So many questions about CRNA

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    I am currently a nursing student and I am considering the possibility of going back to school to become a CRNA when I graduate with my BSN. I have so many unanswered questions. I guess I will start off with. I have looked on websites such as Monster and Indeed and I know that there are RN jobs all over the place, but it seems to me that CRNA jobs are very scarce. What is the job outlook for CRNAs in the coming years? Are any of you who are CRNAs finding it difficult to find jobs now? Also, is it more difficult for new grad CRNAs to find jobs as opposed to someone who has a few years or more of experience?

    Another thing that worries me, is that I have been reading on other threads that while in CRNA school anywhere from 40-70 hours can be spent on school work and clinicals. Is this true? And is it even feasible to have a part-time job with this schedule?

    I am currently 20 years old and I have 2.5 years before I am finished with my BSN. I will be married in just over a year. If I decided to go back to school to become a CRNA, I would want to do it right away while I was young. My future husband and I would postpone having children until after I graduated. I am just afraid that if I become a CRNA that I will miss out on a lot of my babies milestones and life in general. What I always wanted to do was work for a few years as an RN then have kids and quit until they went into grade school then I would go back to work part time or full time. I just don't know if I become a CRNA what my time restrictions will be. I have heard that you are at the mercy of the Anesthesiologist and that if he stays later then you stay later. Is this true? One of the main reasons why I went to school to become a RN is the flexibility of scheduling. If I were to become a CRNA would I have the ability to have the same flexibility of scheduling?

    I don't know that much about CRNAs. If anyone could voice their opinion whether negative or positive that would be greatly appreciated. I would really like feedback so maybe I can see things that I never even considered. Any comment would be greatly appreciated. THANKS!!
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  4. 32 Comments so far...

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    I'm also in nursing school and will be done with my BSN in a little over two years. I have been thinking about doing a CRNA program also, but have a lot of the same questions. I don't know where you are located, but OHSU is the only school in my area that has a CRNA program and they want 3-5 years of floor nursing before you have begin their program. I guess that will give me time to decide, but I'm afraid after working for that long that I wont want to go back to school. I think it's great that you are willing to wait to start your family. I'm 5 years older than you, but I have three kids and my husband is also staring nursing school next term. This has been very tough on them and you will be gald you waited! Good luck with your journey! I hope someone posts some good info on here!
  6. 1
    Quote from golf_nurse2b
    I don't know that much about CRNAs.
    You might want to try shadowing a few CRNAs before deciding if this is even a career path you want to consider.
    lrobinson5 likes this.
  7. 0
    Most CRNA programs will want a minimum of 1-2 years of full-time ICU experience as RN before you even apply. Anesthetist programs are also transitioning to DNP programs by 2022 and some universities only offer a BSN - DNP/DNAP opton now that is 3-4 years of full-time study.

    I would encourage you to complete your BSN first and then aim for working in an ICU environment. Then shadow CRNAs to see if that pathway appeals to you.
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    I am also a senior, and planning on goin to CRNA school after my undergrad. I do have a great GPA and will be working in critical care after school (currently work as an ER and a CPCU tech, but the hospital I work for has a new graduate critical care internship and I am pretty sure I will be able to get in). As for the job outlook for CRNAs, it is great and will continue to better as hospitals becuase CRNAs provide almost the same service as anesthesiologist but cheaper so hospitals prefer them. My mothers bestfriend is a CRNA and she works for a private group but she gets lots of job offers from travel companies.

    Usually CRNA jobs are not listed at those sites you look at so try GasWorks.com or crnajobs.com. With regards to the number of study hours, it is very true and you cannot work as a SRNA student and it is very hard as I have been told.

    Bottom line is if you are willing to work hard and you really want this, it is doable.

    goodluck
  9. 0
    Quote from jemmens
    As for the job outlook for CRNAs, it is great and will continue to better as hospitals becuase CRNAs provide almost the same service as anesthesiologist but cheaper so hospitals prefer them.
    Hmm...What service(s) do anesthesiologists provide that CRNAs can't/don't?
  10. 0
    Quote from wtbcrna
    Hmm...What service(s) do anesthesiologists provide that CRNAs can't/don't?
    LOL! I would like to know this as well.
  11. 0
    Quote from wtbcrna
    Hmm...What service(s) do anesthesiologists provide that CRNAs can't/don't?
    Physician consults.
  12. 0
    I am not a CRNA so I cant tell, but I do know it varies from state to state. The responsibilities of anesthesiologists differ from that of a CRNA in that they are trained in every aspect of anesthesiology. As a physician, they are licensed to diagnose patients and advise courses of actions. Generally, they are held to a higher standard of medical care than that of a CRNA. They can supervise operations as opposed to just administer anesthesia. They are licensed to practice without the order of any other physician, a procedure most CRNAs are required to do.

    Read more: Anesthetist Vs. Anesthesiologist | eHow.com Anesthetist Vs. Anesthesiologist | eHow.com
  13. 2
    Quote from jemmens
    I am not a CRNA so I cant tell, but I do know it varies from state to state. The responsibilities of anesthesiologists differ from that of a CRNA in that they are trained in every aspect of anesthesiology. As a physician, they are licensed to diagnose patients and advise courses of actions. Generally, they are held to a higher standard of medical care than that of a CRNA. They can supervise operations as opposed to just administer anesthesia. They are licensed to practice without the order of any other physician, a procedure most CRNAs are required to do.

    Read more: Anesthetist Vs. Anesthesiologist | eHow.com Anesthetist Vs. Anesthesiologist | eHow.com
    you need a better reference than eHow to differentiate, consider the AANA or ASA sites. both types of anesthesia providers are educated and trained to provide all aspects of anesthesia care; however MDAs can specialize in chronic pain management, but this is slowly changing.

    CRNAs and MDAs are held to the same standard of care when delivering anesthesia.

    you are correct in that MDAs can medically supervise/direct if the practice arrangement allows for this model of delivery, but CRNAs do not need an MDA or any other physician's license in order to practice.
    wtbcrna and jemmens like this.


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