Advice PLEASE - Considering Nursing @ 39

  1. Looking for advise...
    Thanks for reading!
    Last edit by Seven, RN2b on Sep 7, '08
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  2. 68 Comments

  3. by   colleennurse
    I don't think that your age matters at all. I was one of the younger people in my nursing class and I was 28 when I graduated. If nursing is what you want to do, then do it! I think people who are a little older ( I am not implying that
    39 is old can bring a lot to nursing because you have life experience and school cannot teach you that. Good luck!
  4. by   nurseangel47
    Don't let your age even be a factor in this unless your body is way beyond it's chronological age, that is. Because it is a very physical game, nursing. It does wear one's physical body down after years, though, knees, back, neck. Just make sure your tuition isn't too steep. Is that with living expenses thrown in also? Oh, just reread your post. Since it's a private college, guess it's just the tuition, huh? Well...if you have enough money to live off during the two years or so it'll take to get your ADN, then go for it!
    Don't let the vents in here scare you away, either. Too many student nurses and nurse wannabes come on and read our screaming, angry posts and think, no way, that's not for me...we scare 'em off! Not all nursing jobs are bad, not all nurses are bad. This is just a safe haven for releasing our shift or week's worth of frustration. The other nurses in here understand. No others in the family get us and no others but fellow nurses get it.
    Good luck in your nursing degree pursuit. I think it can be gotten through hard work, persistence, and dogged determination.
    May your hopes and dreams come through for you.
  5. by   kukukajoo
    Your tuition is a lot higher than a State college but doable. Where you are still collecting pay for a while, that should help. Also you may still be able to get into loan forgiveness programs which will help take the sting out of it on the other end.

    I say if this is what you truly want, don't hesitate, just do it!

    Best wishes in floowing your dreams!

    PS- I started this year being 37 and mom of 3 rugrats. Best thing I have ever done as I am finally doing what I want!
  6. by   Dixielee
    I don't see any problem persuing nursing at any age, but be careful about the student loans. If at all possible go to a public college at a fraction of the cost. Once you graduate and pass your boards no one cares where you went to school, how prestigious it was, or what your grades were. But you will be stuck paying off huge debts.

    Your initial salary as an RN will not come close to what you are use to making (depending on your location), and you don't want to feel "stuck" in making years of repayments.

    Some hospitals and states have loans that are forgiven with time worked in their hospital. You may check into some options before you jump into something you may regret down the road.

    My daughter is looking at paying back over $80 K in loans over many, many years and I would not recommend it to anyone.

    You should be able to hold down some sort of job while in school. Most of us did. In fact most I know who do it as an adult have had to work full time, so it can be done.

    Good luck.
  7. by   Daytonite
    for two years of private college that sounds right. if you were living out here in california i would tell you that tuition in the community colleges is only $20 a unit. so, to complete, let's say, 72 semester units would cost $1,440 + the cost of books. however, there are long waiting lists to get into some of the nursing programs out here.

    check your state board of nursing website for tuition resources. nurses are in such demand these days that there is a lot of tuition assistance that is available, but you have to look for it. you should also check out the websites of your state nursing association and your state department of education.

    if you've been doing customer service, then you'll do fine in nursing. in the early days of my career i worked in private duty and worked with many very wealthy clients. i know that some people look down their noses at having to "cater" to patients, but i found it very interesting and didn't mind it one bit. there is a difference, i think, between catering to someone and being of service to to them.
  8. by   Seven, RN2b
    Yeah - It is tuition only because it is a private school. The waiting lists are too long for public the public university/college programs in my area. I did mention that I am 39 right? LOL! I don't want to "wait" - I want to start ASAP. My plan is to get my CNA (a short course is available) and work as a CNA while going to school. With my severance pay covering almost a year - I'm thinking I can make the money thing work. Even though I have experience in what I do - and I can probably start somewhere at $40,000.00-$50,000.00 fairly quickly - The passion isn't there - and I don't want to do it. I want to work at something that I love and that makes a difference. Just a little scared about the $40,000.00 debt as a single person. Thanks for your advice. I truly appreciate you taking the time to response and send kind words.
  9. by   Seven, RN2b
    I know that the college I'm considering has a tuition assistance association with a hospital/healthcare affiliate - The contract requires you to work for them a year per every $____ they cover. My fear is - You're stuck - for up to 3 years and they basically control your salary and you could be making less than what is fair for your skill set. Is that possible?
  10. by   Seven, RN2b
    How do you check out loan forgiveness programs? Where do you go?
  11. by   Seven, RN2b
    Quote from daytonite
    for two years of private college that sounds right. if you were living out here in california i would tell you that tuition in the community colleges is only $20 a unit. so, to complete, let's say, 72 semester units would cost $1,440 + the cost of books. however, there are long waiting lists to get into some of the nursing programs out here.

    check your state board of nursing website for tuition resources. nurses are in such demand these days that there is a lot of tuition assistance that is available, but you have to look for it. you should also check out the websites of your state nursing association and your state department of education.

    if you've been doing customer service, then you'll do fine in nursing. in the early days of my career i worked in private duty and worked with many very wealthy clients. i know that some people look down their noses at having to "cater" to patients, but i found it very interesting and didn't mind it one bit. there is a difference, i think, between catering to someone and being of service to to them.
    thank you for taking the time to respond. i appreciate what you have shared!
  12. by   GeminiTwinRN
    I say go for it. I graduated today, at age 39. I didn't work until this last summer, and then did so as a CNA full-time over the summer and then part time this Fall during my final semester. You can do it.

    I understand about the waiting. It took long enough with the pre-req's!

    One thing to keep in mind. 3 years will pass regardless of whether or not you decide to pursue this dream. Why not go ahead and do it? Just think, in 3 years, you will have RN attached to your name, and you will still be 42!

    I went the CC route, and have about 8,000 to pay back. I can tell you that is not near as bitter a pill to swallow as 40K would be, but if I had had to do it, I would have done what you are doing.

    Good luck!
  13. by   USCUAmber
    Your tuition is costing you a lot of money but at my school for a 4 year degree it is costing me about $32,000 total. If nursing is what you really want to do though, I say go for it...you can do anything that you put your mind to.
  14. by   Daytonite
    Quote from RMBnAZ
    I know that the college I'm considering has a tuition assistance association with a hospital/healthcare affiliate - The contract requires you to work for them a year per every $____ they cover. My fear is - You're stuck - for up to 3 years and they basically control your salary and you could be making less than what is fair for your skill set. Is that possible?
    These contracts are set up so that if, for some reason, you decide to quit there is a pre-arrangement for you to pay back the money you owe for the tuition. No one can make you stay and work somewhere. It's illegal.

    Yes, it's possible you could end up making less than what another employer would pay you. Then, again, I've learned over the many years I've been working that it is not necessarily the place that pays the most money that is the best place to work in. It's usually the place where the people are the nicest and who you can get along with that you tend to work in longer. When I would sit down and do salary comparisons I found that after taxes the differences in hourly wages and differentials being offered often worked out to be nearly the same. Most employers are really smart. They bend over backwards, and in very sneaky ways, to find out what the competition in their neck of the woods is paying nurses and they meet it one way or another (in salary or benefits). While salary is usually what draws workers to jobs, it's satisfaction with the job that keeps them there--not the salary.

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