ADN or BSN?

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    My plan is to apply to any and all RN programs, casting a wide net and all. I had planned to apply to local RN programs at community colleges offering an ADN. They have a bridge program at a local CSU to do a third year BSN (this ADN->BSN bridge being different from an RN->BSN program). I thought this sounded great. It allows me to apply to several more programs (not just CSU and private universities that offer pre-licensure) and gets me a BSN in the end, which is MUCH needed here in CA.

    But several people in my anatomy class this semester seemed really turned off by the idea. "Why add the extra step?" is more or less their stance. While I understand that, I believe getting into the RN program is the hardest, once there doing a 3rd year BSN is relatively easy.

    Is there something that I am missing? Some down side to this? These students I've talked to are also younger than me and have the luxury of either commuting an hour+ away or relocating to other CSU BSN programs, so this can account for their opinion as well. I am a SAHM going back to school and my husband's job is our only source of income, so we aren't going to upset that apple cart.

    Just looking for some other opinions and thoughts.
  2. 7 Comments so far...

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    Firstly, congratulations on making the step towards becoming a nurse! I'm going for my BSN and I'm in the same boat; I took all the prereqs at a community college where the students were younger than me as well (this will be my 2nd degree). The reason most people go the longer route and bridge through the ADN > BSN is so that they can start working in a hospital while going to school. Most hospitals will even pay for the bridge as long as you devote 1-2 years to them afterwards.
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    Well...as another young person, I can tell you the reason why I'm choosing to do an ABSN as opposed to an ADN to RN to BSN is time (and also the fact that I just graduated with a BA and don't see the point of getting an associates (that's my own pretentiousness, so excuse me!)) But I think you would be better off doing an ABSN, unless you don't have a Bachelor's in something else (because you need one in order to be eligible to apply). With an ABSN, you would be able to get your BSN in 12-24 months, depending on the program you do. So you won't be in school "forever" and you won't have to "add that extra step." It's a more intensive program, but you get the BSN that employers want, and will be able to work after being in school for about 2 years max. I see it all as a time thing, but my end goal will be getting my doctorate, so that's why I want everything to be done ASAP. I hope this was somewhat helpful and not off putting!

    If this was TLDR; Maybe consider an ABSN instead of a traditional BSN vs ADN.
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    Quote from Redbeerd
    The reason most people go the longer route and bridge through the ADN > BSN is so that they can start working in a hospital while going to school. Most hospitals will even pay for the bridge as long as you devote 1-2 years to them afterwards.
    At least here in CA, I don't think you can get hired without your BSN. This program is streamlined as such that you don't stop to work as an RN, you go straight from your two year ADN program into your BSN. You apply at the start of your 2nd year in ADN and then start your BSN the following year. I'm not sure but since this CSU has both an ADN->BSN and an RN->BSN, I don't think you even stop to take the NCLEX, you would take it at the end of the BSN. In which case I really don't understand the student that looked down his nose at me for even considering a two year degree program, because at the end of the time its the SAME amount of time and I get the same degree from the SAME school.
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    Quote from Lexicon
    Well...as another young person, I can tell you the reason why I'm choosing to do an ABSN as opposed to an ADN to RN to BSN is time (and also the fact that I just graduated with a BA and don't see the point of getting an associates (that's my own pretentiousness, so excuse me!)) But I think you would be better off doing an ABSN, unless you don't have a Bachelor's in something else (because you need one in order to be eligible to apply).
    I don't have a previous bachelors, otherwise yes I would just do what you suggest. Or even a Masters Entry Level program. Have you looked into any of those? What state are you in?

    Also, as I said above... at least the two programs I'm looking at there is no time difference. The ADN program is 2 two years + 1 year BSN bridge. And the straight BSN is 3 years. Same degree, same university, same time. *shrug*
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    @Bets- I live in VA. The school I want to go to stopped doing the ABSN to MSN last year. But from what I've heard (from nurses who worked there) going straight from a bachelors to masters isn't a good idea because you're getting an NP after having no real experience working in your specialty. (You might do a few 12 hour shifts a month while in school, but you aren't working full time). I figure I'll work for a 1 year or two (depending on which masters program I want to do) and then apply to grad school.

    As for what you're saying, if they're both the same time, I would honestly just apply to both (if you can). If you can only do one or the other, I would do the straight BSN so you could just be done with it. You'll still get to work after completing them both, so might as well do the BSN.
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    Everyone has different circumstances. Do your research and then choose the option that works best for you.

    It sounds like you've made a very good choice. The only thing I would check out is if you can get an RN job with just an ADN in your area. Some hospitals won't hire without a BSN now, but most long term care facilities will. Also, you may not want to work with your ADN and instead go right on to your third year.
    Lexicon likes this.
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    Quote from Bets0417
    At least here in CA, I don't think you can get hired without your BSN. This program is streamlined as such that you don't stop to work as an RN, you go straight from your two year ADN program into your BSN. You apply at the start of your 2nd year in ADN and then start your BSN the following year. I'm not sure but since this CSU has both an ADN->BSN and an RN->BSN, I don't think you even stop to take the NCLEX, you would take it at the end of the BSN. In which case I really don't understand the student that looked down his nose at me for even considering a two year degree program, because at the end of the time its the SAME amount of time and I get the same degree from the SAME school.
    I talked to their counselor (csula), you do have to take your nclex before starting your third year. You have to have your rn license and gpa higher than 3.0 to start the bsn bridge. So that is rn-bsn. program. I will be doing that at csula. Also, 3 of my former classmates just graduated with their adn, all got jobs, here in LA. So it is not true that people with adn are not being hired. Most of them do the bridge afterwards anyway. Some just prefer getting a job prior because they need to feed their families. It is all individual. She can't do absn unless she has another bachelor degree. Like I say, everyone is different, has different circumstances and therefore chooses different routes, which may not make sense for some people, but for others, it works just fine.
    excited1 likes this.


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