applications?
    I would think that your job experience would cancel out the volunteerism need
    Quote from soontobenp
    ~ Does anyone have any experience with international nursing? I would like to go into this (to work with organizations like Doctors Without Borders, or similar) field, and am wondering if Family NP is too general for this type of work.
    Thanks again.
    Wow, this is cool. I wonder if community health nursing may be more appropriate but, am not seriously sure! I think that there may be similarities between FNP and community NP but, double check. Heck, you could always give a try to the most local WHO office to ask for any advice! Good luck!
    Gen

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