Frontier Nursing University

  1. 3
    I am looking to do my FNP program through Frontier Midwifery University/Frontier Nursing University since I love that its main emphasis is women's health and I've always been drawn to that specialty. I've been reading around and seeing that many are saying the program is tough but oh so worth it. How is this program considered "tough"? Is it tough because of the amount of reading/work that is required? The number of assignments? The projects? The demands? Can you please elaborate?

    I am looking to apply to begin in 2013 and have been looking at this school since I graduated with my BSN. My only question is whether I will be able to adequately manage my time between full time work as an RN (which I now have my year of experience in med-surg/onc), my two younger children (beginning elementary years) and then Frontier part time..... Is it possible or will I be sacrificing something? Yes, I understand I won't have nearly add much free time add I do now, but I also don't want to sacrifice too much....

    One last question: What is the workload like during a typical week for part time (2 classes)? How many hours of reading? How many hours of assignments? Studying? Etc. Also, once the clinical portion starts, How many hours per week is required and is it possible to continue to work full time during that portion?

    Thank you!
    Last edit by MystyqueOne on Jul 20, '12
    PatMac10,RN, Blanca R, and Joe V like this.
  2. 14 Comments so far...

  3. 1
    Anybody have any advice or answers???
    PatMac10,RN likes this.
  4. 2
    I am an FNP graduate from Frontier(Graduated end of March). I completed the program as a full time student vs going part time. At the beginning of the program, I worked night shift Fri Sat Sun then cut my hrs to PT night shift for the second half of the program. I left my position when I started clinicals so I could finish sooner. I know students who worked FT and took classes PT. It is a strong program with a lot of reading and in each class there usually is a paper or some sort of project--some classes are set up so you work in groups. It is challenging and you give up your life for the time you are in the program. I don't have children so my daily schedule was that I was on the computer at 0800 to 1500 then 1900 to 0200-Pretty much everyday.I don't know what your work schedule is (day shift vs eve or nights). I know students who completed the program with newborns , toddlers etc. They had to sacrifice time with family but in the end it was worth it.
    PatMac10,RN and zmansc like this.
  5. 0
    Hi,
    Thank you very much for this great response. I applied to the program for part time. Even though it'll take me slight bit longer, I think that would fit best for me and my life right now. I work day shifts, 0730-2000 three days a week with one 8-hour shift in addition within the two week pay period (to equal a total of 80 hours per pay period).

    Did you have to use that test proctor device? How did that work out? I've never heard of such a thing before.

    Also, how was the frontier bound at the beginning of the program and the clinical bound just before your clinicals? How is the environment? The people? Were the days long? Fast paced? What about the costs regarding those "bounds"?

    Thanks a bunch!
  6. 0
    Part time is the best way to go since you are working full time. Full time is possible but the sacrifice is great.
    The test proctor device began after I graduated so I don't really know anything about it.
    Frontier Bound (FB)is awesome. Meet as many of your classmates as you can from all the programs because everyone needs everyone especially when doing group projects. Also find one or 2 classmates that will become your best cyber friends! I have 2-one in the FNP program and 1 who is in the midwifery program and we moaned and groaned through the whole program together. We haven't seen each other since we went to FB together in Feb 2010 and we will see each other again at graduation this October. The 3 of us have emailed throughout the whole program- crying, laughing, moaning and groaning together!
    You are busy during FB and tired when it is completed but your fears are gone and you will be excited to state the program. Clinical bound (CB) different kind of atmosphere and you meet a different group of students but you do solidify into a unit. My CB group formed a facebook group so we were able to moan and groan together and as each one completed their comprehensive exam and then certification exams and job searches we all celebrated together.
    Frontier is all about family and wide neighborhoods (you will appreciate that phrase when you are accepted into the program and read Mary Breckinridge's book Wide Neighborhoods( a requirement before attending FB- they send you the book)
    I'm sorry to say I can't remember the costs of the bounds---I think clinical bound was around $700 but that was last year's cost as I attended CB last July.
    Good luck
    Let us know when you are accepted
    Any other questions just let me know
  7. 0
    Hi bkshoe,

    I'm new to this website and saw you attended Frontier Nursing's FNP program. I'm attempting to apply and have had a lot of problems- getting ahold of people, getting responses from them , getting my statistics class accepted, and now just trying to pay them and sign up for their statistics class so I can apply. It's not giving me a good impression of attending an online program with them. Did you have any similar experiences? What was your impressions of the school and how was overall communication? If you don't mind adding me as a friend maybe we could chat privately if you'd prefer that? Thank you for your advice/input!
  8. 0
    I'm sorry you are having difficulties. I never had any problems contacting them or getting replies. Did you call and ask for the registrar? I had to take a Statistics class prior to starting but I went through the University of Utah-online as that was a course they accepted and I think less expensive then their statistics course. I also had to take the health assessment and history taking course from Frontier as my course from my RN program didn't meet their requirements - no big deal and I am glad I took it. I feel well prepared as a graduate.
    I am not sure how to friend as I am new to this site also.
  9. 1
    I Graduated from Frontier's FNP program last November. I did the full-time program and worked full-time in the beginning, then down to part-time, then just one shift a week while in clinical because I just wanted to get it done (and I was pregnant, trying to finish clinical before I had the baby, which I did just barely. I never had any problems getting hold of anyone and I think they have a top-notch tech support group for any tech issues that crop up. Most of the instructors are also very comfortable with using all available features of online learning. One teacher who stands out in my mind had video lectures, ipod lectures, webinars, etc in addition to the basic powerpoints. I don't think it was too challenging or time-consuming and I felt pretty-well prepared for practice, although I definitely have my weak areas (ortho). In addition, although you learn suturing briefly at clinical bound as well as some other procedures, if you don't do these in clinical, you don't feel very prepared to do them in practice. Since finding the clinical site is up to you and they don't require specific experiences (like suturing), your level of preparation for some procedural things or types of patients might really be different from others and also practice expectations where you go to work.
    PatMac10,RN likes this.
  10. 0
    I am very interested in attending a Nurse Practitioner program. I am currently researching several programs. Any suggestions?
  11. 0
    BSNRN, could you please tell me what state you are from? I'm from Texas and want to apply at Frontier but I don't know if they meet all of Texas accreditations in order for me to sit for my boards.


Top