ADN/BSN Quandaries ADN/BSN Quandaries | allnurses

ADN/BSN Quandaries

  1. 0 I received my Stage III acceptance letter! (yesterday) for my Nursing Program (Clinical/NUR111-224 equals Stage III) all other ADN core-educational are completed. My "issue" is where to go from here in a planning phase-

    So far...
    36, Married 12 years with 2 children (nine and two) and have worked for 3 semesters to maintain a 4.0 GPA and high 90's HESI A2 score, tutored Chemistry and Mathematics, active Phi Theta Kappa HS and 42 Credit Hours thus far for one of the 75 seats available in the program.

    Now...
    Working on 19 CEU hours this semester, including a pre-nursing class, 200 level Bio, 200 level Micro, plus two other fluff humanities toward my BSN, but my family is becoming second or third priority and I'm starting to suffer some burn-out. I'm 100% on the RN, no question. But my plan to do the BSN is starting to lose it's luster and I'm starting to develop some anxious issues toward the number of hours I'm committed to, plus the 15 CEU summer I have pre-planned to wrap up all the BS cores (NUR not withstanding). Now, the anxiety is starting to hamper my ability to be task-oriented and just work on all the classes.

    So...
    I can finish my ADN in 2 years from here, with NUR only classes and most of the BS core-edu completed (minus 15 CEU) and have the summer with my wife and children before my program starts in the fall, but I was pretty set on the BSN being vastly more beneficial and marketable than the ADN...but now I'm starting to see that this is 50/50 at best, and the BSN means a 15 CEU summer and another full 3 semesters. I'm stuck...love to hear some other perspectives-
    Last edit by Charlie Don't Surf on Mar 6, '14
  2. 12 Comments

  3. Visit  SlinkyheadRN profile page
    0
    Why on earth do you need to do CEUs? You should have an education before getting continuing education. Get your BSN. Also focus on school and your family! All that extra stuff is unnecessary, aside from networking, there is really no need to do all those extra things.
  4. Visit  Charlie Don't Surf profile page
    0
    Sorry, poor abbreviation selection- I was going for 'Core Edu' unit/Credit Hour
  5. Visit  SlinkyheadRN profile page
    0
    Quote from Charlie Don't Surf
    Sorry, poor abbreviation selection- I was going for 'Core Edu' unit/Credit Hour
    Regardless, you're going to have to have to get your BSN anyways and that time and those classes will still be in your way. Just bite the bullet and drop the extracurriculars. Trust me, no one cares about them.
  6. Visit  EmeryRN profile page
    0
    My hospital is phasing out ADNs and hiring BSNs. There are a few ADNs hired on my floor but you sign a contract saying you will earn a BSN in 2 years. I live in FL. And I just went straight for a BSN, but worked with ADNs getting BSN. Some have done it. I couldn't imagine working as an RN, w 3 shifts/week and working overnights like I do now, on top of nursing school. But ppl have. It's what you can handle and it sounds like you are a hard worker!
  7. Visit  Charlie Don't Surf profile page
    1
    From what I'm seeing within a three-county range is most hospitals striving for Magnet status with an 'all BSN+' staffing plan. However I'm getting feedback from some professors regarding the ADN being the root of Nursing, period. I've seen many posts about ADN being bedside, and BSN leaving the bedsides...but, aren't the patients in the beds? I've always been in upper management positions, not looking to deal with staffing/fiscal responsibilities...looking. to deal with patients, and try to find a Nursing position that allows me to help people the most, those people being patients...not accountants, stockholders or administration.
    NurseGirl525 likes this.
  8. Visit  EmeryRN profile page
    0
    I can't speak for ADN because I did BSN, but the I feel the differences in the courses are mostly due to nursing theory and evidence based practice. My BSN has helped me provide great patient care. But I learned the most from clinicals and experience on the floor. I guess BSN is more encompassing because of theory and such, and my program required hours spent in the community and doing some projects. But we still learned about critical care, ob/peds, adult health, etc and were graded on our nursing skills, critical thinking, and assessments.
  9. Visit  HouTx profile page
    1
    Quote from Charlie Don't Surf
    From what I'm seeing within a three-county range is most hospitals striving for Magnet status with an 'all BSN+' staffing plan. However I'm getting feedback from some professors regarding the ADN being the root of Nursing, period. I've seen many posts about ADN being bedside, and BSN leaving the bedsides...but, aren't the patients in the beds? I've always been in upper management positions, not looking to deal with staffing/fiscal responsibilities...looking. to deal with patients, and try to find a Nursing position that allows me to help people the most, those people being patients...not accountants, stockholders or administration.

    I think you're getting the wrong message. At this time, the 'great divide' (ADN vs BSN) is based upon the care setting - not the type of work (bedside vs admin). Hospitals (acute care) are transitioning to BSN staff as a response to a growing body of (research) evidence that the educational level of nursing staff makes a significant difference in acute care patient outcomes. The IOM has made a recommendation that all acute care providers have an 80% BSN mix for their RN staffs by 2020. This will not change in the future. I haven't seen any studies to indicate that the 'BSN impact' has discovered in non-acute settings.

    So - ADN nurses are likely to still have plenty of employment opportunities in the future, but not in Hospitals. Be sure to factor this into your decision and consider all the possible scenarios. For instance, you get that ADN and begin working in a non-acute setting because hospitals are only hiring BSNs. Then you obtain your BSN but still can't get a hospital job because hospitals will only hire inexperienced BSNs via their new grad program and you don't fit into that category. It's a common scenario reported here on AN.

    I understand your feeling of exhaustion and lack of motivation at this time. During the time when I was moving from LVN to BSN, I did not have a single "day off" for 24 months - I worked weekends and attended school during the week. Luckily, my hubs took up the slack with our pre-schoolers. It's not easy but you can do this.
    RunBabyRN likes this.
  10. Visit  16mm profile page
    0
    As a mom of two I struggled with the choice between ADN and BSN for quite some time! It finally came down to this. I knew I was going to go for my BSN no matter what so I felt it would be best to just get it out the way now. I called all the hospitals in the area and 2/3's are already BSN only. I'm sure more will follow in the couple of years it will take me to complete my BSN.03

    Also, If I did an ADN program I would finish the program and have to dive right back into another one for my RN-BSN. I'd personally rather spend any free time I have with my family than worrying about a bunch of papers to write. After the grueling nature of nursing school I'm going to need a break from school for a while.
  11. Visit  Charlie Don't Surf profile page
    1
    Quote from HouTx
    I think you're getting the wrong message. At this time, the 'great divide' (ADN vs BSN) is based upon the care setting - not the type of work (bedside vs admin). Hospitals (acute care) are transitioning to BSN staff as a response to a growing body of (research) evidence that the educational level of nursing staff makes a significant difference in acute care patient outcomes. The IOM has made a recommendation that all acute care providers have an 80% BSN mix for their RN staffs by 2020. This will not change in the future. I haven't seen any studies to indicate that the 'BSN impact' has discovered in non-acute settings.

    So - ADN nurses are likely to still have plenty of employment opportunities in the future, but not in Hospitals. Be sure to factor this into your decision and consider all the possible scenarios. For instance, you get that ADN and begin working in a non-acute setting because hospitals are only hiring BSNs. Then you obtain your BSN but still can't get a hospital job because hospitals will only hire inexperienced BSNs via their new grad program and you don't fit into that category. It's a common scenario reported here on AN.

    I understand your feeling of exhaustion and lack of motivation at this time. During the time when I was moving from LVN to BSN, I did not have a single "day off" for 24 months - I worked weekends and attended school during the week. Luckily, my hubs took up the slack with our pre-schoolers. It's not easy but you can do this.
    Thanks for the insightful post! My wife is getting ready to ban me to our RV for the remainder of the semester at this point. (LOL) I think I may look into altering the "pace" that I am rocketing along at, instead of finishing all my core-edu before NUR classes start, just going with the flow.
    RunBabyRN likes this.
  12. Visit  Charlie Don't Surf profile page
    0
    Quote from memphismom
    As a mom of two I struggled with the choice between ADN and BSN for quite some time! It finally came down to this. I knew I was going to go for my BSN no matter what so I felt it would be best to just get it out the way now. I called all the hospitals in the area and 2/3's are already BSN only. I'm sure more will follow in the couple of years it will take me to complete my BSN.03

    Also, If I did an ADN program I would finish the program and have to dive right back into another one for my RN-BSN. I'd personally rather spend any free time I have with my family than worrying about a bunch of papers to write. After the grueling nature of nursing school I'm going to need a break from school for a while.
    I was accepted into the UNC system BSN program, and a local (but well accredited and known) Community College's ADN program. While my goal was to take the full BSN route, there is substantial distance...and increased initial costs. With what I have done so far, post-ADN bridge into the a University of North Carolina RN-to-BSN program will mean 3 semesters only (fall/spring/summer) of all NUR-300+ courses and clinicals with no other core-edu, so a very focused 3 semesters (not too bad) or the full-online option for a what I understand to be a less than perfect NC university with very little general college requirements. I may be smug, or flat-out wrong, but I want the best Education for my money- I put 110% every day...and I expect that from my school as well.
  13. Visit  SlinkyheadRN profile page
    0
    Quote from Charlie Don't Surf
    I was accepted into the UNC system BSN program, and a local (but well accredited and known) Community College's ADN program. While my goal was to take the full BSN route, there is substantial distance...and increased initial costs. With what I have done so far, post-ADN bridge into the a University of North Carolina RN-to-BSN program will mean 3 semesters only (fall/spring/summer) of all NUR-300+ courses and clinicals with no other core-edu, so a very focused 3 semesters (not too bad) or the full-online option for a what I understand to be a less than perfect NC university with very little general college requirements. I may be smug, or flat-out wrong, but I want the best Education for my money- I put 110% every day...and I expect that from my school as well.
    I'm just telling you that the bridge programs are usually just papers, advanced assessment and advanced patho. It won't be the foundation of your practice. Just do the BSN first. You won't regret it
  14. Visit  NurseGirl525 profile page
    0
    It honestly depends on the job market in your area. Mine is perfectly fine with the ADN. Honestly, there isn't that much difference except a BSN has a few more humanities courses. How is a history or religion class going to help me be a better nurse. It's not. Until they have a different test and hugely different pay scales for a BSN compared to an ADN I honestly don't get it. I will eventually get my BSN but I am starting out with my ADN. And yes I have done my research.

Visit Our Sponsors
close
close