Advice PLEASE - Considering Nursing @ 39 - page 2

:idea: Looking for advise... Thanks for reading!... Read More

  1. by   dorselm
    If nursing is a field that you are truly interested in then I say go for it! I am 35 and will began nursing school in Feb 07 . I'm sooo excited. I will began CNA training on the 20th. I am going to a hospital based nursing school within UPMC where I will earn a diploma when I'm finished.Where I live UPMC is almost like a monopoly with hospitals all over Southern PA, a few in Baltimore and one in Italy so finding a job won't be difficult. I am going to sign up for the tuition forgiveness program so that the hospital will cover the tuition in exchange for 2 yrs of service when I am finished with school. I heard that there are some places that may pay my tuition if I decide that I don't want to work for UPMC so that I won't be stuck in the tuition forgiveness program. After I earn my diploma, if I want to get my BSN, there are plenty of programs that I can do online which the hospitals for pay for. I sometimes become very afraid when I read the different posts of how "nurses eat their young", how they're backstabbers and how some nurses are disgusted with their jobs. However, as one of the people on the post said, all nurses and all nursing jobs are not bad so I am going into this optimistic and pray that when I finished I'll be able to find the place in nursing where I belong. That's one of the good things about becoming a nurse. You are not limited in choosing the kind of nurse you want to be or the area in which you want to work. Do a check on the different nursing schools in your area and start comparing them to see which is least expensive and then see what prereqs you need to take and also start studying for the NET test. God bless!
  2. by   Seven, RN2b
    Quote from leslasic
    I say go for it. I graduated today, at age 39. I didn't work until this last summer, and then did so as a CNA full-time over the summer and then part time this Fall during my final semester. You can do it.

    I understand about the waiting. It took long enough with the pre-req's!

    One thing to keep in mind. 3 years will pass regardless of whether or not you decide to pursue this dream. Why not go ahead and do it? Just think, in 3 years, you will have RN attached to your name, and you will still be 42!

    I went the CC route, and have about 8,000 to pay back. I can tell you that is not near as bitter a pill to swallow as 40K would be, but if I had had to do it, I would have done what you are doing.

    Good luck!
    Woo-Hoo!! CONGRATULATIONS!! How exciting!!!

    Actually - school is only 2 years! If I went the CC route - It would be at least 3-4 years with being on a waitlist. My concern is the healthcare affiliate that the school, that I am considering, use that offers tuition assistance, for contract work upon graduation, doesn't impress me. I don't want to be tied to a hospital/healthcare company that doesn't impress me - to gain tuition $s. Even though it is a lot of tuition $s. $18000.00 total. But, I don't want to work in a low-standard/environment facility for 3 years - when I can pay the tuition myself and have choices in my employer, their standards, and work environment. Does that make sense? Thanks for responding.
  3. by   Seven, RN2b
    Quote from USCUAmber
    Your tuition is costing you a lot of money but at my school for a 4 year degree it is costing me about $32,000 total. If nursing is what you really want to do though, I say go for it...you can do anything that you put your mind to.
    Thanks for replying. I appreciate the support. Good Luck!!!
  4. by   Seven, RN2b
    Quote from Daytonite
    These contracts are set up so that if, for some reason, you decide to quit there is a pre-arrangement for you to pay back the money you owe for the tuition. No one can make you stay and work somewhere. It's illegal.

    Yes, it's possible you could end up making less than what another employer would pay you. Then, again, I've learned over the many years I've been working that it is not necessarily the place that pays the most money that is the best place to work in. It's usually the place where the people are the nicest and who you can get along with that you tend to work in longer. When I would sit down and do salary comparisons I found that after taxes the differences in hourly wages and differentials being offered often worked out to be nearly the same. Most employers are really smart. They bend over backwards, and in very sneaky ways, to find out what the competition in their neck of the woods is paying nurses and they meet it one way or another (in salary or benefits). While salary is usually what draws workers to jobs, it's satisfaction with the job that keeps them there--not the salary.
    Your reply has helped a lot. I can do the tuition assistant thing - and, if it doesn't work out with the employer - I just have to pay them back at a prorated amount. Make sense? I guess I didn't think that one through. How right you are about money versus work environment!! That's exactly why I am considering this careeer change at 39 (I've been with my current employer 16 years). We had a reorganization and I was offered a lesser grade position (with my current salary) or to take a severance package (of 32 weeks). Because the environment and people have been so toxic over the last 3 years (long story) - It wasn't even a thought to leave and risk being happy at work despite the risk of making less money/going to school. Smart Daytonite you are!
  5. by   Seven, RN2b
    Quote from dorselm
    If nursing is a field that you are truly interested in then I say go for it! I am 35 and will began nursing school in Feb 07 . I'm sooo excited. I will began CNA training on the 20th. I am going to a hospital based nursing school within UPMC where I will earn a diploma when I'm finished.Where I live UPMC is almost like a monopoly with hospitals all over Southern PA, a few in Baltimore and one in Italy so finding a job won't be difficult. I am going to sign up for the tuition forgiveness program so that the hospital will cover the tuition in exchange for 2 yrs of service when I am finished with school. I heard that there are some places that may pay my tuition if I decide that I don't want to work for UPMC so that I won't be stuck in the tuition forgiveness program. After I earn my diploma, if I want to get my BSN, there are plenty of programs that I can do online which the hospitals for pay for. I sometimes become very afraid when I read the different posts of how "nurses eat their young", how they're backstabbers and how some nurses are disgusted with their jobs. However, as one of the people on the post said, all nurses and all nursing jobs are not bad so I am going into this optimistic and pray that when I finished I'll be able to find the place in nursing where I belong. That's one of the good things about becoming a nurse. You are not limited in choosing the kind of nurse you want to be or the area in which you want to work. Do a check on the different nursing schools in your area and start comparing them to see which is least expensive and then see what prereqs you need to take and also start studying for the NET test. God bless!
    My plan is similar to yours. I'm planning to do a CNA course in January and begin nursing school in March. I'm wondering if I should find a hospital that I'm comfortable working in as a CNA and then complete my tuition/loan application based on what that employer offers. Because if I am signed up with hospital "A" is hospital "B" going to hire me as a CNA and can I make a change then. I know - I'm rambling. Just trying to "get things nailed down". Thanks for your reply. It was very helpful. Blessings!
  6. by   Era
    Quote from RMBnAZ
    Looking for advise...I'm 39 and I'm considering going to a 2-year private college for a nursing degree beginning in March. I'm a customer service manager making $65,000+ a year - but, my position is being eliminated and I will be unemployed in the next 30 days - but, receiving severance pay through Sept 07. I don't have a passion for customer service management (kind of "grew up" in the environment and ended up here) and often wanted/thought of pursuing nursing in my "younger days". My RN education is expected to cost approximately $40,000 (student loans). Is that a fair amount for tuition? I don't think there is anything but nursing that I would love as a career and still be able to make a decent living. Any thoughts, feedback, advice, etc would be greatly appreciated!

    Thanks for reading!
    If you hear 'the call' then do so.
    You're still young to start a career in nursing.
    Good luck!
  7. by   allantiques4me
    Im an LPN and at44 am considering going back for my RN,I too had reservations because of my age.But think about it,you could be working for another 25 years.Ya know what I mean?I say go for it.you will not be sorry.There is such a wide variety of nursing areas you could work.And as you do get older and less physical,you could still do homecare.
  8. by   Jesskanurse
    I know you don't want to feel 'stuck' by working somewhere for three years, but trust me, that first 1-2 years goes by QUICKLY. Honestly three years sounds bad when you want to get things done, but I would definitely think about it. Also, I didn't read all the posts but $40K for an ADN program is kind of ridiculous to me. I know you want to start and get it over with, but in the whole scheme of things a little waiting for saving that much money might be worth it to you. I owe $23,000 for my BSN program and I live near Chicago where we have kind of a high cost of living, just to put it in perspective. I just know how you feel with being anxious to start, but just make sure you aren't regretting it later

    Look into Perkins Loan as well!

    Jess
  9. by   Daytonite
    Quote from dorselm
    i sometimes become very afraid when i read the different posts of how "nurses eat their young", how they're backstabbers and how some nurses are disgusted with their jobs.
    i hate that phrase "nurses eating their young". just want you to know that this is nothing more than a cutesy idiomatic way of saying that a person (one person) has been nasty or bullying to another person. it has nothing to do with all nurses at all. in fact, there are people in all walks of life who exhibit this behavior. by not calling it what is really is, i believe we are giving the people who do it a justification for it. it is nothing more than bad, unacceptable behavior that many people are afraid to stand up and put a stop to. it's adults having temper tantrums. if not stopped, the people who perpetrate this on others continue to do it. there are ways of dealing with it. talk about this with your instructors when you are in your nursing classes. there is absolutely no reason for anyone to ever have to put up with this kind of behavior. and, if you are unfortunate enough to also be saddled with supervisors or managers who are milquetoasts and afraid to deal with it as well, it's time to leave and find a job in another facility because they are not interested in you or anybody else's job satisfaction.
  10. by   mvanz9999
    Quote from RMBnAZ
    How do you check out loan forgiveness programs? Where do you go?
    Call the hospitals in your area and ask to speak to the nursing recruiter. They have all responded very nicely to me. I tell them I'm considering entering a nursing program, and I have xxx questions. I was surprised at the time they were willing to give me.

    As to the age thing, it's fine. I'm 37, and have another year before I could attend. The debt definitely sucks, but how else are we to do it. I would rather not point out this fact....but you should figure in the money you are NOT going to make. I mean....my tuition is going to be rougly 16K, but I feel I have to add the salary I'm NOT making while in school, which raises the cost considerably.
  11. by   julie0125
    The average age in my class for nursing school was 34. One of my fellow students graduated at 64! Age really doesn't matter. What is so great about nursing is the variety of position available. I also came from a customer service background and it was helpful to have the knowledge and experience. I went back to nursing after 6 years of other fields and 3 rounds of lay-offs. My only regret? I wished I had done it sooner.
    Good luck to you!! Keep us posted on your decision!
  12. by   Seven, RN2b
    Quote from daytonite
    i hate that phrase "nurses eating their young". just want you to know that this is nothing more than a cutesy idiomatic way of saying that a person (one person) has been nasty or bullying to another person. it has nothing to do with all nurses at all. in fact, there are people in all walks of life who exhibit this behavior. by not calling it what is really is, i believe we are giving the people who do it a justification for it. it is nothing more than bad, unacceptable behavior that many people are afraid to stand up and put a stop to. it's adults having temper tantrums. if not stopped, the people who perpetrate this on others continue to do it. there are ways of dealing with it. talk about this with your instructors when you are in your nursing classes. there is absolutely no reason for anyone to ever have to put up with this kind of behavior. and, if you are unfortunate enough to also be saddled with supervisors or managers who are milquetoasts and afraid to deal with it as well, it's time to leave and find a job in another facility because they are not interested in you or anybody else's job satisfaction.
    here! here! i work in the call center industry (not healthcare related) and we have a handful of bullies who are allowed to make others' work lives miserable. hence the reason it didn't take a lot of thought to decide to leave and consider a new career. there are just as many bullies in the workplace (regardless of industry) as there were in school. in my opinion, intolerance should be established for bullies regardless of age.
  13. by   Seven, RN2b
    Quote from mvanz9999
    Call the hospitals in your area and ask to speak to the nursing recruiter. They have all responded very nicely to me. I tell them I'm considering entering a nursing program, and I have xxx questions. I was surprised at the time they were willing to give me.

    As to the age thing, it's fine. I'm 37, and have another year before I could attend. The debt definitely sucks, but how else are we to do it. I would rather not point out this fact....but you should figure in the money you are NOT going to make. I mean....my tuition is going to be rougly 16K, but I feel I have to add the salary I'm NOT making while in school, which raises the cost considerably.
    Thank you so much for the suggestion on contacting local hospital recruiters. I wasn't sure that they would be receptive or not. Based on some basic research that I've done on nursing needs in my area, Phoenix, we have one of the highest shortages in the country. Maybe that will be to my advantage when speaking with recruiters. Thanks again. I appreciate the time you took to respond.

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