Am I making a bad decision or should I stick to the course?

  1. 0
    Hello everyone,

    I just got accepted to Nursing School here at my local college in North Carolina.

    I am really excited and nervous, but my fiance and family have really been motivating me to keep the course.

    I decided to go into Nursing not long after the economy went down in 2008. I was a logger at that time working hard during the week and farming on the weekends.

    I have always been interested in Nursing, but unfortunately I live in a very rural poor town. The nearest Nursing School was 2hrs away and there was no way I could afford to attend.

    After working my butt off I finally saved up enough money to afford school and rent. The school I attend is a 4 year program, so that means I can graduate with a BSN.

    I know this is a lot of information to share, but the reason I am is because I want to know if Nursing is really worth going into?

    I've heard conflicting stories about how Nurses are needed so badly and others say they cannot find a job.

    I really want a job, because I want to marry my beautiful fiance Lindsey, who I have been friends with since I was a kid.

    I want to be able to provide for her and I don't want to spend the next 2 years pushing myself in this career only to meet a dead end.

    Would it be worth going to Medical School vs Nursing School? Would I have a better chance at getting a job with a Medical Degree?

    I know it will require a lot more schooling, but if its gonna increase my chances of having a career, then I consider it worth it.

    I need some advice, some counsel.

    Please if anybody has some good sound knowledge to give me, please do so.

    Thank you
  2. 11 Comments so far...

  3. 1
    I would suggest you do some research on the job market for nurses in your area. Many people on this site say they can't find a job and no one will hire new grads.
    That was/is not the case in my area (upper Midwest) as I landed a job a week after passing the NCLEX. My hospital has been hiring new grads left and right!
    So, I just think it depends on what it's like where you live or if you're willing to move once you get your degree. HTH
    GrnTea likes this.
  4. 0
    The education for an MD or DO is completely different than for nursing. You really need to look into this. The important thing is to do well in school. During practicals try to learn as many skills as possible. Assist with as many procedures as you can. It'll pay off in the end!
  5. 0
    It really depends on where you live. It will take you a lot longer to become a doctor but if you do well in medical school finding a job won't be an issue. There is a risk of not finding a job after nursing school. As someone mentioned there isn't a nursing shortage. Research your area and see if anyone is hiring new grads.

    Sent from my iPhone using allnurses.com
  6. 1
    Choosing between medicine and nursing in this scenario does not even compute. You're comparing apples to dogs.
    Luckyyou likes this.
  7. 0
    Of course having a medical degree will increase your career potential. If you have the time, dedication, and resources then go for it.
  8. 1
    I live in California, the kiss of death state for new grads, but in my local (very rural) area, there are still a plethora of jobs available. Why? Because nobody really wants to live here. You say you are also from a rural area? Check locally to see what the market really looks like, you might be suprised. I think if this is what you want, do it!
    GrnTea likes this.
  9. 0
    Quote from Alisonisayoshi
    I live in California, the kiss of death state for new grads, but in my local (very rural) area, there are still a plethora of jobs available. Why? Because nobody really wants to live here. You say you are also from a rural area? Check locally to see what the market really looks like, you might be suprised. I think if this is what you want, do it!

    I'm live in the central valley where are you from? I see job postings for nurses from time to time but I haven't actively searched to see how jobs for nursesfare hear.
  10. 0
    Nursing jobs can still be found in the rural areas of this country. However, you may have to move to another rural area to get your one year experience under your belt.

    Now, med school is a lot, but doable if you really want that instead. If you become a doctor, you can work for yourself and open up a practice. If you become a nurse, most likely you will be working for someone else...unless you become a nurse practitioner and your state allows independent practice (which NC does not)...but that's a whole other topic!
  11. 0
    Quote from mwilso2318

    I'm live in the central valley where are you from? I see job postings for nurses from time to time but I haven't actively searched to see how jobs for nursesfare hear.
    Mendocino county. Lake county is not bad for employment either, but it's sort of the armpit of California. I've been actively networking since I decided on nursing (for sure) and have heard of a lot of unposted jobs that way.


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