Hospitalist NP?

  1. 0
    I'm being considered for a job in critical care in a hospital. I'm trying to figure out my career trajectory.

    While browsing the hospital's job site, I saw a posting for Hospitalist NP. Good benefits and training. It would be under Apogee.

    One of the requirements is 2 yr NP experience in adult internal medicine. What kind of NP program should I look into?

    Can you tell me about this job? Will you still be able to work as a private practice NP?

    Thanks!
  2. 4 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    It seems to now be the trend for NPs working in the hospital to be licensed as an ACNP or ANP. Here where I live, in the rural south, we don't have many, if any ACNPs or ANPs, everyone that I've seen is an FNP. So we have some FNPs working in the CVICU and as hospitalists here, but this seems less common in more urban like areas.
  4. 0
    Quote from PatMac10,SN
    It seems to now be the trend for NPs working in the hospital to be licensed as an ACNP or ANP. Here where I live, in the rural south, we don't have many, if any ACNPs or ANPs, everyone that I've seen is an FNP. So we have some FNPs working in the CVICU and as hospitalists here, but this seems less common in more urban like areas.
    Thanks, Pat, for the feedback!

    I do want to still be in hospitals but be flexible enough to do like urgent care or private clinic with a physician when off duty. Better work and save up while younger!

    I've been reading that FNP is more flexible in terms of employment (?). Some say that ACNP programs teach more skills.

    I guess I would have to shadow an NP to get better ideas. For now, I'd be gathering experience as a bedside nurse.
  5. 1
    A FNP is a primary care role, prepares you well for primary care settings (not inpatient settings). If you are interested in a hospitalist role, I would recommend pursuing a Adult-Gerontology Acute Care NP program. We're had students in our ACNP program focus on a hospitalist track and then go into such roles at community hospitals after graduation.
    traumaRUs likes this.
  6. 0
    Quote from UVA Grad Nursing
    A FNP is a primary care role, prepares you well for primary care settings (not inpatient settings). If you are interested in a hospitalist role, I would recommend pursuing a Adult-Gerontology Acute Care NP program. We're had students in our ACNP program focus on a hospitalist track and then go into such roles at community hospitals after graduation.
    This can vary according to the program. Some FNP curriculums and clinicals cover emergent care and have inpatient and ER rotations. However, it seems that most acute care healthcare facilities still require ACNP for emergent or critical care units. This can also vary by region.

    I think it is good to consider the hiring standard and practices of the facilities you wish to work at? Find out what they want out their Hired NPs, you may find that FNP may suffice, more so in rural areas however. Then look at what you really want to do.


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