MS versus DNP

  1. 0
    So, just to give a background on what I know (or what I think I know); here it goes...

    Some CRNA programs I have been looking at are programs where the CRNA student gets a Master's degree when they graduate. Other CRNA programs have it listed where the CRNA student gets a DNP when they graduate. Lastly, I have seen a few CRNA programs that offer MS/DNP degrees for CRNA's.

    My question is, does it matter, right now, what degree you get? I have researched some about this but, opinions scatter this topic on forums to the point where I don't feel like reading through internet fights so I don't get much information. I have read somewhere that until 2025, CRNA's are still able to enter and complete MS programs. Also, that if you are a CRNA with a MS, you are grandfathered in to the DNP category, basically just the same as ever other CRNA, except you have another degree but you can still practice the same amount of care. Correct? Yay or Nah?

    If this is correct, by grandfathering into the DNP category, would a CRNA with a MS have to go back to school to earn the title of DNP. In other words, would it be like the RN to BSN shift in nurses where places that have had RN's working for years, encourage them to go back to school to earn their BSN?

    I just feel like the terms "grandfathered in" is confusing me. Does this mean that by a certain amount of time, this profession will just have a higher title for people who earned the title and for people who were fortunate enough to get a MS before that time and are automatically at the same level.

    If this is confusing you in any way, I am right there with ya'. If someone with an understanding of this whole concept could explain it in layman terms to me, it would be much appreciated. I am far off from applying, but I would like to know in order to narrow down a list of schools with programs that would benefit me in the long run.

    I wouldn't want to get an MS just because I thought I wouldn't have to do anything to get a DNP. That sounds silly, but 2 years is better than 3 for the same scope.

    Thank you for reading and responding!
    Last edit by DEADBEAR on Dec 30, '12
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  3. 33 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    One more thing, I mentioned earlier in my original post about schools have MS/DNP programs. What are they specifically. To me, they look like the ordinary new DNP programs for CRNA's.
  5. 0
    They are trying to do the same thing with APN's by making NP's get a DNP by 2015.

    All this means is that there is a push for a higher degree by a certain time. So, if you become a CRNA before 2025 then you will be fine to practice with just a master's degree, however, all CRNA's graduating AFTER 2025 will be required to have a DNP.
  6. 0
    Just a small caveat on the "grandfathering in" issue -- yes, all the proposals to require a DNP for entry to advanced practice in the future include reassurance that current MSN-prepared individuals will be "grandfathered in" (because that's the only way the pro-mandatory-DNP crowd would ever be able to get anyone to even consider discussing it with them) and most discussions of this (here and elsewhere) include some comments about how that means the MSN-prepared clinicians will still be able to practice fully, just the way they do now. However, no one really knows how that will work. What we do know is what happened when NP programs made the switch, many years ago, from certificate programs to MSN programs. Graduates of certificate programs were "grandfathered in," just as everyone is talking about for MSN-prepared advanced practice nurses now. Once that happened officially, though, graduates of certificate programs were able to continue practicing as they had been in their current state; but they found, when they wanted to get licensed in another state, that, since the minimum requirement for licensure was now an MSN, they weren't eligible for (advanced practice) licensure in any other states and were "stuck" in their current state if they wanted to practice as NPs rather than generalist RNs.

    Things could be different this time around, but the reality is that no one knows what would happen if (big "if") the states ever decide to start requiring a DNP for advanced practice.
  7. 0
    Quote from SUNFL0WER
    One more thing, I mentioned earlier in my original post about schools have MS/DNP programs. What are they specifically. To me, they look like the ordinary new DNP programs for CRNA's.
    Hi,

    some of these programs you have an option right now to do the MS or the DNP. So they list is as ms/dnp. vcu is like this, after the first year of school you can choose to do dnp (well you have to apply so they can eval your grades, etc). Then at that point you have an extra class each semester, and at the end you do an extra 3 months of coursework to be awarded the dnp.
  8. 0
    Quote from elkpark
    Once that happened officially, though, graduates of certificate programs were able to continue practicing as they had been in their current state; but they found, when they wanted to get licensed in another state, that, since the minimum requirement for licensure was now an MSN, they weren't eligible for (advanced practice) licensure in any other states and were "stuck" in their current state if they wanted to practice as NPs rather than generalist RNs.

    Things could be different this time around, but the reality is that no one knows what would happen if (big "if") the states ever decide to start requiring a DNP for advanced practice.
    ooooohhhhhh, that would be awful! I am not set on the DNP as most coursework looks right now. I know some crna's have gone on to do phd instead of dnp for the same reasons. I wouldn't want to be restricted to never move.

    Hopefully more things will be ironed out sooner rather than later...
  9. 0
    Quote from MBrickle
    They are trying to do the same thing with APN's by making NP's get a DNP by 2015.
    Not quite true. There is no requirment at all for anyone to get a DNP by 2015 or any other date. The DNP for NPs is only a recomendation by the AACN, not a requirment. CRNAs will be required to get a doctorate (not DNP in most cases) by 2025. I question if it will really happen but as of now that is the stated requirment by the AANA.
  10. 2
    CRNAs have successfully went from certificate to Bachelors to Masters and now the COA/AANA are going to require new graduates graduating in the year 2025 or later to have a Doctorate (DNP/DNAP). There are still CRNAs with certificates practicing just as they have for years with the same scope of practice as Masters prepared CRNAs. One of the biggest pushes for CRNAs to get a Doctorate is that SRNAs are already doing much more than is required for a normal Masters so why not get the degree to match the credit hours. My nurse anesthesia program we graduated with 82 semester credit hours which approximately twice what a generic MSN or most other Master programs would have required.
    The nurse anesthesia council of accreditation (COA) has proposed that all nurse anesthesia programs move to a minimum of 36 month programs.
    Instead of focusing on the type of degree program offered I would first and foremost recommend consider the program that offers the best clinical experiences and that prepares graduates for independent practice.
    ikrainRN and loveanesthesia like this.
  11. 0
    inidcrna-any ideas what what types of doctorate crna's are getting instead of the dnap?
  12. 0
    http://www.aana.com/newsandjournal/D...409_p92-96.pdf An article all about CRNAs, nursing doctorates, and decision making process.


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