Low GPA, what can I do?

  1. 0
    After researching CRNA school requirements this week I am feeling somewhat discouraged.
    My cum GPA is 2.88 for BSN. I graduated 3 years ago. Only chance I see is I still have to take all chemistry, physics required courses. I'm planning on getting A's and doing well on the GRE. Getting the CCRN certification. I truly believe I can be a CRNA because I know what I want now and I know I can make a big difference with it. What graduate level courses should I plan to take? Anything else I can do? It is going to take some time to do all of this but I know it will be well worth it!
    Thanks for your help!
    J
  2. Get the Hottest Nursing Topics Straight to Your Inbox!

  3. 9 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    I'm looking at a few schools right now. Some schools truly only care what your grades were in important classes like A&P, chemistry, etc. They don't care if you got a C in art history. Seems most places want a B as well, not B-, B. One school even told me I wouldn't get a second look if I didn't retake a course to bring it up to a B from a B-.

    I got 1200 on my GRE (old format) which should give me some leeway in having B's instead of A's but it won't help schools overlook the fact I didn't have B's in the courses where they wanted 'em.

    Retaking courses is probably the only thing that will help you. Get some extra certifications and what not to help your application pop out, but without the basics like grades and experience you really don't stand a chance in such a competitive field. If you've got the drive, retake the courses. It ain't that bad. Better to tough out a few classes instead of regretting put the work in for the rest of your life.
    Getting To Great likes this.
  5. 1
    It is very important to have a competitive GPA (around 3.5) since about 90% of the applicants will. This will put you behind the 8 ball imediatly. Retake any science courses you did poorly on and also take some graduate level courses and make sure you get an A not a B. Some shools will calculate GPA differently, some will only look at you nursing and sciences and some will look at everything.
    ManchesterUnitedFan likes this.
  6. 0
    I found this website to be helpful. It lists schools that accept applications <3.0 GPA cum. http://www.all-crna-schools.com/crna-programs.html. I know some schools won't even look at my application if it's not over 3.0 like Loma Linda University. They even said I would have to retake the same science course at the same university in order for it to count. Is that common with CRNA programs? Last time I checked my school doesn't replace the highest grade in a class.
  7. 0
    i say take the CCRN and then take the CMC sub speciality if you can. This will show that your knowledgeable and dedicated in your field, you are able to self study and pass, and that you are motivated.

    As for classes, you must definitely show that you are able to excel in patho and pharmacology. if you still doubt your current level of skill in this area then i say retake the undergrad level courses. If you confident that your only issue was that you were a slacker and not that you just couldn't comprehend the material then i say go straight for the graduate level course. YOu'll kill two birds with one stone by showing that not only are you capable of the understanding the basic material, but you are able to excel at the graduate level.

    Also, like you said, take it slow. If you are on a really acute floor really take advantage of every learning opportunity. Make sure that you're not just doing the basic assess, chart, dole over meds, calling codes and then standing aside. Be more active in your patients care, question orders for learning purposes, research interesting topics to you, anticipate treatments.

    good luck!
  8. 1
    Look into taking graduate level courses such as advanced patho and pharmacology, and getting A's in them. Some programs will consider you with a low GPA if you do well in the graduate level courses. The reasoning being that you can handle the difficulty and excel when taking the higher level courses. However every program is different and how they select candidates is unique to each program.
    ManchesterUnitedFan likes this.
  9. 0
    This kind of goes along with this thread's topic, so I guess I'll post my question here and hope to get an answer...

    I actually have a question about the Chemistry requirements for the CRNA program. The programs I'm looking at require Gen Chem I, Gen Chem II, and Orgo. I got an A in GC I, I'm currently taking GC II, and it looks like I'll probably be getting somewhere between a C and a B in it (and I won't be taking Organic until this next Spring semester). If I were to take a graduate level Pathophysiology class, along with a grad level Stats course and do well in them, do you think that would help to "hide" a bad grade in GC II? I mean, I know that I've actually not even finished the course yet, but my school gives us the American Chemical Society's cumulative final over GC I and GC II for our final, and that beast is 70 questions of pure hell that have to be completed in under 2 hrs. So, I highly doubt that I'll be getting the high grade on it that I'd need to pull off that B. lol. But anyway, what say ye who have applied and been accepted to a CRNA program? Would grad level classes that have been completed well help to make up for a C in Gen Chem II?
  10. 0
    Quote from wannabanrnin2012
    This kind of goes along with this thread's topic, so I guess I'll post my question here and hope to get an answer...

    I actually have a question about the Chemistry requirements for the CRNA program. The programs I'm looking at require Gen Chem I, Gen Chem II, and Orgo. I got an A in GC I, I'm currently taking GC II, and it looks like I'll probably be getting somewhere between a C and a B in it (and I won't be taking Organic until this next Spring semester). If I were to take a graduate level Pathophysiology class, along with a grad level Stats course and do well in them, do you think that would help to "hide" a bad grade in GC II? I mean, I know that I've actually not even finished the course yet, but my school gives us the American Chemical Society's cumulative final over GC I and GC II for our final, and that beast is 70 questions of pure hell that have to be completed in under 2 hrs. So, I highly doubt that I'll be getting the high grade on it that I'd need to pull off that B. lol. But anyway, what say ye who have applied and been accepted to a CRNA program? Would grad level classes that have been completed well help to make up for a C in Gen Chem II?
    Well, I actually did end up getting the B (I scored the exact number of points on the final that I needed to earn the grade lol). But since I have to still take Orgo, and god knows how that class is gonna go, my question still stands: Will taking grad level stats and Pathophysiology courses help to hide/overshadow a less than spectacular grade?
  11. 0
    Quote from wannabanrnin2012
    Well, I actually did end up getting the B (I scored the exact number of points on the final that I needed to earn the grade lol). But since I have to still take Orgo, and god knows how that class is gonna go, my question still stands: Will taking grad level stats and Pathophysiology courses help to hide/overshadow a less than spectacular grade?

    Yes... good luck
  12. 0
    Loma Linda told me the same thing. I retook Physio and Pharmacology because I had B's. I'm taking a combined Gen,Org and Biochem class right now because they want Biochemistry. I am also taking physics. I'm still waiting to hear if I even got an interview, I know they already did their priority interviews. So i'm doubtful. Will apply out of state for classes starting in Spring 2013


Top