Where to go from here?

  1. 0
    Hi guys!

    CRNA?

    Background:
    I'm new to the site and have been reading as many threads as possible! I am a senior at a large university studying biology. Currently I have a 3.65 and around a 3.6 science GPA. It will probably go down a little since I am taking 17 hours this semester and 21 next semester, but I think it will stay above a 3.5. I know, I know, take an extra semester, but I can't because of financial reasons. I made As in both ochem 1&2, biochem, and loved both! During the summer I did an undergrad research internship down at GHSU for 9 weeks. I've raised 2 service dogs and am very involved in the program. I've got a 1130 GRE. I've volunteered over 90+ hours in my local hospital and shadowed many different health professionals.

    Throughout my college career I've had a few majors from recreational studies, education, to biology. I thought of doing AA, but was talked out of that from a few different doctors. I then went to PT, but I love the OR, and soon left PT. I was pre-med for a while, but am very interested in having a life as well a job, not having my job BE my life. I found out about CRNA through some friends and have been really interested and am hoping that this job will be one that I love as well as something that will facilitate all of my other passions as well.

    My concerns are my stats, and not having a high GPA my senior year as well as loans. I will already have my bachelors in Biology and am planning on going to the CNL program at GHSU to get my RN, working in the ICU for 1-2 years, then going to the CRNA program at GHSU.

    Every CRNA I've talked to has seemed to love their jobs. Are there any CRNAs out there that can share their experiences? HOw was it paying off your loans? That is a huge concern for me. Was it worth it? I know that this process will be about just as long as Med school and residency (not exactly), but for me it's more the quality of life that is important. I want the possibility of working part-time if necessary for when I have kids, is this something that is offered for CRNAs? I've talked to nurses and CRNAs, and am going to shadow a family friend who is a CRNA this Friday and hope that it goes well!

    What do ya'll think? Any advice would be so welcome! Any CRNAs wish they would have gone to Med school? Happy with your job? Have enough time to do other things that you enjoy and for your family?

    Thanks so much in advance!!!!!!
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  3. 5 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    Not every MD works constantly. In fact there are many great specialities-derm, Inf.Dis, Plastics, renal, GI, ophtamology and especially radiology and ENT where you can have a great balance. If you are still young definetely go to med school and choose your specialty wisely, if you are nearing 30 its time to jump on CRNA train. As a CRNA you are independent(not always) but you make 1/2 of what the MD makes and still have to fight the MD/CRNA turf war. I got a little too old for med school so I decided to go the RN route but would encourage you to become an MD since your grades are good. There are may more specialities in MD, and what would you do if you discover you do not enjoy the stress of CRNA..my 2c.
  5. 0
    At this point it is going to take you just about as long to become an MDA or a CRNA, if you want to be a physician you should pursue that route and not worry about loans.

    You are going to come out of school in debt as an MDA or as an CRNA, but at 150K+/yr for a CRNA or 250K+/yr for an MDA I think most people can afford to pay off their student loans without any financial difficulties.

    MDAs and CRNAs do the same thing. We both provide anesthesia, and if you don't want to worry about politics or supervision you can always work in a CRNA only practice. MDAs do have the advantage on being able to branch out. You will find MDAs that specialize in pain management, critical care, regional, neuro, cardiac etc. You won't find that many CRNAs that are truly specialized.
    Last edit by wtbcrna on Nov 10, '11
  6. 1
    Quote from wtbcrna
    At this point it is going to take you just about as long to become an MDA or a CRNA, if you want to be a physician you should pursue that route and not worry about loans.

    You are going to come out of school in debt as an MDA or as CRNA, but at 150K+/yr for a CRNA or 250K+/yr for an MDA I think most people can afford to pay off their student loans without any financial difficulties.

    MDAs and CRNAs do the same thing. We both provide anesthesia, and if you don't want to worry about politics or supervision you can always work in a CRNA only practice. MDAs do have the advantage on being able to branch out. You will find MDAs that specialize in pain management, critical care, regional, neuro, cardiac etc. You won't find that many CRNAs that are truly specialized.
    Working while going to CRNA school is not an option. It is the quickest way for most SRNAs to fail out of school.
    Zaphod likes this.
  7. 0
    Hey Zaphod,

    I am 21 and will graduate college in May. My problem is that while I love science and the challenge of it, I am not passionate about one specialty over another. I have shadowed a lot of different health care professions and think that health care is something that I am interested in, but have not found one thing that I absolutely love that could get me through med school in order to do that profession. While my job will be very important to me, again, it is the quality of life that is most important to me. I've talked to doctors who have recommemded PA because of the lifestyle difference. Even though I know that there are professions of MD that are less hectic, I have yet to find one that I am so passionate about to get me through med school. In all honesty I am burning out after 4 years of hard science classes and would dread the terrifying 4 years of med school. WHile I know the nursing classes would be far from a walk in the park, I believe with my science background I would be ahead of the other students coming into the accelerated program. Still just confused on what to do and frustrated that so many other people seem to find their passion in college, while I am left wondering what I want to do as a career. Thanks for your reply!!!!
  8. 0
    Well, seems as you think that nursing is the easy way-but you might regret your decision. Burnout is very common in nursing as well. Put some extra effort and go to med school. You dont have to have any kind of passion for specialty now, these things take time. Soo, I will stick with my earlier recomendation.


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