Advice PLEASE - Considering Nursing @ 39 - page 4

:idea: Looking for advise... Thanks for reading!... Read More

  1. by   Seven, RN2b
    Quote from catzy5
    wow thats a lot of money for school, are you choosing that because you can get in right away?

    I am 38 still have 3 more years to go if everything goes according to my "plan" lol.

    good luck to you!

    ps I go to a community college where I pay $20./ credit hour, however if I found a school near me that would take me without all these hoops and high grades and waiting I would probably consider paying more too.
    I can get right in. No waiting lists like many schools here. The tuition includes everything: books, scrubs, fees, etc. But, the more I think about it - the more the money sounds a bit out of line. Ugh! Decisions - Decisions! Thanks for replying!
    Last edit by Seven, RN2b on Dec 17, '06 : Reason: Spelling error
  2. by   Seven, RN2b
    Quote from LoriRN2B
    I am 38, just finished my LPN, planning on going back for my RN, by my count I will be 40 by the time that is finished.

    I left a 50,000/yr customer service job to do this and never regretted it. The year out of work has been a struggle, but it all came out great in the end.

    Best of luck to you...you can do it!
    Lori -

    Thank you so much for your response. Everything everyone is sharing is so helpful. It's a big step -

    A question for you - Why did you choose to become a premium member of allnurses.com? I'm definitely considering it - What a fabulous site this is! And, I'm impressed with the caliber of individuals who I've communicated with.
    Thanks Again!
    Last edit by Seven, RN2b on Sep 7, '08
  3. by   Seven, RN2b
    Quote from mixy
    I am 34 and starting ASN program in January. I finally learned what I wanted to be when I grow up!
    It's never too late to pursue what you are passionate about. I say go for it! The education will pay itself back with the first year of work, plus you will be working in a field you love for the rest of your life.
    Mixy - A motivator, you are! Thanks for response!!
  4. by   WickedRedRN
    Quote from RMBnAZ
    Lori -

    Thank you so much for your response. Everything everyone is sharing is so helpful. It's a big step - having chosen to leave a job with an excellent salary and 16 years seniority (but, the environment has been toxic, at best, for over 3 years now). And, being single with a mortgage makes the pressure of "getting things in order" a bit challenging.

    A question for you - Why did you choose to become a premium member of allnurses.com? I'm definitely considering it - What a fabulous site this is! And, I'm impressed with the caliber of individuals who I've communicated with.
    Thanks Again!

    Hey, no problem, glad to be of help. And I thought since I had been in a similar situation, I could shed some light on the subject. I was in telcom for years, the constant pressure to make sales, threats of layoffs was getting too much to bear. I understand putting things in order, we prepared financially for a long time, but in the end, the pressure of that nice $$ coming in was difficult. I took a part time job at 10.00/hr just for a bit of extra coming in. Also, I decided I could do an LPN program for a year rather than 2 years in an RN program easier. This way, I could get back to work in a year making good money instead of waiting 2. Should be easier to transisiton for me to RN as well.

    As for the premium membership...well I have been around here for a couple of years. I like the breakroom topics and the premium forums. Plus I thought since I get so much from this site, buying the premium membership is my way of supporting the site back. Brian is awesome and running this site for us is a great thing. I wanted to be a part of helping him provide this for us.

    Good luck and PM me anytime. I have SO been where you are!
  5. by   AZmom
    Accelerated programs are tough enough without working on top of it. I don't think what you're proposing can be done, quite honestly. Mind if I chart an alternate plan for you?

    Get your CNA like you have planned. While doing that, take the prereqs for Gateway's FastTrack LPN program: Certificate : Practical Nurse Fast Track : Nursing : GateWay Community College. It's only two courses -- a three credit and a one credit. I believe they both can be taken online through Rio Maricopa Community College, Maricopa County Community College, Rio Salado College for Distance Learning Online Education, Rio Salado Community College (who offers course start dates every two to four weeks for most courses).

    Apply to Gateway's FastTrack LPN program. If there's a wait to get in, start knocking out your prereqs for the RN program: http://nursing.gatewaycc.edu/NR/rdon...07rev51006.pdf (see page 7).

    Once you've got your LPN courses completed, you could go take the licensing exam, after which you could work as an LPN while you finished up your RN. Also once you've got your LPN courses completed, apply for Advanced Placement into the RN program (no wait as far as I know).
    Last edit by AZmom on Dec 17, '06
  6. by   Seven, RN2b
    Quote from AZmom
    Accelerated programs are tough enough without working on top of it. I don't think what you're proposing can be done, quite honestly. Mind if I chart an alternate plan for you?

    Get your CNA like you have planned. While doing that, take the prereqs for Gateway's FastTrack LPN program: Certificate : Practical Nurse Fast Track : Nursing : GateWay Community College. It's only two courses -- a three credit and a one credit. I believe they both can be taken online through Rio Maricopa Community College, Maricopa County Community College, Rio Salado College for Distance Learning Online Education, Rio Salado Community College (who offers course start dates every two to four weeks for most courses).

    Apply to Gateway's FastTrack LPN program. If there's a wait to get in, start knocking out your prereqs for the RN program: http://nursing.gatewaycc.edu/NR/rdon...07rev51006.pdf (see page 7).

    Once you've got your LPN courses completed, you could go take the licensing exam, after which you could work as an LPN while you finished up your RN. Also once you've got your LPN courses completed, apply for Advanced Placement into the RN program (no wait as far as I know).
    Wow! Thank you for your opinion, honesty and detailed "course" of action. VERY helpful! I'm so excited. I can't wait to get to work* tomorrow and start making calls, etc. (*short-timers disease - trying to get back some of the unpaid O/T hours I worked over the last 16 years! - Just Kidding...Kind of! ).

    RMBnAZ
  7. by   catzy5
    Quote from leslasic
    I say go for it. I graduated today, at age 39. I didn't work until this last summer, and then did so as a CNA full-time over the summer and then part time this Fall during my final semester. You can do it.

    I understand about the waiting. It took long enough with the pre-req's!

    One thing to keep in mind. 3 years will pass regardless of whether or not you decide to pursue this dream. Why not go ahead and do it? Just think, in 3 years, you will have RN attached to your name, and you will still be 42!

    I went the CC route, and have about 8,000 to pay back. I can tell you that is not near as bitter a pill to swallow as 40K would be, but if I had had to do it, I would have done what you are doing.

    Good luck!

    Congrats on fininishing that is so awesome!!!

    I am 38 and hope to finish by the time I am 41 so yes I agree with you, I will be 41 with or without my Rn degree its what keeps me going. I say going to school is my therapy, most of my family has cracked at 40 I am taking precautions LOL.
  8. by   qaqueen
    I have taken all of my pre-reqs for the RN program online. I lprefer not to sit in class and have someone repeat what I have already read. I know that one of the pre-reqs for the LPN program used to be HCC130, basically legal and ethical issues in healthcare. It is designed to make you think about the variables you face as a healthcare professional. You would have no problem doing that online (if it is still a requirement).

    One word of caution, if you take pre-reqs online and work, do not overload on your first semester. Some instructors expect a lot of work for low credit classes.

    Blessed Be
  9. by   danh3190
    I'm in a similar situation to you except I'm doing it 15 years later.
    I got laid off from an $80,000/yr job at the age of 54. I must say that although I usually didn't hate the job and often enjoyed it, I didn't feel a passion for it. To satisfy my lifelong interest in taking care of sick people I've been volunteering at a local EMS 12-25 hrs/week for the last 25+years.

    When I got laid off I decided to finally go for the RN. As you may imagine I felt the same sense of urgency to get going and get finished, only with 15 years more urgency.

    I got accepted immediately into a well respected 22 month hospital diploma program in our city. The tuition for that program is only about $15000 and they have a tuition forgiveness package if I work for 2 years in their system (the largest system in the area). I figure that I can get the RN and start working and then finish the BSN with my employer paying for it. Because I have a BS and MS in a science I've been led to believe I can finish the BSN fairly quickly. I've only finished one term and as far as I know none of us old folks (there are a bunch of 40 and 50 somethings) had any trouble, though it is a lot of work.

    So, depending on circumstances in your locale, I'd at least look into the hospital programs, if you have any, as a cost effective way to get to the same goal.
  10. by   Seven, RN2b
    Quote from qaqueen
    I have taken all of my pre-reqs for the RN program online. I lprefer not to sit in class and have someone repeat what I have already read. I know that one of the pre-reqs for the LPN program used to be HCC130, basically legal and ethical issues in healthcare. It is designed to make you think about the variables you face as a healthcare professional. You would have no problem doing that online (if it is still a requirement).

    One word of caution, if you take pre-reqs online and work, do not overload on your first semester. Some instructors expect a lot of work for low credit classes.

    Blessed Be
    Great information! Thank You.
  11. by   Seven, RN2b
    Quote from danh3190
    I'm in a similar situation to you except I'm doing it 15 years later.
    I got laid off from an $80,000/yr job at the age of 54. I must say that although I usually didn't hate the job and often enjoyed it, I didn't feel a passion for it. To satisfy my lifelong interest in taking care of sick people I've been volunteering at a local EMS 12-25 hrs/week for the last 25+years.

    When I got laid off I decided to finally go for the RN. As you may imagine I felt the same sense of urgency to get going and get finished, only with 15 years more urgency.

    I got accepted immediately into a well respected 22 month hospital diploma program in our city. The tuition for that program is only about $15000 and they have a tuition forgiveness package if I work for 2 years in their system (the largest system in the area). I figure that I can get the RN and start working and then finish the BSN with my employer paying for it. Because I have a BS and MS in a science I've been led to believe I can finish the BSN fairly quickly. I've only finished one term and as far as I know none of us old folks (there are a bunch of 40 and 50 somethings) had any trouble, though it is a lot of work.

    So, depending on circumstances in your locale, I'd at least look into the hospital programs, if you have any, as a cost effective way to get to the same goal.
    Thank you for sharing. This information will help in developing "my plan".
  12. by   Sheri257
    I just graduated at 45. Another woman in our class graduated at 48. Obviously, this is our second and/or third careers also.

    Nursing school didn't cost me anything because it was cheap to begin with ($5K at my California CC including costs of books, uniforms, etc.) and scholarships, grants, etc. covered those costs and then some. Of course, because it's so cheap ... there are waiting lists.

    Quote from RMBnAZ
    Just a little scared about the $40,000.00 debt as a single person.
    The only way I'd borrow $40K for school is if it saved me at least two years on the waiting list and the salary over two years was high enough to make up for that amount and then some.

    I'd do a lot of research on pay in my area before I'd take on that kind of debt. In California, where RN's tend to make more money, it's probably worth it but, in Arizona where RN pay is a lot lower ... probably not worth it.

    Quote from RMBnAZ
    I know that the college I'm considering has a tuition assistance association with a hospital/healthcare affiliate - The contract requires you to work for them a year per every $____ they cover. My fear is - You're stuck - for up to 3 years and they basically control your salary and you could be making less than what is fair for your skill set. Is that possible?
    I'd be very suspicious of these deals. Some of the hospitals in my area that offer them also have the lowest pay ... like $10K a year less base salary than most hospitals. They also tend to be horrible places to work.

    I'd also be very careful of the payment terms. With one contract, the students have to pay back $167 a week if they quit ... that's nearly $9K a year for five years.

    A lot of these contracts are nothing more but indentured servitude where the hospitals try to take advantage of students who don't know any better ... mostly because these hospitals can't get anybody else to work for them.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Dec 18, '06
  13. by   Seven, RN2b
    Quote from AZmom
    Accelerated programs are tough enough without working on top of it. I don't think what you're proposing can be done, quite honestly. Mind if I chart an alternate plan for you?

    Get your CNA like you have planned. While doing that, take the prereqs for Gateway's FastTrack LPN program: Certificate : Practical Nurse Fast Track : Nursing : GateWay Community College. It's only two courses -- a three credit and a one credit. I believe they both can be taken online through Rio Maricopa Community College, Maricopa County Community College, Rio Salado College for Distance Learning Online Education, Rio Salado Community College (who offers course start dates every two to four weeks for most courses).

    Apply to Gateway's FastTrack LPN program. If there's a wait to get in, start knocking out your prereqs for the RN program: http://nursing.gatewaycc.edu/NR/rdon...07rev51006.pdf (see page 7).

    Once you've got your LPN courses completed, you could go take the licensing exam, after which you could work as an LPN while you finished up your RN. Also once you've got your LPN courses completed, apply for Advanced Placement into the RN program (no wait as far as I know).
    AZ Mom -

    Can't thank you enough for your detailed "alternate plan" you provided me. I intend to begin my CNA course on 1/22/07. I went to Rio Salado today and spoke with an Academic Advisor. I signed up for the two pre-req courses (both begin 3/5/07) for Phoenix College's PCT (Patient Care Technician) course which I plan to take in August. I saw a PCT position and I think I would love working in that capacity while pursuing nursing. You must have your CNA to start a PCT position and gain your PCT within 12 months of hire. As you suggested, I plan on taking my LPN and RN pre-reqs on line through Rio Salado in preparation for their nursing program. The AA said I should be able to avoid the waitlist (once I get to that point) if I am already working in a hospital/healthcare facility. I'm so excited. Rambling somewhat! hat amount seemed consistent with the CNA programs approved on the AZBN website.

    Thank You! Thank You!

    Thanks to everyone who responded to my post. I appreciate your generosity!

    Happy Holidays!:Holly1:
    RMBnAZ
    Last edit by Seven, RN2b on Sep 12, '08

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