Requirements to becoming a CRNA

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    1. AA in Nursing to become a CRNA?
    2. GPA standards?
    3. Any way around volunteer hours at the hospital?
    4. CRNA or Anesthesiologist?
    5. Qualifications to becoming a CRNA?

    I'm sorry if I am asking questions that have been previously covered. I'm new here and I just have a few questions about anesthesiology. My mother and oldest brother are both nurses and I've always known growing up that I would want to follow in the same field. I'm almost 22, currently at a community college in Florida, and almost finished with my prerequisites for an AA in Nursing. My GPA (3.66) could be better, but it's not bad. I feel that my prerequisites are taking so long, because I am also in the honors program at my college and they require an honors course every semester (whether it helps toward your degree or not).

    I'm sorry for the novel, but I wanted to give just a little bit of background. My first question is basically this: Is going for an AA in Nursing the right degree to start with for a career as a CRNA? I was hoping to transfer to a University (UCF or possibly UF, if financial aid allows it). My community college has a nursing program, but all I hear is how hard it is to get in to. I worry that my 3.66 GPA will not be enough to put me in the first priorities. Could anyone provide me with a realistic GPA standard for the nursing programs? And do degrees from Universities look better on transcripts than from 4-year community colleges, or is it about the same?

    Another issue that I am concerned with is that I do not have any volunteering hours at the hospital. Several others that I know who are trying to get into the nursing program are having trouble getting volunteer hours, because they currently have so many volunteers at my local hospitals. I know that this is a huge requirement, but is there possibly a way around it? I do volunteer in general, but I have not had the opportunity to help out at the hospital yet. I also hear that if you do get to volunteer at the hospital, it has to be around a schedule that they give you (which, currently, would most likely conflict with my school hours and I do not have a flexible babysitter for my daughter).

    Other than those main questions, I would like to know if anyone in the field of anesthesiology would be kind enough to lend me a few suggestions and/or thoughts about their career. What is the most rewarding part of your job? Do you prefer CRNA or Anesthesiologist? What do you think would make a person most qualified for this career choice? Any comments pertaining to anesthesiology would be much appreciated!
    Last edit by MissMaster on Apr 16, '13 : Reason: Added content
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  4. 9 Comments so far...

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    Welcome to AN! The largest online nursing community!

    Most CRNA programs are VERY INTENSE PROGRAMS, VERY COMPETITIVE, require a BSN AND critical care experience.

    Thread moved for best response
  6. 0
    Quote from Esme12
    Welcome to AN! The largest online nursing community!

    Most CRNA programs are VERY INTENSE PROGRAMS, VERY COMPETITIVE, require a BSN AND critical care experience.

    Thread moved for best response
    Just to clarify I think the OP meant is an ADN a sufficient degree to START with and then transfer to a RN to BSN program. I too am interested to hear people's comments as I just recently graduated from an ADN program and will start RN to BSN in August. My guess is it doesn't matter as long as you end up with a BSN (with, of course all the other requirements)...
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    Many CRNAs started with an ADN, myself included. While nurse anesthesia programs may accept the ADN applicant-obviously with bachelors degree-the hold up can be the critical care experience. The ADN is becoming a barrier.

    It can be more difficult to obtaining an ICU position, or even an RN position in a hospital with an ADN. Some hospitals won't consider an ADN grad, and some unit managers show clear preference to BSN over ADN grads. This is a change from even 5 years ago. A BSN completion program following the ADN may not be very helpful in the unit managers opinion. When I've asked about this in my area, the unit mangers state the BSN grads have more clinical. Since BSN completions typically don't have any clinical experience it is not always helpful. I would check out your local area, but also understand that while ADN grads may be hired in 2013, they may not in 2015 in your area.
    wtbcrna likes this.
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    Thank you for the responses. I spoke with one of the guidance counselors in the nursing department of my college today (and finally got some answers from someone working there). I think I have a better understanding of what I need to do. Thanks again for your time =]
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    I'm curious to know what your guidance counselor said, just because they don't always know the facts or can be misleading.
  10. 0
    OP, most people apply to all of the schools in communting distance for initial RN degree - ADN or BSN. Competition is very fierce! There are not a ton of jobs at this point in many parts of the country. It also depends on your part of the country as to whether you can get a new grad position in the hosp without BSN. Where I am in the NW we hire people no problem with ADN but there is the new stipulation that people must have BSN within 5 years. I did that route with no problem, online rn-bsn was fairly painless. Sadly in many places your pay doesn't change.

    First thing you need to do is find a way to shadow nurses, floor nurses, ICU, CRNA's, NPs, or other providers such as anesthesiologists and PA's to see what they do and if those are routes you would prefer.

    For volunteering, do not forget things like EMS (volunteering for first responder duty for example) and also with the red cross. You can become a teacher for them, take disaster classes, etc, which will all look awesome. Also the smaller places like urgent cares might take a volunteer.

    good luck. It is a long long road no matter what you do.
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    Just a random question but do CRNA schools care if you take the science prereqs such as organic chem and such at a community college or a university? I'm going to be graduating from my BSN school (non-RN) and realized that I'd like to consider being a CRNA. Is it too late to take the science prereqs at a community college? I live about 1.5-2 hours away from my BSN school and I commute over an hour weekly whereas my community college is nearby me.
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    You're bound to get a few different responses to this question. My advice would be to talk to the program directors of the schools you are applying to. I had a lot of options to choose from as I also needed to take science pre-reqs. I'm nearly finished with my two science pre-reqs I ultimately decided to take online at a community college, and I received my first interview invitation last week (earlier than I had expected). Good luck to you!
    Scooby-Dooby-Doo likes this.
  13. 1
    Quote from Just4Kixs
    Just a random question but do CRNA schools care if you take the science prereqs such as organic chem and such at a community college or a university? I'm going to be graduating from my BSN school (non-RN) and realized that I'd like to consider being a CRNA. Is it too late to take the science prereqs at a community college? I live about 1.5-2 hours away from my BSN school and I commute over an hour weekly whereas my community college is nearby me.
    I took all of my sciences at the community college and was accepted
    Scooby-Dooby-Doo likes this.


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