Pre-NP: Will having clinicals for matter for RN to BSN?

  1. 0
    I will be graduating from RN school in May and have thought a lot in the past about being an FNP or ACNP. I figured my current route takes me to an RN to BSN program and have researched a lot into different options; including online RN to BSN programs. However, some of those programs do not have any clinical component and is all coursework. Any idea if this will affect getting into a NP program?
  2. 9 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    Quote from Greggy14
    I will be graduating from RN school in May and have thought a lot in the past about being an FNP or ACNP. I figured my current route takes me to an RN to BSN program and have researched a lot into different options; including online RN to BSN programs. However, some of those programs do not have any clinical component and is all coursework. Any idea if this will affect getting into a NP program?
    I don't think the clinical component really matters or not. When I finished my RN diploma I enrolled in a RN-BSN program which had three courses that required clinicals. However my NP program has never asked me if my program had clinicals or anything like that and I don't think you can tell from the transcript.
  4. 0
    My RN-BSN did not have clinicals. I'm currently in a PNP program at drexel university. The lack of clinicals was never brought up.
  5. 0
    Quote from Greggy14
    I will be graduating from RN school in May and have thought a lot in the past about being an FNP or ACNP. I figured my current route takes me to an RN to BSN program and have researched a lot into different options; including online RN to BSN programs. However, some of those programs do not have any clinical component and is all coursework. Any idea if this will affect getting into a NP program?
    There are some fine programs out there, but be careful choosing an RN to BSN program that has NO clinical component. The reason I point this out: if a program is accredited by CCNE (Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education,) and seeks re-accreditation (or is seeking initial accreditation,) and does not have a clinical component- they will be disappointed... CCNE now requires a clinical component for all RN to BSN programs. Seeking an accredited RN to BSN program will be extremely important for you since you plan to continue your education beyond BSN... you want to make sure your credits will transfer to your choice of accredited NP programs.
  6. 0
    Quote from tfree
    There are some fine programs out there, but be careful choosing an RN to BSN program that has NO clinical component. The reason I point this out: if a program is accredited by CCNE (Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education,) and seeks re-accreditation (or is seeking initial accreditation,) and does not have a clinical component- they will be disappointed... CCNE now requires a clinical component for all RN to BSN programs. Seeking an accredited RN to BSN program will be extremely important for you since you plan to continue your education beyond BSN... you want to make sure your credits will transfer to your choice of accredited NP programs.

    Do you have something in writing that says this?
  7. 0
    Quote from tfree
    There are some fine programs out there, but be careful choosing an RN to BSN program that has NO clinical component. The reason I point this out: if a program is accredited by CCNE (Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education,) and seeks re-accreditation (or is seeking initial accreditation,) and does not have a clinical component- they will be disappointed... CCNE now requires a clinical component for all RN to BSN programs. Seeking an accredited RN to BSN program will be extremely important for you since you plan to continue your education beyond BSN... you want to make sure your credits will transfer to your choice of accredited NP programs.


    Do you have something in writing about requiring clinicals?
  8. 0
    As long as the program is accredited at the time a specific individual graduates, that person is a graduate of an accredited program regardless of what may happen with the school in the future.
  9. 0
    Quote from elkpark
    As long as the program is accredited at the time a specific individual graduates, that person is a graduate of an accredited program regardless of what may happen with the school in the future.

    Right but I'm wondering if there is documentation to back up the previous poster who says an RN-BSN program now has to have clinicals. I'm in an MSN program so it doesn't effect me directly but I have others in my life who will be doing an RN-BSN soon and interested of what was posted was factual or rumor.
  10. 0
    CCNE sent a letter to schools with RN to BSN programs notifying them of the changes. I am afraid I don't have that to share with you, but you can view the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) White Paper which outlines the recommendations by the AACN RN-BSN Task Force. You can view it here: http://www.aacn.nche.edu/aacn-public...hite-Paper.pdf
    The Task Force recommendations led to the changes in CCNE requirements. CCNE is not requiring a specific number of clinical hours, but all programs must have some clinical to maintain accreditation.

    I hope this is helpful
  11. 0
    Quote from tfree
    There are some fine programs out there, but be careful choosing an RN to BSN program that has NO clinical component. The reason I point this out: if a program is accredited by CCNE (Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education,) and seeks re-accreditation (or is seeking initial accreditation,) and does not have a clinical component- they will be disappointed... CCNE now requires a clinical component for all RN to BSN programs. Seeking an accredited RN to BSN program will be extremely important for you since you plan to continue your education beyond BSN... you want to make sure your credits will transfer to your choice of accredited NP programs.
    An accredited program is definitely the most important thing and is the one thing which I have made sure the programs I am looking at have.

    Quote from elkpark
    As long as the program is accredited at the time a specific individual graduates, that person is a graduate of an accredited program regardless of what may happen with the school in the future.
    This is good to know. I am heavily favoring Wyoming University and they are not due for accreditation again until 2020. Plenty of time to finish my BSN.

    Thank you all for the replies.


Top