ADN v BSN question

  1. 0
    I know these ADN v BSN posts are getting annoying lol, but is it wiser to go for BSN or just settle with ADN. Cause from what I hair ADNRNs get more experience than BSNRNs, but BSNRNs seem to have more job security and hospitals are starting to go "BSN Preferred" on requirements.
    Or is it smarter to bridge from ADN to BSN, if so how long does this take? Insights welcomed!! Thx
  2. Get the Hottest Nursing Topics Straight to Your Inbox!

  3. 6 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    I'm doing ADN first (start in August), then doing online (mostly, I hope) for BSN. I have heard that ADN gets much more clinical time than BSN students. Also, if you have to pay out of pocket like I do, ADN at a community college is way cheaper than university.
    LifeIsGood76 likes this.
  5. 0
    I am starting a BSN program in Oregon this fall and we get almost twice as many clinical hours as the surrounding ADN programs so it probably varies by area. If you e-mail the schools you are considering they will give you all those stats. I went with the BSN even though I was accept to 2 ADN programs as well because they had a higher retention rate, higher NCLEX pass rates, higher employment rates (Most hospitals in the area are Magnet meaning they require a BSN), more clinical hours, and small student to teacher ratio. It is much more expensive though but I was able to qualify for several scholarships that helped. I think you should look into the job market in your area and ask each school what there stats are like the things listed above.
  6. 1
    The answer for you, MaxwellHolmes, is the same as it is for every other prospective student. So you might want to read some of the other threads on the same topic. But here are a few of the highlights of those threads (the condensed version):

    1. You need to investigate your local job market. In some regions, new grad ADN's are having a lot of trouble finding good jobs. So be sure to thoroughly investigate what your job options will be before you decide on a school. The old "Get an ADN, get a job in a hospital that will pay for my BSN later" plan is not working as well as it used to. It doesn't work if you can't get a job ... or if your job choices are limited to employers who don't have great benefits. So please do not base your decision on that out-of-date advice. Check to see what the reality is in YOUR geographic area.

    2. The myth that ADN programs offer more/better clinical hours than BSN program is just that -- a myth. Sure, there are some ADN programs that provide more/better clinical training that some BSN programs, but that is not generally true across the country. In my region, the ADN programs are having trouble getting clinical slots and some ADN programs are having trouble meeting the minimal requirements required for their students to be licensed. Once again, you need to thoroughly investigate the quality of the schools in your area -- and not base your decision on out-of-date information or the personal biases of some annonymous internet posters who know nothing about where you live.


    3. As a general rule ... if there is a reputable, fully accredited BSN program that is a realistic option for you financially, etc. ... then I would recommend you do that program. The ADN-BSN route can sometimes work well for some people, but it is becoming increasing difficult as time goes by and the trend towards higher education for nurses gains momentum. Why take the chance if the direct route of a BSN is a realistic option? If the BSN is not a decent option for you, then there is no quandry. Do what you have to do.

    Good luck with whatever you decide.
    besaangel likes this.
  7. 0
    Quote from LoriKiersteadMattis
    I have heard that ADN gets much more clinical time than BSN students.
    Not necessarily true. Maybe if you compare specific programs but this is not happening everywhere.
  8. 0
    Wouldn't it be better to go ADN to BSN anyways than straight to BSN? You could save money and do it online. The former would be cheaper and hopefully faster than the latter.
  9. 0
    Quote from steelydan
    Wouldn't it be better to go ADN to BSN anyways than straight to BSN? You could save money and do it online. The former would be cheaper and hopefully faster than the latter.
    There's way too many variables to recommend
    which route to obtain a BSN for everyone.
    It needs to be decided on an individual basis.
    You can get advice given some of the variables, but one missing variable could change the answer.


Top