Anyone get into an NP program with the minimum GPA?

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    So, my GPA is pretty low after being an idiot my first few years of college. I have the minimum and my grades have improved dramatically. I'm planning on raising my grade as much as possible before I apply. I have close to 2 years, so ample time. So, again did anyone have just the mins when they applied? Thanks
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  3. 27 Comments so far...

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    My undergrad GPA was not spectacular. It wasn't awful, but in retrospect, I could have done better. I think anxiety about my grades kept me from going back for my MSN earlier. After 5 years of working as an RN, I did pretty decent on the GRE and applied to the MSN program at my alma mater.

    I was accepted, but in order to enter the program, they required that I take (and pass) the pathophysiology course prior to becoming a full-time student, which delayed me a year (and I deferred entry for another year).

    It really didn't bother me that I had to do that...in fact, it was great! Everyone else was so stressed with assessment and pathophysiology, etc, and I had already gotten one of the biggest classes out of the way.
    sMoLsNurse likes this.
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    Just curious how everyone is classifying their gpa as "awful" or "pretty low?" Those terms are relative, and what's "awful" to one person may be "okay" to another. I graduated with a 3.2 with my BSN, and I also have another bachelor's degree in Biology with a final GPA of 3.2. I don't feel those are terrible, but they're not exactly competitive either. I'd like to think that having 2 BS degrees would help compensate for the less competitive GPAs, but I'm not counting on that either. So I, too, am curious how many people are accepted into NP programs with "less than perfect" GPAs?
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    I"m also wondering what would constitute a good gpa? I'm thinking of doing online registered nurse program.
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    My non-nursing BA from when I was 21 had a GPA of 2.6, but my ASN was 3.9 and so far my RN to BSN gpa is a 4.0. I'm absolutely terrified that no one will look past my previous gpa from 12 years ago now. Anyone else in a similar place?
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    Well, before I got my LPN I had a 1.7, which is awful. I got a 3.4 in my PN program, took a few courses and raised my gpa to a 2.5. I am currently going for my ASN and I have a 2.6. I'm trying to raise it as much as possible, but I'm pretty nervous.
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    Quote from sMoLsNurse
    Well, before I got my LPN I had a 1.7, which is awful. I got a 3.4 in my PN program, took a few courses and raised my gpa to a 2.5. I am currently going for my ASN and I have a 2.6. I'm trying to raise it as much as possible, but I'm pretty nervous.
    Those do sound like terrible numbers... But good luck to you regardless!
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    Loyola University New Orleans has a minimum GPA of 3.0 & that was what I had. I did great on the interview. I worked full time during undergrad and took care of 4 kids. They were impressed. GPA is important but not everything. I have a GPA of 3.6 in grad school now.
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    I got in with the Minimum GPA. Made mistakes when I was younger (we were all young and stupid once right lol) and ended up with slightly above a 3.0 when I applied (Like 3.01 haha). What was very clear to admissions though was that once I got my act together 45 credits into my first degree, my ADN, then the BSN, I did not make below a B (Mostly A's) in any class. Find a program that weighs the last 60 hours more heavily and take the word "C" out of your vocabulary.

    In all honesty if you really want this you need to be going for an A in every class henceforth. When you make a B it better be because you were fighting tooth and nail to make an A and had to settle. This will show admissions that you want this and how much of a priority school is to you now! I would say good luck, but instead I wish you the best efforts!
    TashaLPN2006RN2012 likes this.
  12. 0
    My overall is a 2.99 and I'm struggling with what to do.


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