Associates vs Masters

  1. Hello -

    I am very interested in a career in nursing. I'm 31 and am contemplating a career change. I have a B.S. in Psychology and have been working in Probation and Parole for the last six years. I have read threads here that seem to indicate that an ADN is just as good as a BSN. Luckily, there is a great Tech School in my area that offers an ADN at a great tuition rate and no waiting list. I could sart in Fall 06. However there is an accelerated MSN program in the area (Northern KY) that caters to students that have Bach. degrees in other fields. It is brand new and would take five semesters to complete. The tuition when all is said and done would add up to $45,000. It would be appealing because I would like to further my education (MSN) whether in nursing and going to school later on or before getting into the field.

    - What are some of the advantages of having a MSN?

    - With the increasing number of MSN online courses - Is a MSN doable while employed in nursing?How long would it take?

    - What are the chances that an employer would pay for your education from ADN to MSN?

    - What would you do if you were in my shoes knowing what you know now? (Current Nurses)

    Thanks for your input!!!

    KW
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  2. 2 Comments

  3. by   suzanne4
    My personal opinion would be to go with the existing program, especially if you know that you can get it. You have no idea on how the other porgram is going to be if it is a start-up program. And the cost seems excessive.

    You should have no problem with finding an employer who will help pay for your MSN.

    I am sure that others will come along and say go with the MSN, but what happens if you need to drop for some reason, you will be stuck without a degree..............
  4. by   ladybugsea
    I am in a similar situation. There are tons of Direct Entry Master's programs in the Boston area. The main problem for me, however, is that I know I eventually want to be a CNM (midwife) and not a NP. It seems pointless to me to get an MSN in something other than what I want to practice. Also, I really think it makes sense to actually work as an RN before one decides for sure which MSN to pursue. Other issues for me are cost, communting or relocating, they are all full-time (I am married, have a toddler, and currently have to work part time at my engineering job to make ends meet).

    So I am hoping to get into my local CC. It's cheap (and we already took out 100K in loans the first time around and are still paying!), close to home, and a bit slower paced. If my situation were different and I didn't have my daughter and didn't have to work, I would be looking more seriously into the Direct Entry programs.

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