RN to CRNA - which road?

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    Hello, all! I am new to this forum, new to nursing in general, and still trying to figure out where to post, so bear with me if you see duplicates. This site has been a tremendous tool in garnering different perspectives about the roles of nursing, as I am just a student at this point. I would eventually love to work in anesthesia, despite the many who love to tell me my mind will change during the course of my education and experiences, and I am quite aware that this is a possibility. In the event that I stay on course, however, I am interested to know some of your experiences regarding the path you chose for your education. I am currently enrolled in an ASN program. The direction I move in gets fuzzy at my graduation point: Do I bridge RN to BSN? RN to MSN? Is there a bridge program for RN to MSN specialties? I am in my early 30's now. I've been reading a lot about experience being key to the process, which should be a no-brainer. However, is there room for exceptions to the rule? Obviously, I can't get into certain programs unless I have the experience requirements. My curiosity is more about credibility with peers, colleagues, etc. I'd like to hear about those of you who've made it through online programs, as well as traditional programs (read: online RN to BSN programs, as I know that's not an option for MSN specialties). Regards, tml
  2. 67 Comments so far...

  3. 1
    Quote from tmlegros
    Hello, all! I am new to this forum, new to nursing in general, and still trying to figure out where to post, so bear with me if you see duplicates. This site has been a tremendous tool in garnering different perspectives about the roles of nursing, as I am just a student at this point. I would eventually love to work in anesthesia, despite the many who love to tell me my mind will change during the course of my education and experiences, and I am quite aware that this is a possibility. In the event that I stay on course, however, I am interested to know some of your experiences regarding the path you chose for your education. I am currently enrolled in an ASN program. The direction I move in gets fuzzy at my graduation point: Do I bridge RN to BSN? RN to MSN? Is there a bridge program for RN to MSN specialties? I am in my early 30's now. I've been reading a lot about experience being key to the process, which should be a no-brainer. However, is there room for exceptions to the rule? Obviously, I can't get into certain programs unless I have the experience requirements. My curiosity is more about credibility with peers, colleagues, etc. I'd like to hear about those of you who've made it through online programs, as well as traditional programs (read: online RN to BSN programs, as I know that's not an option for MSN specialties). Regards, tml
    My advice would be to finish your ASN and then apply to work as an RN in the ICU. You can get your work experience while finishing your BSN online. I took the traditional path (normal 4 year BSN), but I have worked w/ many nurses that had their 2 year degree and finished their BSN online while working in the ICU. You can also have enough critical care hours to sit for your CCRN exam. This exam will most likely be a requirement for most CRNA programs. And I think you have to be an ICU nurse for atleast one year until you can sit for the CCRN exam. In my opinion, doing an RN to MSN path would not be worth the time and effort if pursuing anesthesia. I took quite a bit of Master's level courses before starting CRNA school and only 3 classes transferred. Don't get me wrong, I think education is important, so why not work on the RN to MSN, but it will take you longer to get to your goal of anesthesia. Also, shadowing a CRNA is very important to do before making your final decision. Good luck!
    TheBlackDogWaits likes this.
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    If you already have a bachelors degree in a health or science field some programs will accept u with that degree plus ur RN license (ADN) and a min 1-2 years in ICU provided you have a good GPA n etc. That's the right I'm taking. I also say take a few grad level courses to show u can handle grad level coursework like advanced pharm,patho, organic chem, things along those lines
    TheBlackDogWaits likes this.
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    I was going to finish up my first semester, then apply for a tech job so that i would have my foot in the door by the time the program is over, in order to get an RN position in any cc unit.Are you telling me, though, that I don't have to have a master's degree to apply to a CRNA program? I thought that was a requirement... so glad we are having this conversation!
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    I have my Allied Health degree already, but that is just an AAH.
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    Certain CRNA programs require either a BSN or a BS in a health related field and ur RN licenses (ADN). One in particular is Rush university. It's just simple research to look up
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    When u graduate from a CRNA program your awarded either a MSN or DNP so there's no need to get a masters beforehand unless u just want one to have one
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    Thanks, mayahp22....I was looking into it at a local university in Louisiana, and I guess the way the programs are listed, I just assumed the order was dictated by -- I dunno, I am not sure why I even assumed. I appreciate you taking the time.
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    No problem its all about research but once again some programs require a BSN n some do not just like finding a job in the hospital. It's at the discretion of the school.
  11. 0
    Is your AAH degree a bachelors degree?


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