Another day...another worry

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    I'm worried that I don't have the demeanor to be a good nurse. I worry that I'm too sensitive and thin skinned (although this I've managed to overcome somewhat in my current job). I worry that I'll take home so much emotional baggage. I worry that I''m not "type A" enough to make it through school. I worry that in the face of emergency, all I'll want to do is run the other way. Maybe I'm having cold feet, or maybe my concerns are legit. Anyone else think about this?
    I can't believe, after all these years of saying I want this, that I'm just considering these things now.
    Could I just not be cut out for this?
    stewartfamily2010 likes this.
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  3. 9 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    While you see that as a negative thing it actually may be just the attitude nurses need. Patients need someone sensitive enough to be kind an gentle. As far as dealing with losing someone or seeing things , i believe nurses adjust over time to cope. Noone enjoys seeing death or illness. I think what you presume to be your biggest weakness may in fact be your biggest asset. When asked what your biggest weakness is this may be a good answer along with an elaboration.
    stewartfamily2010 likes this.
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    I've been feeling the same way lately. I'm currently working on my final pre-req before I can apply to nursing school. I'm also doing a CNA training program on the weekends and it wasn't until my first day on the floor that I realized I CAN do this! The first couple of hours were very overwhelming but after I took a break and allowed myself to breath I realized how much I can help and do for residents and patients. I am going to be an AWESOME nurse! Keep up the good work and remember self doubt is natural. You can do this!
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    Sweetheart you'll never know unless you try. you're already this far. Why not try it out see what happens and then who knows you might shock yourself. Maybe the gratification from helping those in need will fill the void. There are so many different fields in nursing. Pediatrics,surgical,neonatal, emergency room, just to name a few. One of them might suit you. we are our own worst enemy and tend to give up mentally before we do physically. Give those negative thoughts a mental kick & give yourself a chance and definitely more credit.
    stewartfamily2010 likes this.
  7. 0
    I agree that you won't know until you try!

    Not everyone is cut out to be a nurse, but I don't think you can figure it out by looking at yourself on paper. It takes all kinds.

    Thin skin can get thicker. You don't have to be a soldier, just enough to not break down on the daily. You don't have to be type A, just organized and detailed enough to get the job done and do it well. You may not be that way now, but nursing school is a phenomenal way to get to know yourself and grow. You never know who'll you'll be when you're done
  8. 1
    I felt the same way until my grandfather passed away. He had lung cancer and I spent a month or so caring for him and my grandmother before he passed. It was incredibly difficult for our family, but our hospice nurse was so sensitive and understanding. She really helped us through such a difficult time. I had always been afraid that I was too emotionally "soft" for nursing. I thought that I would panic in an emergency situation or that I wouldn't be able to handle it if one of my patients died, or that I would puke if I watched a surgery. But the experience with my grandfather made me realize that if I can handle all of that with my own family, then surely I can help someone that I don't even know! I decided to go for it, finished up a couple prereqs and applied to nursing school.They rejected me and I applied again. I got in the second time, made it though the program, graduated, passed boards, and guess what? I'm so glad I decided to pursue this career! It's difficult at times, but oh so rewarding.

    The more you experience, the thicker your skin gets. I lost my first patient during a clinical rotation. It was a bummer, and sad to deal with his family, but I made it and I feel good knowing that I did everything that I could to make him comfortable in his last few hours.

    You'll never know unless you try. I say go for it. If you hate it, at least you wont live the rest of your life wondering "what if".
    GrnTea likes this.
  9. 1
    With experience & exposure to patient care situations, you will learn how to compartmentalize - keep your own feelings/emotions separate so they do not interfere with your work. Your clinical decisions have to be based on the patient's needs, not your own. At some point, you will be able to maintain full objectivity - caring for your patients in the same manner that you would a loved one... BUT not becoming emotionally involved. There may be some situations that will always 'break the wall' and trigger your own emotions.. for me, it's terminally ill children.

    Trust the process - we all began at the same place. None of us were 'born' nurses.
    GrnTea likes this.
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    it can be a positive thing, what i think you really have to watch out for is becoming calloused and not seeming like you care. I've always noticed that when I went to the doctors office even as a little kid (of course, I didn't understand it then, but looking back now) that some people seemed "nicer" than others and i know now it's b/c they genuinely cared. The others, it was just work...not that they were bad, but there was a difference you can feel as a patient i think. It's OK to be sensitive, that is something that can make you one of the best nurses and people like that were one of the biggest motivators for me to choose this career path. You'll have some bad days and make mistakes, but you won't be the first one to ever do it, that's gauranteed.
  11. 0
    Quote from longhornfan
    it can be a positive thing, what i think you really have to watch out for is becoming calloused and not seeming like you care. I've always noticed that when I went to the doctors office even as a little kid (of course, I didn't understand it then, but looking back now) that some people seemed "nicer" than others and i know now it's b/c they genuinely cared. The others, it was just work...not that they were bad, but there was a difference you can feel as a patient i think. It's OK to be sensitive, that is something that can make you one of the best nurses and people like that were one of the biggest motivators for me to choose this career path. You'll have some bad days and make mistakes, but you won't be the first one to ever do it, that's gauranteed.
    Calloused is not necessarily bad. Calluses are what you develop after blisters. A callus prevents you from getting another blister in the same place (where something rubbed you the wrong way) and makes it possible for you to do that job from then forward. It's a body's natural response to injury. There's a good reason you can do that with feelings too, to keep yourself functional in the face of what you have to do.
  12. 0
    Never know 'till you try.

    I actually didn't think I could do it until I tried (took my CNA)


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