new RN Grad with NP questions

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    Hello all! I am so happy to be graduating from ADN this week I am here asking for help regarding pathways to WHNP. I have a job lined up at a SNF (not ideal but have to get some financial load off my husband ASAP). I know for sure I want to further my education but dont know if I should get BSN before MSN...

    I hope to work for the next year or so while prepping everything to apply and hopefully find job in L&D or womens services. So is it worth the money to get a BSN to make me more marketable while waiting on getting MSN or do I stick with ADN and the jobs I can get while working on MSN?

    Also with 2015 being the year of DNP, how does that effect this decision?

    A little background on me that has impact on my decisions are my 2 and 5 year old and my age of 30 also living in South Tx. I do have an amazing support system! Oh and sadly my undergrad student loans are about 50K...I have a Bachelors in Psych

    Thank you so much for whatever advice you give, good or bad :-)
  2. 8 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    Quote from alltheway2013
    Hello all! I am so happy to be graduating from ADN this week I am here asking for help regarding pathways to WHNP. I have a job lined up at a SNF (not ideal but have to get some financial load off my husband ASAP). I know for sure I want to further my education but dont know if I should get BSN before MSN...

    I hope to work for the next year or so while prepping everything to apply and hopefully find job in L&D or womens services. So is it worth the money to get a BSN to make me more marketable while waiting on getting MSN or do I stick with ADN and the jobs I can get while working on MSN?
    Depends. Do the programs that you are looking into offer RN-BSN or just MSN programs? It is financially cheaper to do RN-MSN but not all schools offer that. I did my RN-BSN first, and despite paying more, I don't regret it since I ended up relocating to a part of the country where a BSN is pretty much required for hospital employment. If you want to get a job in L&D a BSN might help open more doors.
    Also with 2015 being the year of DNP, how does that effect this decision?
    That doesn't and shouldn't effect your decision as their is no DNP requirement for 2015 or for any year. So far it has just been talk and no state is requiring a DNP.


    Have you done much research into WHNP? My experience has been that they are in low demand and have a hard time finding work as they can only take care of women, but they don't do obstetrics. Have you thought about FNP or CNM?
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    Hi. I have been mostly looking at RN-MSN because I wasnt sure. You make a good point about most areas wanting BSN, I live near the Tx Med Center so even surrounding hospitals say "BSN preferred"

    Yes I have done research and that was something I was concerned about. Those I have spoke with in this area say both have hard times finding jobs but WHNP are used more frequently. Hoping the need increases in the coming years, I am willing to relocate if need be
    I did find a WHNP/ Adult Gerontology NP dual program so maybe that is an idea for me. My passion is womens health and delivering babies would be amazing but if I had to choose CNM or WHNP I think WH would fit me, I have not really looked into FNP yet.

    Thanks
  5. 0
    Quote from ChristineN

    Have you done much research into WHNP? My experience has been that they are in low demand and have a hard time finding work as they can only take care of women, but they don't do obstetrics. Have you thought about FNP or CNM?
    This is wrong. Especially in TX, since TX is one of the states that requires an NP have formal education in whatever area they are working in. WHNPs can do OB, they just can't deliver babies, but they can do the ultrasound and prenatal checks and post-natal care. Not to mention it is a much wider field than just CNM. They can do all of the well-woman checks, all of the birth control issues, including IUD insertion. All of the menopause issues and the whole breadth of gyn issues across the lifespan. If women's health is your passion that it is the best degree for you. OB/GYN clinics use them as well as fertility clinics. There are also some inpatient jobs working on OB/GYN floors. The TX BON website says specifically that a WHNP can do more, including in office procedures, than an FNP in the same clinic.

    As for OP's original question, my advice would be to get your RN to BSN and find a job in L&D. A SNF is not going to help you with your career goals and without a BSN (or being in school for one), you may find it really hard to get an L&D job. As soon as you have an L&D job (and your BSN completed), then apply for a WHNP program. If you jump straight to an MSN program without the work experience you may have a hard time getting a job after graduation.
  6. 0
    Quote from Annaiya

    This is wrong. Especially in TX, since TX is one of the states that requires an NP have formal education in whatever area they are working in. WHNPs can do OB, they just can't deliver babies, but they can do the ultrasound and prenatal checks and post-natal care. Not to mention it is a much wider field than just CNM. They can do all of the well-woman checks, all of the birth control issues, including IUD insertion. All of the menopause issues and the whole breadth of gyn issues across the lifespan. If women's health is your passion that it is the best degree for you. OB/GYN clinics use them as well as fertility clinics. There are also some inpatient jobs working on OB/GYN floors. The TX BON website says specifically that a WHNP can do more, including in office procedures, than an FNP in the same clinic.

    As for OP's original question, my advice would be to get your RN to BSN and find a job in L&D. A SNF is not going to help you with your career goals and without a BSN (or being in school for one), you may find it really hard to get an L&D job. As soon as you have an L&D job (and your BSN completed), then apply for a WHNP program. If you jump straight to an MSN program without the work experience you may have a hard time getting a job after graduation.


    NP vs CNM...not entirely true. CNMs can do everything an NP can do. I know many CNMs who do everything. The NP is the one limited as she can't so deliveries.

    Where I work...we have no use for inpatient CNM (I'm an L&D RN).
  7. 0
    Quote from IrishIzRN
    NP vs CNM...not entirely true. CNMs can do everything an NP can do. I know many CNMs who do everything. The NP is the one limited as she can't so deliveries.

    Where I work...we have no use for inpatient CNM (I'm an L&D RN).
    I'm disagreeing with you, but I think you have to be careful when saying that a certain NP can do something based on what you see them doing at work, compared to what their education prepares them to do. There are a lot of NPs working in areas and doing things that were not covered by their education. A CNM could learn, on the job, the stuff that WHNPs do, but it isn't what they are educated for. I think when someone is trying to decide which specialty education they want to receive, they need to look at what the education prepares them to do, not what they could learn after working for many years.
  8. 0
    Quote from Annaiya

    I'm disagreeing with you, but I think you have to be careful when saying that a certain NP can do something based on what you see them doing at work, compared to what their education prepares them to do. There are a lot of NPs working in areas and doing things that were not covered by their education. A CNM could learn, on the job, the stuff that WHNPs do, but it isn't what they are educated for. I think when someone is trying to decide which specialty education they want to receive, they need to look at what the education prepares them to do, not what they could learn after working for many years.


    I'm telling you as somebody who works with and is related to CNMs and well aware if their education...they can do gyn care and are educated about gyn care. I almost became a CNM and part of my education was gyn care. So you can disagree with me but I'm bit giving an opinion.
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    Lol sorry, I meant to say that I was NOT disagreeing with you. My point was just that people not sure which specialty fits them better to look closer that the specifics of the education and not just some of the jobs that a particular person does. That's what I get for posting before I've finished my coffee
  10. 0
    Quote from Annaiya
    Lol sorry, I meant to say that I was NOT disagreeing with you. My point was just that people not sure which specialty fits them better to look closer that the specifics of the education and not just some of the jobs that a particular person does. That's what I get for posting before I've finished my coffee

    Lol...yay I'm not in a weird universe. Lol. My mother is actually a CNM and an OBGYN-NP (she's "older" and has an older NP). She does everything and then some. She did her NP first and went back for he CNM because she wanted back in the delivery room.


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