RN to CRNA - which road? - page 3

by TheBlackDogWaits

13,632 Views | 66 Comments

Hello, all! I am new to this forum, new to nursing in general, and still trying to figure out where to post, so bear with me if you see duplicates. This site has been a tremendous tool in garnering different perspectives about... Read More


  1. 0
  2. 0
    Awesome!

    Thank you
  3. 0
    Quote from suppaduppaCNA
    I started volunteering in an ICU a few months ago and I am looking forward to get a job as a Care Partner/Nurse Tech in an ICU while in Nursing School so that I can increase my chances to land a job in a Critical Care Dept upon graduation. I really like the working environment, nurse to pt ratio etc...I definitely see myself working in an ICU rather than Med-Surg. I wouldn't mind working there for up to 5 years.Beside the ICU experience which is a requirement for CRNA School, I want to know every little thing that makes a candidate outstanding (such as shadowing exp.). Does the school where you get your BSN from matters?I would like to work extensively on and publish one of my research paper because I read somewhere that CRNA schools love that. Should I bother? what do you think?@ dah doh: Thanks. What kind of committees are you referring to? Do you mean any Leadership Role or Nursing associations like committees@PMFB-RN: Thanks for sharing that precious info.@StudentEtc: Darn! I already told some of the ICU Nurses about my future project... I never heard of AAH before. May I ask you what state you're in? How was your first semester in NS?
    AAH aka Associate of Allied Health, which I'm sure is generic enough to be legit across the board, but maybe I'm wrong. I'm in New Orleans, La. I'm currently in my first semester of nursing school. Try not to laugh too hard... it's been a theme here for students; sad, but true. May I ask what you did as a volunteer in the ICU? I've read about that here before, and unfortunately was laughed at about that as well when I recycled it for advice. This f'ing site can be brutal and unforgiving to a fault sometimes. Anyway, yes, I would love to know how you spent your time volunteering in an ICU. Thank you kindly!
  4. 1
    Actually, It's a kind of internship program for pre-med students at a University Hospital. The goal is to help out the staff which in return answer your questions and let you watch the procedures. You get to interact with the doctors, RNs and of course the Care partners. Many Residents/MD have been through this program before the University's Med school, therefore they are really aproachable as you remind them who they used to be once...lol.
    What I do? - Lots of clerk work on a down time answering call lights, phone calls and assisting visitors, Pass out lab work, fill out the carts and do errands for the Nurses...(yes! I can go back and forth to decontamination, central supply and Nutrition close to 10x on a shift lol)..So far, I have seen procedures such as ArcticSun, Laryngoscopy, a Gastro MD Fixing GI bleeding live, Lumbar puncture...
    (Please excuse my spelling errors ). Off course I am not allowed to be directly involve during the procedures but hey, for a newbee like me It's amazing to see a bunch of doctors running whenever there is a code blue..lol. I can't wait to come back when I leave and I wich I could stay longuer. The doctors are amazing and the Nurses are incredible.

    Suppa
    TheBlackDogWaits likes this.
  5. 0
    Quote from suppaduppaCNA
    I
    Beside the ICU experience which is a requirement for CRNA School, I want to know every little thing that makes a candidate outstanding (such as shadowing exp.). Does the school where you get your BSN from matters?
    I would like to work extensively on and publish one of my research paper because I read somewhere that CRNA schools love that. Should I bother? what do you think?
    @ dah doh: Thanks. What kind of committees are you referring to? Do you mean any Leadership Role or Nursing associations like committees
    Read here and other sites about info they like to see. Getting published is great, know many that have gotten into school and no one has done this. Take grad level sciences after your bachelors they will like that better.

    Committees like unit based or hosp based. Clinical practice shared leadership etc. When u get a job you will see. I did system wide code blue.

    I would say where you do rn to bsn doesn't matter , although I personally would only go if they also had a brick and morter bsn program as well. I did online and was accepted.

    Good luck
  6. 0
    Thanks for your input missnurse. May I ask you why do you prefer the brick and mortar system?
  7. 2
    Quote from suppaduppaCNA
    Thanks for your input missnurse. May I ask you why do you prefer the brick and mortar system?
    My experience is that getting into CRNA school isn't hard. I have never known anyone who didn't get in. I know a few who had to apply two years in a row to get accepted.
    I got my BSN from an online school (WGU). I had classmates who got theirs from U of P and other online schools.
    Get good grades, get a job in a high level ICU, SICU and / or CVICU is best but others are OK too. Do a good job (so you can get great reference letters), learn a lot, get your CCRN, get a bachelors degree and apply. If you don't get accepted take 6-9 credits of graduate classes as a non degree seeking student (I did this, side benifit of reducing my work load during the didactic year) and re-apply. I have never even heard of anyone who did those things who didn't get accepted. Well when I was in school we did hear of qualified nurses who didn't make it in cause they blew the interview. The usual reason was they came in acting like Gods' gift to nursing and anesthesia. (huge ego).
    I was accepted to 3 of the 4 school I applied to the first time I applied. My grades were good, but not perfect. If I remeber right I had a 3.66 combined nursing school and BSN program and the BSN portion was strait 3.0 (highest GPA possible with WGU).
    When I did have was 5 years of very high qualiety experience.
    besaangel and TheBlackDogWaits like this.
  8. 0
    Quote from suppaduppaCNA
    Thanks for your input missnurse. May I ask you why do you prefer the brick and mortar system?
    No I went to an online program for rn-bsn. But it was housed in a college that had a brick and mortar BSN program. Therefore there was infrastructure there, from instructors to everything else. Also I choose a school that had been doing distance learning for a long time, as that state has a spread out population. It was just my choice.
  9. 0
    Quote from IndiCRNA
    My experience is that getting into CRNA school isn't hard. I have never known anyone who didn't get in. I know a few who had to apply two years in a row to get accepted. I got my BSN from an online school (WGU). I had classmates who got theirs from U of P and other online schools. Get good grades, get a job in a high level ICU, SICU and / or CVICU is best but others are OK too. Do a good job (so you can get great reference letters), learn a lot, get your CCRN, get a bachelors degree and apply. If you don't get accepted take 6-9 credits of graduate classes as a non degree seeking student (I did this, side benifit of reducing my work load during the didactic year) and re-apply. I have never even heard of anyone who did those things who didn't get accepted. Well when I was in school we did hear of qualified nurses who didn't make it in cause they blew the interview. The usual reason was they came in acting like Gods' gift to nursing and anesthesia. (huge ego). I was accepted to 3 of the 4 school I applied to the first time I applied. My grades were good, but not perfect. If I remeber right I had a 3.66 combined nursing school and BSN program and the BSN portion was strait 3.0 (highest GPA possible with WGU). When I did have was 5 years of very high qualiety experience.
    I love to see responses like this, too. So many times, I hear about how or why so-and-so is incredibly difficult, when all along the only requirement is applying yourself and doing the leg work, which in and of itself is not difficult at all; I'm sure if you have time constraints and multiple commitments you will be spread thin, but those are usually the people making all the woeful generalizations. Granted, I'm certain that if I had 5 kids, my perspective would change. However, it's just as nice to hear about the success of someone who manages time well and moves through the process appropriately, instead of the constant stream from those who just don't have any more time to manage. Thank you for your feedback here. My respects to all of you that have done well balancing family life and school; I don't know that I could be so diligent.
    Last edit by TheBlackDogWaits on Jan 23, '13
  10. 1
    I think what you end up hearing is comments to the posters who do not want to do any of the leg work to get into school. they want to know which schools do not require GRE , and the easiest schools to get into - with both low GPA and minimal experience . they also do not have any intentions of taking more sciences, grad level or not. it is those posters who wear on everyone's nerves and lead people to give short clipped Answers. because these are not to people that we want in anesthesia. we want the ones that will do anything and that will constantly strive for their profession and continually seek out educational advancement .

    it's not that it's hardto get in, it's that it takes a lot of work sometimes.

    If it were impossible no one would get in to quality programs.

    Good luck
    suppaduppaCNA likes this.


Top